Why do Hilton Garden Inns have color printers guests can use freely, but more upscale hotels offer just free black white printing?

This is pure speculation on my part, but here is a very old press release announcing a partnership between “PrinterOn” and HGI to provide “guest printing services” for the entire HGI chain. The emphasis is on remote printing from a room, but it makes sense that PrinterOn would push color printers for the best possible experience.

Obviously, the HGI chain is positioned mid-market with a likely robust business traveler customer base. So, at the time this deal was inked, this probably looked like a smart, forward-thinking move by HGI to attract more business travelers. Why do I call it a “bad deal”? Well, as far as I can tell, PrinterOn did not manage to capture any more chains after this deal, if we can use the Google results for its website as any indication:

Google results for "printeron"

If you browse the website, you will not see any mention of HGI. The only mention I could find is the link highlighted by Google.

Obviously, this implies that other similarly positioned chains did not consider it a good investment, and declined to partner with PrinterOn. Probably, those chains watched the market for a while, noticed that remote/color printing was not really a differentiator, and thanked their lucky stars that they didn’t sink any money into a losing investment.

Now, the interesting question is, “Why is HGI still offering color printing?” Because it looks like they have been in this business for up to 17 years. If it really were not a market differentiator, I would guess that they would have downgraded to B&W after the first generation of printers went kaput and needed to be replaced. I highly doubt most of their original printers have been operating all this time. That implies that they have been replacing the color printers, along with maintaining this unusual, one-off relationship with PrinterOn.

All I can say to that is: “corporate inertia”. Perhaps this aspect of the business is such a small line item expense that nobody wants to bother tinkering with it. Customers have probably come to expect this unusual amenity, even if they are not a significant majority, so it is easier to just pass the costs on to the other customers, as noted in other answers.

Why do Hilton Garden Inns have color printers for guest use, but more more upscale hotels only seem to offer black white printing?

My colleagues and I had this question for long time. We’re not talking about color printers for staff in staff areas that guests can’t use, or how front desk can print in color for you if you ask, but the printers available in the “business center”.

Most hotels have just a black white printer guests can use freely. But every Hilton Garden Inn (“HGI”) we stayed at has a color printer guests can use freely. Every HGI has a color printer in their business center. we’re bewildered. HGI is upper middle scale, not upscale. I googled “Hilton Garden Inn” color printers and saw this on https://hiltongardeninn3.hilton.com/en/about/work-smart.html

  • Color laser printer and photocopy machine

I don’t know if this website constitutes official policy? Does this mean every hgi must have a color printer for guests to use for free?

HGI belongs to Hilton. I consider other fancier Hilton brands first. We’ve stayed at Conrad hotels, Hilton Hotels & Resorts with the blue Hilton logo on the building, Waldorf Astoria in business hubs, right in downtown core. They had just free b&w printing!

Other Hilton brands like Double Tree, Homewood Suites, and Hampton Inn only have free B&W printing available.

Even hotels more upscale than HGI have just free b&w printing. Many Four Seasons, J.W. Marriott, Ritz Carlton, and St. Regis hotels just have b&w printing.

notebooks – Suggest allowing new color brackets

By now I have spent a bit of effort in writing Mathematica notebook for my analysis tasks and appreciate the power of the Mathematica language. At the same time, I also discover that a significant fraction of my time had been spent on balancing the (, ( and { bracket, or scratching my head to discover that the weird results I got were due to improper placement of the closing brackets. I wonder if the code developers have considered allowing different colors to make my chore easier. An example may be that every time an open bracket is invoked, whether (, ( or {, a new and different color is attached to that bracket, and likewise, at closing. In this manner, if an improper placement is made, I would discover it immediately. Just a suggestion.

Why do Hilton Garden Inns have color printers guests use freely, but not more luxury hotels that offer just free black white printing?

My colleagues and I had this question for long time. We’re not talking about color printers for staff in staff areas that guests can’t use, or how front desk can print in color for you if you ask.

most hotels have just a black white printer guests can use freely. But every hilton garden inn (“HGI”) we stayed at has a color printer guests can use freely. Every HGI has a color printer in their business center. we’re bewildered….hgi is upper middle scale, not upscale??!??! I googled “hilton garden inn” color printers and saw this on https://hiltongardeninn3.hilton.com/en/about/work-smart.html

  • Color laser printer and photocopy machine

I don’t know if this website constitutes official policy? Does this mean every hgi must have a color printer for guests to use for free?

HGI belongs hilton. I consider other fancier hilton brands first. We’ve stayed at conrad hotels, hilton hotels & resorts with the blue hilton logo on the building, waldorf astoria in business hubs, right in downtown core. They had just free b&w printing! Other hilton brands equally as or less fancy have just free b&w, like doubletree, homewood suites, hampton.

Even hotels more upscale than hgi have just free b&w printing. Many four seasons, j.w. marriott, ritz carlton, st regis hotels just have b&w printing.

color – Are there current standards or guidelines regarding dark themes / dark modes?

Many people are starting to realize that they prefer what is commonly called “Dark Mode” or “Dark Theme”. That is, light text on a darker background.

As such, developers are now scrambling to create dark themes for their websites, applications, and operating systems.

The resultant set of themes represent a hodgepodge of different ideas of what a “dark theme” should look like. Some are pure white (#FFF) on pure black (#000), while others are variations within those two extremes.

I have been creating (and usability testing) dark themes for over two decades now, and consequently have my ideas and experiences on what works best. But are there now any recommended standards or guidelines for how dark to make the dark backgrounds, and how light to make the light text? What about the specific colors to use, as “dark” and “light” come in millions of different hues?

I found this question, but it only addresses contrast, which is not quite what I’m getting at. Contrast refers to relative intensity variability, whereas I am also inquiring about overall levels of brightness as well as color hues.

Outlook Email Color Categories Changed – How can I resolve and figure out how?

I have a shared mailbox at work and we use color categories to organize how we handle emails. For some reason, a category was swapped out for a new one but I am not sure how it happened. For example, emails that had category A no longer have that category assigned and now have category B.

It occurred in all folders so it is not isolated to one. Additionally, the new category does not even exist in the master category list.

Has anyone encountered this and is there an easy way to resolve? I can’t select multiple and reassigned because the majority of emails have more than one category assigned to begin with.

Environment = Office 365 pluspro account

Thanks!

color – White Point Correction in ColorConvert

One can do color space transformation with Mathematica’s ColorConvert function. This function supports basically all relevant color spaces. However there is one not well documented statement in this function about the chromatic (white point) adaption of transformations which reads

ColorConvert automatically performs chromatic (white point) adaptation. D50 white point is assumed for “XYZ”, “LAB”, “LUV”, and “LCH” and D65 for “RGB”, “CMYK”, “HSB”, and “Grayscale”.

however there is no clear indication if one could modify this default behaviour by specifying another illuminant than D50 or D60 (e.g. A or C) for color transformations. The option WhitePoint which is available e.g. for Chromaticity plot is not working with ColorConvert.

A concrete example would be the transformation from Luv* color space coordinates {70, -60, 80} to XYZ color space which would be the command

ColorConvert({70,-60,80}/100,"LUV","XYZ")

which yields the result XYZColor({0.227989,0.407494,0.008952}) for the D50 illuminant but if one would like to use illuminant e.g. “C” the correct result should be XYZColor({0.225472,0.407494,0.114944}).

Any info on potentially hidden options are welcome…