dnd 5e – Is it possible to escape from a wall of stone spell on the turn it is cast by flying?

The spell wall of stone allows those that might be trapped by it a chance to escape during the action in which it is ‘springing into existence’.

If a creature would be surrounded on all sides by the wall (or the wall and another solid surface), that creature can make a Dexterity saving throw. On a success, it can use its reaction to move up to its speed so that it is no longer enclosed by the wall.

Consider a caster making a wall with a roof to enclose a creature with flying movement capability.

Suppose the horizontal distance from the creature to any point outside the wall is greater than its speed so that even a successful Dex save will not allow it to escape enclosure.

Further suppose that because the wall is wider and longer than it is high, the creature is capable of moving outside the wall vertically, if it is allowed to use its flying speed.

Does “its speed” in the spell description include flying speed?

It seems common sense that if a flying creature could walk out of the area enclosed by the wall as a reaction, it could also fly out of the area, but does RAW allow this? If I understand correctly, using “speed” does not subsume all forms of speed, but means walking speed only, sensu stricto.

“Speed” (PHB) (emphasis mine)

Every character and monster has a speed, which is the distance in feet that the character or monster can walk in 1 round.

“Speed” (MM 8) (emphasis mine)

SPEED A monster’s speed tells you how far it can move on its turn. For more information on speed, see the Player’s Handbook.
All creatures have a walking speed, simply called the monster’s speed. Creatures that have no form of ground-based locomotion have a walking speed of 0 feet.
Some creatures have one or more of the following additional movement modes
FLY
A monster that has a flying speed can use all or part of its movement to fly.

If the description of the wall of stone spell allows only a creature’s speed to be used in its reaction, does “speed” mean only its walking speed since it is not otherwise specified? Although the creature has a flying speed, this is an ‘additional movement mode’ that is not designated by the spell’s permitted use of speed?

Suppose that flying speed may be used to escape the wall. The trigger for permitting the creature’s reactive movement is it being “surrounded on all sides” (sic). If not surrounded, then, it appears that no reaction is permitted. Thus, if flying movement is permitted, does making the wall of stone appear without a roof mean that the creature is not surrounded by the wall, and thus is not permitted its reaction to attempt to escape?

Of course, without a roof the creature could then fly out on its next turn, but a lot could happen between the caster’s turn and the creature’s turn. Interestingly, if flying movement was a permitted form of reaction, the caster could then make a much smaller wall to still enclose the creature. The horizontal distance to the walls could now be made within the distance the creature could walk, and it would still not be allowed a reaction, since leaving off the roof would mean that it was not surrounded.

Is it possible to escape a roofed wall of stone on the turn it is cast by flying?
If so, can this escape be prevented by casting the wall without a roof?

dnd 5e – When a ranged attack deals multiple damage types, can I choose what damage type my Sharpshooter bonus gives?

I am a Blood Hunter (Critical Role class here) with the Sharpshooter and Crossbow Expert feats wielding two hand crossbows. My Crimson Rite allows me to deal an additional 1dx magical damage of some element when I make an attack with a targeted weapon. Sharpshooter simply says that you can add 10 damage to the attack, but it doesn’t specify type. I see a direct comparison to Jeremy Crawford’s ruling on Hunter’s Mark, implying I could choose the damage type of the extra damage. Am I missing some rule that contradicts my assumption?

dnd 5e – Does the Aberrant Mind Sorcerer Subclass’ Warping Implosion Ability Affect the User?

For the Aberrant Mind sorcerer origin, it’s lv 18 ability, Warping Implosion, reads as follows:

You can unleash your aberrant power as a space-warping anomaly. As an action, you can teleport to an unoccupied space you can see within 120 feet of you. Immediately after you disappear, each creature within 30 feet of the space you left must make a Strength saving throw. On a failed save, a creature takes 3d10 force damage and is pulled straight toward the space you left, ending in an unoccupied space as close to your former space as possible. On a successful save, the creature takes half as much damage and isn’t pulled.

So, if you teleport to within 30 feet of where you were before, do you need to make a saving throw and potentially take damage and get sucked closer? I can see this playing out one of two ways

  1. Since the saving throws are made right after you disappear, you haven’t reappeared yet and are thus unaffected

  2. Since it is teleportation, the moment you disappear you also reappear in your new location and thus would be affected

dnd 5e – Do you count as “a creature within X feet” of yourself?

Whether or not you are within X feet of yourself depends on whether you are choosing a target for a spell, or determining if a creature is affected by the area of effect of a spell (or similar).

Targets (PHB 204)

A typical spell requires you to pick one or more targets to be
affected by the spell’s magic.

Targeting Yourself (PHB 204 — continuing the above section)

If a spell targets a creature of your choice, you can choose yourself,
unless the creature must be hostile or specifically a creature other
than you. If you are in the area of effect of a spell you cast, you
can target yourself.

This is the source of why “you are always within 30 feet of yourself” when casting Bless.

When a spell lists a range in its description, it is referring to where you can target a spell, and the caster is included in that range.

Areas of Effect (PHB 204-205)

Spells … cover an area, allowing them to affect multiple creatures
at once. A spell’s description typically has one of five different
shapes: cone, cube, cylinder, line, or sphere. Every area of effect
has a point of origin, a location from which the spell’s energy
erupts.

Cone/Cube/Line

A cone/cube/line’s point of origin is not include in the
cone/cube/line’s area of effect, unless you decide otherwise.

Cylinder/Sphere

A cylinder/sphere’s point of origin is included in the
cylinder/sphere’s area of effect.

So, sometimes the area of effect includes the creature at the point of origin, sometimes it doesn’t. In many (but not all) cases, the caster gets to decide.

Sometimes a spell doesn’t say the shape, it just says “within X feet”.

In those cases, it appears to be consistent that, unless it says otherwise, the target is not included.

However, just a vague “within X feet” would imply to me to indicate a sphere, which means a target is included.

I could find no explicit rules on which to follow, so ultimately it is up to the DM to decide, based on what makes sense for their table.

I personally follow the convention of not including the target of an effect when the words “within X feet” are used without a shape, as it generally results in the least absurd or ridiculous result (like having a Wild Magic Sorcerer immediately be healed for the damage they just took.)

Sword Burst

Sword burst has a range of 5 feet, and the description states that all the creatures in range are targeted. Normally, this would include the caster, which is why it explicitly states the caster is not included in the description. Note that this is NOT an area of effect, so those rules don’t apply. This just falls under the normal Targets rules.

Bless

Bless has a range of 30 feet. Under the Targets rules you are included in that range, so you can target yourself.

Ice Knife

Ice Knife has a range of 60 feet, and a spherical area of effect of 5 feet. As the target is at the point of origin, and a sphere’s point of origin is included in the area effect, the description is simply restating the normal rules for who is included in the damage. The OP says this implies that the target is not normally included, but I think this wording was used simply to help make it clear that the target is affected as well, for those that don’t have the area of effect rules memorized.

Lightning Arrow

For this spell, the range is self — meaning the caster gets to enhance their ranged attacks, not that they are attacking themselves.

There is no area of effect for this spell, but rather the damage description is customized… and vague. This is where I wish the rules provided explicit guidance on when then is an area of effect that doesn’t specify a shape.

The Wild Magic Surge examples in the OP also fall into this category of vagueness, but in each of these cases I would rule that the caster/target is not included in the resulting effect.

dnd 5e – When you learn True Polymorph, do you learn about every creature in existence?

No, but its up to the DM what this means.

There is no rule that states the learning true polymorph gives any knowledge beyond how to cast the spell. That said, it’s going to be up to the DM to determine if your particular choice of creature is permitted in game.

When it comes to (true-)polymorph, I have always ruled that there is a reasonable expectation that the caster has seen or learned about the creature some time in their past. For most creatures my players have ever come up with, this hasn’t been an issue. However, I have ruled against using dinosaurs before, even though they are beasts and appear in the Monster Manual, because they didn’t even exist in my world. There have been a few other times where I have said, “you know about that because you have read the Monster Manual, your character has most likely never seen that, pick a different creature.”

The motivating principle behind ruling this way is that you have to know what your choices are to be able to choose them. This rarely is an issue, and when it has come up, I have never had players get upset over my ruling. Why? I discuss this with my players when they reach a point where they can learn polymorph. I tell my polymorph hopefuls that I intend to rule this way so it is no surprise when the deep-gnome sorcerer that grew up under a mountain is told she cannot become a sperm whale.

dnd 5e – Can the Battle Master fighter’s Precision Attack maneuver be used on a melee spell attack?

No, it can’t be used on a spell attack

Attacks are broken down into weapon attacks and spell attacks.

Each of these can be either a melee attack or a ranged attack. So any attack must be one of the following:

  • Melee Weapon Attack
  • Ranged Weapon Attack
  • Melee Spell Attack
  • Ranged Spell Attack

Except for a few rare cases, if you’re casting a spell that gives you an attack (like in the case of thorn whip), you’ll be making one of the latter-most two. Some non-spell abilities grant spell attacks, too.

In every case, the spell or ability will tell you which of the options above you’re making. In the case of thorn whip, the relevant part of the spell description says:

Make a melee spell attack against the target.

So this means you’re making a spell attack with thorn whip, not a weapon attack. This is because the caster is not physically whipping a vine at an enemy. Rather, the caster is causing vines to magically spring from the ground at the target.

The Battle Master fighter’s Precision Attack maneuver states (PHB, p. 74):

When you make a weapon attack roll against a creature, (…)

This means that it only works with attacks of the first two kinds, where the character is making a conventional attack with a some sort of weapon held in hand(s). Notably, it can be a melee or ranged attack (Precision Attack doesn’t care which); it only matters that it’s a weapon attack, and not a spell attack.

Because thorn whip involves the character making a spell attack, that character can’t use Precision Attack on that attack.

dnd 5e – Does a non-magical +1 weapon get a +1 bonus added to the attack roll only, or the damage roll as well?

Existing items do not offer mundane with +X

There are currently no official items that grant a +1 to either attack or damage that aren’t also magical.

That leaves us without guidance from existing material and whatever your source material you have is going to contain your answer. If this is homebrew (or if there is no stat block), then it is up to the DM to determine the statistics of the weapon.

It will depend on the weapon’s defined stat block

Whether it’s +1 to Attack, Damage, or Attack + Damage will be determined by the stat block of the weapon.

If you are using a published adventure or module, you’ll need to check the stat block for the weapon.

dnd 5e – Understanding the mechanics of a satyr’s Mirthful Leaps trait

(I apologize if this question has been asked in this form or another already.)

I am having an issue calculating how to utilize a Satyr’s Mirthful Leaps trait, and how it would affect the character moving forward, focusing on the math and stats. For this question, I’ll use the satyr monster stat block’s 12 Strength as a fair basis, and assume perfect rolls for maximum distance on the 1d8 from Mirthful Leaps.

The description of the satyr playable race’s Mirthful Leaps trait states (MOoT, p. 25):

Whenever you make a long or high jump, you can roll a d8 and add the
number rolled to the number of feet you cover, even when making a
standing jump. This extra distance costs movement as normal.

While the rules for jumping state the calculation for a long jump as:

When you make a long jump, you cover a number of feet up to your
Strength score if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before
the jump. When you make a standing long jump, you can leap only half
that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a
foot of movement.

So adding everything together as I understand it, a satyr can either clear a 20-foot-long chasm with a 10-foot running start (12 feet based on their Strength score, +8 more from Mirthful Leaps), leaving them 5 feet extra in case something goes wrong; or the satyr can clear a 14-foot-long chasm ((12/2)+8) without a running start.

This means the satyr has the ability to use nearly all their movement in one long jump, correct?

If that is correct, then I have a followup:
If your satyr had to cross a terrain during 1 round by leaping from platform to platform (say, to cross a river, or to avoid the many pit traps in a sealed hallway), how would Mirthful Leaps be applied?

  • Without a running start, would each leap be up to 14 feet long?
  • Would that only apply to the first jump?
  • Or would the “Mirthful Leap” of the prior jump be considered a
    running start for the next, allowing them to jump to the next
    platform up to 20 feet away?

dnd 5e – How many hit dice does a Sidekick start with?

In Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything, the published Sidekick rules say (p. 142):

A sidekick can be any type of creature (…), but the challenge rating
in its stat block must be 1/2 or lower. You take that stat block and
add to it, as explained in the “Gaining a Sidekick Class” section.

The referenced section also says, among other things:

The starting level of a sidekick is the same as the average level of
the group. (…)

Whenever the group’s average level goes up, the sidekick gains a
level. (…)

Whenever the sidekick gains a level, it gains one Hit Die, and its hit
point maximum increases. To determine the amount of the increase, roll
the Hit Die (the type of die appears in the sidekick’s stat block)
(…)

I assume “gaining a sidekick class” counts as “the sidekick gains a level” for the purpose of hit dice, and that isn’t just talking about when the group levels up.
So does the creature start with the number of hit dice listed next to its hit points? Or does it have a pool of “free” hit points that don’t come with hit dice?

For example, a kobold has “5 (2d6 − 2)” hit points listed in its stat block, and it doesn’t mention “hit dice” as such. If a kobold becomes a sidekick to a 1st level party, does it start with a Hit Dice of 1d6 or 3d6?

It seems weird to have a sidekick starting out with 3 hit dice when it’s only 1st level, but at the same time, a 1st-level sidekick kobold with 8 HP and only a 1d6 hit die also looks sort of odd.

dnd 5e – Understanding the mechanics of a satyr’s mirthful leap

I apologize if this question has been asked in this form or another, but I am still having an issue calculating how to utilize a satyr’s mirthful leap, and how it would affect the character moving forward, focusing on the math and stats. For this question, I’ll use the DndBeyond stat block’s 12 Strength as a fair basis and perfect rolls for maximum distance.

The satyr’s mirthful leap is stated as follows:

Whenever you make a long or high jump, you can roll a d8 and add the
number rolled to the number of feet you cover, even when making a
standing jump. This extra distance costs movement as normal.

while the calculation for long jump states:

When you make a long jump, you cover a number of feet up to your
Strength score if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before
the jump. When you make a standing long jump, you can leap only half
that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a
foot of movement.

So adding everything together as I understand it, a satyr can either clear a 20ft chasm with a 10 ft leap (12ft for strength and 8 for their ability), leaving them 5 ft extra in case something goes wrong, OR can clear a 13ft chasm ((12/2)+8) without a running start. This means the satyr has the ability to use nearly all his movement in one long jump, correct?

If that is the case, then:

  1. If your satyr had to cross a terrain during 1 round by leaping from platform to platform (say to cross a river, or avoid the many pit traps in a sealed hallway), how would the mirthful leap be applied? Without a running start, would each leap be up to 13ft? Would that only apply to the first jump? Or would the mirthful leap of the prior jump be considered a running start for the next, allowing them to jump to the next platform up to 20ft away?
  2. Would this not make modifiers like Boots of Striding (tripling jumping distance up to character speed) useless?