dnd 5e – Can I cast Light on an 11 feet pole?

(Note: I do not disagree with the other answers already given. However, what I think they miss is that the OP is thinking specifically about a physical box, rather than a cube in space. A cube in space is a common area of effect for a spell, but I would like to more directly address the OP’s thoughts about the significance of literally putting things inside other things)

No, because objects are solid

This is an interesting puzzle you present. It is clear, as you say, that an 11 foot pole is not a legitimate target for a light spell. And yet, you assume, a 10 x 10 x 10 box is a legitimate target for the spell. Since the pole will clearly fit inside the box, in some sense the box is larger. How can the larger box not be too big while the smaller pole is too big?

First we have to clarify that a 10′ x 10′ x 10′ box is not a legitimate target for the light spell. Each of the 10 x 10 panels on the five or six faces of the box has a diagonal of over 14 feet. They are each larger than ten feet “in any dimension” and thus the spell will not work on such a box. However, this does not invalidate your question.

Suppose instead that we have a box of about 7′ x 7′ x 7′. The diagonals of the faces are now under 10 feet and thus the box itself can have light cast upon it. However, the “space diagonal” (not along the faces but from opposite corners in three dimensions) of such a seven-foot box is over 12 feet. Note that the 11 foot pole cannot be lain flat in the bottom of the box, but it will easily fit inside along the space diagonal. Thus, we are back to your original question, why can light be cast on the larger box but not the smaller pole?

To resolve this, it is necessary to understand that in 5e, objects are solid.

Objects (emphasis mine):

When characters need to saw through ropes, shatter a window, or smash a vampire’s coffin, the only hard and fast rule is this: given enough time and the right tools, characters can destroy any destructible object.
Use common sense when determining a character’s success at damaging an object. Can a fighter cut through a section of a stone wall with a sword? No, the sword is likely to break before the wall does.
For the purpose of these rules, an object is a discrete, inanimate item like a window, door, sword, book, table, chair, or stone, not a building or a vehicle that is composed of many other objects.

While it is not stated explicitly, the emphasis on objects being both discrete and breakable makes it clear that the rules consider objects to be solids, not liquids or gasses.

Thus a 7′ x 7′ x 7′ box is a legitimate target of a sleep spell because any of its solid dimensions is less than 10 feet. It does have a 12 foot space diagonal, but since this is composed of empty air, that doesn’t count as part of the object. This is why your 11 foot pole, on which you cannot cast light, can easily fit inside the 7 foot box, on which you can cast light.

dnd 5e – Can I cast Light on an 11 feet pole in D&D 5e?

The description of the spell Light in D&D 5e says:

You touch one object that is no larger than 10 feet in any dimension. Until the spell ends, the object sheds bright light in a 20-foot radius and dim light for an additional 20 feet. (…)

On one hand, 11 is greater than 10. This would suggest “no”.

On the other hand, I could put a 11-feet pole in a 10 × 10 × 10 feet box. This would suggest “yes”.

I don’t expect that the success of an adventure will hinge on the answer to this question any time soon. But I would like to understand how dimensions are supposed to work.

If my iPad is 5-8 feet away from my mini-fridge which has ice in it, would that cause liquid damage to the iPad?

If my iPad is 5-8 feet away from my mini-fridge which has ice in it, would that cause liquid damage to the iPad? – Ask Different

dnd 5e – Can mage hand to fly up over floor to 10-20 feet?

To float generally means stay in place while not touching the ground, being supported, or suspended. As the spell describes the ability for the hand to move between two points and remain floating, that implies that the hand can also fly.

In past editions there was a distinction between float/hover and flying, as to hover while flying required a skill check, or there were abilities that let you float but not fly.

dnd 5e – Does an enemy have to make the save against the Spirit Guardians spell if the caster moves within 15 feet of the enemy?

Does the Spirit Guardians spell trigger its saving throw if you, as the caster, close the 15-ft. gap?
Or only when the enemy uses its movement to come into the spell’s radius? Spirit Guardians says:

when the creature enters the area for the first time on a turn or starts its turn there, it must make a Wisdom saving throw.

For instance, say I’m 30 feet away, and I use 15 feet of movement to bring myself within range of the monster to put it within the spell’s range.
Does that initiate the “when the creature enters the area for the first time on a turn” trigger for the spell’s saving throw?
Or would the creature have to close that gap itself?

dnd 5e – Can the use of the Crusher feat enable a Sling to force 5 feet of movement on a hit target?

Yes.

Nothing in the feat limits things to melee. Ranged attacks “hit,” and the right ranged weapon, such as the sling you mention, “deals bludgeoning damage,” and so as long as we are talking about a “target [that] is no more than one size larger than you,” you meet all the requirements to trigger Crusher and move the target 5 feet to an unoccupied space.

Ruling that you cannot would be a houserule. Considering how easy it would have been for the authors to write “hit a creature with a melee attack” in the trigger, the fact that they did not seems, to me, to be conspicuous and suggestive that they never meant to limit the feat in that manner. I also see no compelling reason, either for balance or narrative, to implement such a ruling. I could see a DM ruling, for narrative reasons, that a ranged attack can only “push” the target, not pull them closer, though personally I would not.

dnd 5e – Is a character considered within 5 feet of another character if it is diagonal to it? In dnd 5e

Yes.

Given the wording here, I’m assuming you’re using the, technically variant, rules for playing on a grid.

The basic rule for Space, found on p. 191 of the PHB, says (emphasis mine):

A creature’s space also reflects the area it needs to fight effectively. For that reason, there’s a limit to the number of creatures that can surround another creature in combat. Assuming Medium combatants, eight creatures can fit in a 5-foot radius around another one.

When playing on a grid, 8 enemies surrounding a single person is easily represented by a 3×3 square, and would include the ‘diagonal’ spots.

dnd 5e – When sharing the Eyes of Night darkvision, does a creature needs to always be 10 feet close to the cleric to be granted the benefits?

The Eyes of Night feature from the Twilight Domain Cleric, introduced in Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything pg. 34, grants darkvision to the cleric:

You can see through the deepest gloom. You have darkvision out to a range of 300 feet.

It also allows the cleric to share this darkvision with willing creatures:

As an action, you can magically share the darkvision of this feature with willing creatures you can see within 10 feet of you, up to a number of creatures equal to your Wisdom modifier (minimum of one creature). The shared darkvision lasts for 1 hour. (…)

It’s clear that the creature needs to be within 10 feet of the cleric for him to use an action to share the darkvision. But once shared, does that creature needs to be within 10 feet of the cleric to be granted the benefits of the darkvision from Eyes of Night? Since the sharing has a duration 1 hour I’m wondering what if a creature that wandered far away from the cleric would still be granted this benefit.

dnd 5e – What happens when you have a creature grappled and use the Bait and Switch Maneuver to move 5 feet away from the creature?

The Bait and Switch Maneuver (Battlemaster Fighter feature):

Bait and Switch. When you’re within 5 feet of a creature on your turn, you can expend one superiority die and switch places with that creature, provided you spend at least 5 feet of movement and the creature is willing and isn’t incapacitated. This movement doesn’t provoke opportunity attacks.

Roll the superiority die. Until the start of your next turn, you or the other creature (your choice) gains a bonus to AC equal to the number rolled.

Does it just break your grapple since the creature is outside your reach? Does this count as “Moving a Grappled Target” and the creature you’re grappling moves 5 feet with you?

Or does this count as the latter, but since your speed is halved, and the maneuver only allows you to move 5 feet, your speed is 2.5 feet, and if playing on a grid, actually cannot move?

dnd 5e – What happens when you have a creature grappled and use the Bait and Switch to move 5 feet away from the creature?

You can choose to bring the grappled creature with you, but it takes 10 feet of movement.

Bait and Switch says:

When you’re within 5 feet of a creature on your turn, you can expend one superiority die and switch places with that creature, provided you spend at least 5 feet of movement

When you use Bait and Switch, you are using your available movement, so the rules for using it apply, that is, bringing a creature with you costs twice as much movement.

On a 5 foot grid, since you cannot move only 2.5 feet, you must move 5 feet, which costs 10 feet of movement when bringing a grappled creature along.

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