camera settings – Canon 70D wifi cannot be enabled

One thing to keep in mind, the 70D has been produced in two different versions. A version with and one without WiFi. Ensure you are certain that one of the two cameras you have is not the WiFi-less type of the 70D. This can be seen on the label on the bottom of your camera, it should state if it is a 70D (W) or a 70D (N) where the ‘N’ version is the WiFi-less variant.

Otherwise it might be as Aganju suggested in his answer, that an already enabled setting prevents you from enabling WiFi at this moment.

camera settings – Why doesn’t wifi on canon 70D connect to my Android device?

If you want to use your Canon 70D with a wifi connection, enable your camera’s wifi. When you get to the choice of camera access point and infrastructure mode, choose infrastructure mode. The 70D’s network list will then pop up with all of the wifi hotspots near you. Click on your wifi connection and then type in the password. Once that is done, you should be set for your camera.

Now go to your phone, make sure that you are connected to the same wifi, of course, and then launch the EOS remote app, and click on the bottom button that says camera connection and it should detect your camera. Click that and have fun!

sdcard – Canon 70D max supported SD card size

I just took a very quick look at the manaul online, and right there on page 3, it says:

Compatible Cards

The camera can use the following cards regardless of capacity:

  • SD memory cards
  • SDHC memory cards*
  • SDXC memory cards*

*UHS-I cards supported.

I would advise having a read through the Wikipedia article on SD cards. Card capacities are not the main factor in determining compatibility. SD cards have gone through a number of generations – SD (SDSC), SDHC, SDXC, SDUC – and newer generations are not necessarily backwards-compatible. There are also different bus interfaces – Default Speed, High Speed, UHS-I, UHS-II, UHS-III, SD Express.

There is additionally this relevant FAQ on the Canon website:
What Memory Cards can be used with the camera? (EOS 70D)

If the card you are considering fulfils the compatibility criteria that Canon mentions, then I see no reason why you should continue to assume incompatibility.

What is the meaning of the small blinking camera symbol in my Canon 70D viewfinder?

This is the electronic level indicator. It indicates that you’re not holding the camera parallel to the ground but instead have tilted it. The specific configuration indicates that you’ve got a tilt of greater than 2°.

From page 66 of the manual:

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Note that this is configurable — you can turn it off if you don’t like it. It’s also available on the rear LCD during Live View shooting (where it’s maybe a little more obvious as a level).

Also note the manual’s warning of a 1° margin of error (or even greater when the camera is far from level).

depth of field – Canon 70D – shooting video interviews in bright conditions with low aperture

I’m trying to shoot an interview in the middle of the, in the outdoors – which means, it’s very bright.
While keeping the aperture low – to keep the interviewee’s face in focus, with narrow depth of field (2.8f) – and lowering the ISO as much as my Canon 70D allows (100), the image is extremely bright. In fact, the image looks just like a big bright spot, I’m not able to focus on the subject at all.

Which other setting/mode can help me to be able to shoot video interviews with bright daylight, while keeping depth of field?

I’m using a “pancake” lens (Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens) and in accordance with the “180° law” – keeping the shutter speed to 1/50s because I’m shooting 24fps.

depth of field – Canon 70D shooting video in bright conditions with low aperture

I’m trying to shoot an interview in the middle of the, in the outdoors – which means, it’s very bright.
While keeping the aperture low – to keep the interviewee’s face in focus, with great depth of field (2.8f) – and lowering the ISO as much as my Canon 70D allows (100), the image is extremely bright. In fact, the image looks just like a big bright spot, I’m not able to focus on the subject at all.

Which other setting/mode can help me to be able to shoot video interviews with bright daylight, while keeping depth of field?

I’m using a “pancake” lens (Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens) and in accordance with the “180° law” – keeping the shutter speed to 1/50s because I’m shooting 24fps.

Bulb Mode Problems EOS Cannon 70D

I have my 70D On “B” for bulb mode and nothing shows up on the LED screen saying bulb, ive tried some settings and read the manual but it just says turn it to B mode and it should say Bulb on your LED screen. I’ve looked in the Q settings and can’t find anything to do with bulb in my camera. Can someone help please?

troubleshooting – Is there a focusing issue with the Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 on a Canon 70D?

The first sample image in the question is focused well in front of the central pillar. The second is focused well behind the flowers.

You have told us that you are using single point AF but you haven’t told us which AF mode you are using: One Shot, AI Servo, or AI Focus? If you’re trying to focus and recompose using AI Servo the camera will refocus when you move the camera to point at a different spot. If you use AI Focus the camera will initially hold focus as it would in One Shot mode, but if you recompose and hold the camera too long in the new position the camera will sense that your selected AF point is no longer in focus and will switch over to AI Servo.

There appear to be other issues at work that might also be contributing to your results:

Diffraction The 70D is a Canon APS-C camera with 4.1µm pixel pitch. The Diffraction Limited Aperture (DLA) of the 70D is f/6.6. This is the point at which the effects of diffraction begin when viewed at the pixel level. As apertures are narrowed beyond the DLA the results get more and more noticeable at normal viewing sizes. The best way to avoid this is to shoot at around f/8 or wider and at f/6.3 or wider if possible.

Camera movement Not everyone can hold a camera steady enough to use the 1/focal length rule-of-thumb, even when viewing at the standard 8×10 sizes for which it applies. You may get useable results for viewing at smaller sizes, but nowhere near the equivalent viewing size of looking at part of an image at 100% on your monitor. If you have an HD (1920×1080 pixels) monitor that measures 23″ diagonally you are viewing images at 96 ppi. That means an 18MP image viewed at 100% is being magnified at the equivalent of 54×36 inches! That’s 5X the magnification of the standard 8×10 print.

The optical limits of your lens I’d like to know where you read excellent reviews of this lens. I’ve never seen any critical reviews from reputable reviewers written about it that impressed me very much. Before you can blame AF you need to be sure that something else isn’t causing your images to be blurred. To do that you need to eliminate as many of the other possible causes as you can.

  • Mount your camera on a stable tripod, turn off optical image stabilisation, and use a cable release or the self timer to release the shutter. This will help eliminate camera movement as the source of your problem.
  • Shoot under bright enough constant lighting that your shutter speed at ISO 100 can be 1/100 second or faster. Use the fullest spectrum lights available to you. This will further help to eliminate camera movement including vibrations caused by the movement of the camera’s mirror. Properly exposing using low ISO will also help eliminate poor image quality caused by a low signal-to-noise ratio and the resulting noise reduction.
  • Use a flat target that is lined up parallel with your camera’s image sensor and perpendicular to the optical axis of the lens. An easy way to do this is to aim your camera at a flat, stable mirror. Center the viewfinder on the center of reflection of the lens in the mirror. Then tape your focus target onto the mirror being careful not to move the mirror.
  • Use careful manual focus with magnified Live View. Take several samples while refocusing manually between each sample.
  • Repeat the test shots using One Shot AF mode with the single center focus point selected. Move the lens to infinity or minimum focus between each test shot. Use a half shutter press with your cable release to allow the AF to confirm focus before taking the photo.
  • Compare the best of the manually focused shots to the best of the AF shots.

If there is a significant difference then you have an AF issue. If there is not a significant difference then your problem lies elsewhere.

Comment from the OP:

I still doubt that there is a focus issue. I have been using Single shot AF in almost all pictures. And shooting at 4-5 times of 1/focal length at ISO less than 800 I doubt the hardware. Of course its difficult to doubt on ones own abilities! 🙂

Look at the examples you posted carefully at 100% magnification. You can tell by the cobblestones in the first image that focus was missed (based on what you said you attempted to focus). The second image is focused well behind the flowers in the foreground. The clock tower in the background is the most in focus area ofthe image. There are areas in both images that are in focus, they’re just not where you wanted to focus.