air travel – Flight rebooking free (up to fare differential)

Lufthansa’s website currently says “All our fares are rebookable free of charge – Fare differentials might apply”. See also this summary

I was looking to book a flight flying out in January 2021 with a return in November 2021. Since it is not possible to book a flight that far in advance, I thought of setting the return date to be in July 2021. I will then change the return date in 2021 to November when those bookings are possible. Unfortunately, I have to book the flight now due to bureaucracy that I won’t go into and I cannot book two one-way flights.

How will the airline decide what the fare differential is when I make the date change? If fares are the same price or cheaper in November compared to July (which historically is true), will I get this date change for free or will the airline find a way that ends up making me pay a lot more?

air travel – Flight rebooking free (upto fare differential)

Lufthansa’s website currently says “All our fares are rebookable free of charge – Fare differentials might apply”. See also this summary

I was looking to book a flight flying out in January 2021 with a return in November 2021. Since it is not possible to book a flight that far in advance, I thought of setting the return date to be in July 2021. I will then change the return date in 2021 to November when those bookings are possible. Unfortunately, I have to book the flight now due to bureaucracy that I won’t go into and I cannot book two one-way flights.

How will the airline decide what the fare differential is when I make the date change? If fares are the same price or cheaper in November compared to July (which historically is true), will I get this date change for free or will the airline find a way that ends up making me pay a lot more?

air travel – What happens if a domestic flight lands in a foreign country due to an emergency?

First hand experience from https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g1-i10702-k13222947-o10-Plane_diverted_visa_question-Air_Travel.html:

 I encountered the overnight situation once before. All the passengers were put up in a hotel near the airport. Those of us with permission to enter the country went through normal immigration and got on the hotel bus. The others were escorted as a group to the bus but their passports were taken and held till the next day (not sure who actually had the passports, hotel, airline, authorities). Those of us who had passports could go outside the hotel, those without were not allowed out.

A few other people share their experience there as well. Good summary:

Depends on circumstances, the duration of stay, the infrastructure of the airport and the flexibility and availability of immigration.

Worst case: passenger will stay in a separate room at the airport.

Best case: the receive a visa (eg. transit visa) or a solution is find to let the passenger temporary into the country.

Personally if I was so much suspicious about flight safety, I’d take the boat instead of the passport.

uk – I, a Russian citizen, was denied a flight from Alicante through London without a transit visa

RyanAir is to blame, as you followed the rules precisely for UK landside transit with an EU residence permit. Unfortunately, passenger recourse against such problems is difficult. You could try to claim EC261 compensation for denied boarding, and/or seek passenger rights help from Spanish authorities at seguridadaerea.gob.es.

The rules are shown in Timatic, available at iatatravelcentre.com. I don’t know why another answer incorrectly determined that you need a visa, although the rules are tricky and maybe the airline made the same mistake.

Here’s (in bold) the relevant rule I get from Timatic with origin Spain, destination Russia, transit United Kingdom for less than 24 hours, citizenship Russia, residence permit from Spain. (I also get the same output with origin Russia, destination Spain):

Visa United Kingdom
Visa required.

TWOV (Transit Without Visa):
Nationals of Russian Fed. transiting through London: Gatwick (LGW), Heathrow (LHR) or Manchester (MAN) with a confirmed onward ticket for a flight to a third country on the same calendar day. They must stay in the international transit area of the airport and have documents required for the next destination.

Nationals of Russian Fed. making a landside transit with a confirmed onward ticket for a flight to a third country that departs before 23:59 the next day. They must:
~ have a common format residence permit issued by Spain, and
~ clear immigration, and
~ have documents required for the next destination.

Historic flight date from 2001

This might be better-suited to Aviation.SE or even History.SE as it does not seem to pertain to the needs of a current traveler, but I will say it will take non-trivial effort to confirm flight information from as long ago as 2001.

OAG, the database company that powers almost all airline schedule and flight status information in the world, only has historical flight data going back to 2004. Even aggregated FAA statistics on flight delays and cancellations are only available from 2003, much less for an individual flight.

Historical flight schedules will probably be easiest to locate, even without an OAG subscription. In that era, airlines still published paper timetables, and there are many people around the world who collect them now as memorabilia, and who post scans or photographs of them online. If a PDF timetable was available, someone probably has a copy of it as well. The timetable will usually provide flight numbers, scheduled departure and arrival times, stopover points, equipment types, and meals served.

You might similarly be able to identify the aircraft used because planespotters may have recorded the tail number, although this is obviously very hit-and-miss, especially for smaller airports and smaller airlines.

You can probably make an educated guess as to which terminal the flight operated from based on historical information about the flight and about the airport itself.

But as to whether a specific flight operated and whether or not it was on time, and whether it operated with its normally scheduled crew and aircraft from its normally scheduled terminals, is another matter. You may have few options except to contact the airline itself and ask if it can look up this information for you, or perhaps hope to get in touch with a crew member, airport worker, or other passenger who might have recorded such information in a personal journal and thus be somewhat more reliable than one person’s memory.

air travel – Need to find if an international flight 2 months ago was cancelled

My parents were scheduled on UA8784 from IAD to MUC on July, 24 2020 22:30 and were told it was cancelled due to covid several days beforehand. They were refunded. We were on the same flight but as the Lufthansa partner LH415 IAD (Dulles) to MUC (Munich) July, 24 2020 22:30 and we called to cancel since we already knew the flight would not take off when my parents told us. Now we are told by Lufthansa that we cannot get refunded because we were the ones to cancel and that the flight was on time. How can this be true? The online historic flight data seems to only go back a few days. Thanks!

uk – I was denied a flight from Alicante to London without a transit visa

I am a citizen of Russia, I have a Russian passport, I also have a residence permit for Spain. Yesterday, September 13, 2020, RayanAir staff denied me boarding on flight Alicante – Luton. They didn’t want to read and watch the law, which says that I have the right to transit through Luton.

1 day before, I called and ask in “UK Visas and Immigration Department” By phone 00442034811736. They said that they don’t know if you need a transit visa or not, but you can check it by following the link https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa.

I followed the link https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa
STEP 1. What’s your nationality as shown on your passport or travel document? – RUSSIA
STEP 2. What are you coming to the UK to do? – Transit (on your way to somewhere else)
STEP 3. Where are you travelling to? – Somewhere else
STEP 4. Will you pass through UK border control? – YES

ANSWER: You’ll need a visa to pass through the UK in transit.
BUT You might be eligible for ‘transit without visa’ if:
you arrive and depart by air – YES
have a confirmed onward flight that leaves on the day you arrive or before midnight on the day after you arrive – YES
have the correct documents for your destination (eg a visa for that country) – YES
You must also:
have a common format residence permit issued by an European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland – YES (I have Spain Residence permit common format)

*Common Format Residence Permit – is the new electronic residence permit (PSE), introduced in 2015, which is more secure than the previous one and more difficult to counterfeit. It complies with EC Regulation no. 1030/2002, as amended by the EC Regulation n. 380/2008 and is common format residence permit issued by an EEA Member State or Switzerland.

I want to know who is to blame and what to do in the future in such a situation.

icons – how to Indicate frequent flight routes when booking flights

I’m designing a flow that will reduce the likelyhood of users getting zero results when they search for a flight. When looking at examples of how other airline apps do this, i came accross the following example (scoot airlines app).

I’m trying to figure out if the black airplane icon is an indiates more common flight routes. I find it’s not very intuitive.

What would be a better design approach to execute this solution?

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