domain name system – what are the record fields in dig “ANSWER SECTION”?

What are the fields in a dig output ANSWER SECTION:?

$ dig www.stackoverflow.com
…
;; ANSWER SECTION:
www.stackoverflow.com.  138     IN      CNAME   stackoverflow.com.
stackoverflow.com.      51      IN      A       151.101.65.69
stackoverflow.com.      51      IN      A       151.101.1.69
stackoverflow.com.      51      IN      A       151.101.193.69
stackoverflow.com.      51      IN      A       151.101.129.69
…

(snipped output)

I did not find a concise explanation within man dig.

domain name system – why is ssh using cached dns record when dig reports updated version of cname record?

I have a Jenkins pipeline that will start my AWS Ubuntu EC2 instances. This Jenkins pipeline will also update a CNAME record I have for my EC2 instances in route53.

Sometimes there is a long delay in my ability to ssh to the instance via the CNAME. I figured it might be a cache issue, but if I execute dig the-cname.example.com I see the updated versions of the DNS records. Also I have no problem ssh’ing to the new IP and the value of the DNS A record that AWS gave my instance.

Is my ssh client using a cached version of the CNAME?

domain name system – DNS Dig response

I am using DIG command here and i get this back?

;; QUESTION SECTION:

;wilson.wonder.circus. IN A

;; AUTHORITY SECTION: circus. 86400 IN NS hal.sis.circus. circus. 86400 IN NS no.bro.circus.

;; ADDITIONAL SECTION: hal.sis.circus. 86400 IN A 130.237.72.246 no.bro.circus. 86400 IN AAAA 2001:6b0:1::246

Here below is a picture that this response is from

enter image description here

And is comming from a Root Server ?

The question is that how can i know that is a root server that is giving this answer

back from this this returning answer??

dnd 5e – How would you dig through stone to build a cave?

We’re playing Waterdeep: Dragon Heist and we

just got our mansion.

I play a gnomish Artificer/Wizard and want to build my workshop

in the mansion’s basement. But it’s quite small for what I have in mind. Digging seems not to be a viable option to expand the basement, because the ground is pretty hard.

What kind of spell, non-magic or half-magic solution (ie. machines) could do the trick? I come from 3.5e. Back then there were several midlevel options to do that. Stone to mud + Mold Earth. But there is no Stone to mud, or I am not finding it.

Maybe here’s someone who had the same idea and made it work or you just know a way to make it work. I’m very curious about how you achieved this.

FYI Our DM is pretty liberal and let’s us do pretty much, so feel free to stretch the rules. I don’t talk about home-brew, but RAW is not that important with this one: RAW answers are preferred though.

Some Details

The basement is carved into stone and around 6 by 4 squares big and around 10ft high. I’m thinking of doubling it in size… ie 6 by 8 squares.
There are no special constraints besides the stone, which is (according to my DM) “not as hard as granite but still pretty hard”.
We’re playing Dragon Heist very loosely interconnected and can do with our time, whatever we want. The whole campaign is about one year long in-game, so to use that space the time frame should be around one or two months. So I’m not necessarily looking for a quick solution.

Constraints

During this campaign, we will end up with level 8-9 (according to my DM). I plan to have 2 levels of wizard and the rest in artificer. 3rd level spells is the maximum level that I will be able to cast during this campaign.
Right now, I’m broke, but I’m pretty sure that it’ll change in the near future. This goal is more of a long term thing anyway as I already mentioned.

I ask for general possibilities besides the obvious: Just dig, Dude!
At least if it’s not the only possibility. If plain digging is the only way, it’s the only way and I have to dig or let someone else do the digging. Feel free to list all the possibilities that there are in the game or mention some examples out of experience when you tried to accomplish a comparable task.

dnd 5e – How would you dig through stone to build ie. a cave?

We’re playing Waterdeep: Dragon Heist and we

just got our mansion.

I play a gnomish Artificer/Wizard and want to build my workshop

in the mansion’s basement. But it’s quite small for what I have in mind. Digging seems not to be a viable option to expand the basement, because the ground is pretty hard.

What kind of spell, non-magic or half-magic solution (ie. machines) could do the trick? I come from 3.5e… back then there were several midlevel options to do that. Stone to mud + Mold Earth.. but there is no Stone to mud isn’t it? Or am I just blind?

Maybe here’s someone who had the same idea and made it work or you just know a way to make it work. I’m very curious about your answers.

FYI Our DM is pretty liberal and let’s us do pretty much, so feel free to stretch the rules. I don’t talk about home-brew, but RAW is not that important with this one… RAW answers are preferred tho.

linux – What is the difference between dig +tries=x and dig +retries=x?

In cases like that, uou might want to start by specifying which dig version you are talking about.

In my version I have only +tries and +retry (note singular, not plural) and the manpage line on +retry specifically says something related to +tries which is:

This option sets the number of times to retry UDP queries to server to T instead of the default, 2. Unlike +tries, this does not include the initial query.

If you study its source code, at https://gitlab.isc.org/isc-projects/bind9/-/blob/9c8b7a5c450d54332f25830aa47035d87490bb3a/bin/dig/dig.c for the latest version, you can see the truth even explained “simpler” than that (showing the two options act on the same variable in fact)

case 'r':
        switch (cmd(1)) {
(..)
        case 'e':
            switch (cmd(2)) {
(..)
            case 't': /* retry / retries */
(..)
                result = parse_uint(&lookup->retries, value,
                            MAXTRIES - 1, "retries");
                if (result != ISC_R_SUCCESS) {
                    warn("Couldn't parse retries");
                    goto exit_or_usage;
                }

                lookup->retries++;

(..)

case 't':
        switch (cmd(1)) {
(..)
        case 'r':
            switch (cmd(2)) {
(..)
            case 'i': /* tries */
(..)
                result = parse_uint(&lookup->retries, value,
                            MAXTRIES, "tries");
                if (result != ISC_R_SUCCESS) {
                    warn("Couldn't parse tries");
                    goto exit_or_usage;
                }
                if (lookup->retries == 0) {
                    lookup->retries = 1;
                }
                break;

So retry (or retries in fact) sets lookup->retries value and then increment it, while tries just sets the value to what was given. tries gives the total number of attempts to do, while retry gives the amount of attempts to do after a first failure, so the total amount of attempts is that plus one.
Same thing, just different API/semantic.

FWIW, lookup->retries is initialized elsewhere (before the above) like that:

int tries = 3;

(..)

    *looknew = (dig_lookup_t){
(..)
        .retries = tries,

That 3 explains the 2 in the man page as that 2 is the number of retries, so after the first try, hence total of tries by default would be 3. Yes, I do think all of this to be quite convoluted for something trivial 🙂

networking – When dig returns a single A record, but the IP changes between calls, what is this a sign of?

In my internal work network, whenever I launch dig against a particular hostname, I get result similar to this:

;; ANSWER SECTION:
some.internal.host.com.     10  IN  A   10.210.54.121

If I keep spamming the same dig some.internal.host.com command, the response always has a single A record, but the IP address is changing between calls.

I assume it is some form of load-balancing, but the full list of IP addresses in the pool is hidden from inquisitive persons.

What could be the technique that is used here to achieve the described result?

A dig at Ramanujan’s: $sum_{k=1}^{infty} (-1)^{k-1} frac{x^{pk}}{k(k!)^p} sim p ln x +p gamma,~ p>0$

Ramanujan’s claim on page 98, in the book (`Ramanujan’s note book part 1′ by Bruce C. Berndt) is that
∑k=1∞(−1)k−1xpkk(k!)p∼plnx+pγ,p>0(1)
The proposed proofs for p=1,2 are reported to be incorrect. For p>2 the claim (1) has been disproved. In the year 1996, my proofs for p=1,2 were evaluated to be correct by American Math. Monthly, however, similar proofs were told to have been published in the year 1995, somewhere. The result (1) being asymptotic x needs to be positive and large.

The question here is: What is the latest about this result when p∈(0,2) any information or proof is welcome.

domain name system – Dig returns incorrect DNS record, but only on specific network. What’s wrong?

I was trying to SSH into my server at https://myrtlelime.com, but I noticed that I couldn’t (despite being able to visit it on Chrome).

On my local computer, I get this output when running it:

$dig @ns3.he.net p2.myrtlelime.com +short
18.204.152.241

This is incorrect, and looking in my DNS records, I can find no mention of this IP address. I get the same result from another Linux system on my local network, as well as in both Windows and Mac.

However, if I run dig on any of my servers, I get:

$ dig @ns3.he.net p2.myrtlelime.com +short
47.90.8.107

What might be causing this problem? Is my ISP somehow rewriting my DNS records before they arrive?