c++ – Would compiler optimization remove try/catch block if catch does nothing?

I am working with code that has a lot of try catch blocks in but most cases the catch blocks do nothing. As in the code below fib function is throwing invalid_argument exception. The function call in main is in the try block but the catch block does not do anything, except catching the exception.

I am wondering if the compiler might trim away this kind of exception handling during code optimization, or not?

#include <iostream>
#include <exception>


// Declaration for Wmissing-declarations flag
int fib(int);

int fib(int n)
{
    if (n < 0)
        {
            throw std::invalid_argument("Invalid argument");
        }
    if (n == 0 || n == 1)
        return n;
    
    return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv())
{
    int _number;
    std::cin >> _number;
    try
    {
        std::cout << fib(_number) << std::endl;
    }
    catch(const std::invalid_argument & e)
    {
        
    }
    return 0;
}

Compiling above code with most (all I know) flags turned on, as below, does not show any warning.

g++ -o except exceptions.cxx -pedantic -Wall -Wextra -Wcast-align -Wcast-qual -Wctor-dtor-privacy -Wdisabled-optimization -Wformat=2 -Winit-self -Wlogical-op -Wmissing-declarations -Wmissing-include-dirs -Wnoexcept -Wold-style-cast -Woverloaded-virtual -Wredundant-decls -Wshadow -Wsign-conversion -Wsign-promo -Wstrict-null-sentinel -Wstrict-overflow=5 -Wswitch-default -Wundef -Werror -Wno-unused