Equipment – Are US Travel Forbidden for US Travel?

There are no TSA, FAA, airline, or other rules that would prevent you from getting a wireless mouse (or most other "sending" devices) into an airplane through security.

However, once you're on the plane, there are specific rules for radios that are a wireless mouse.

With very few exceptions, the rules are divided into two flight phases: takeoff / landing and cruise.

No electronic devices may be used during take-off and landing, or especially during the flight, when the aircraft is below 10,000 feet. These include computers, wireless mice, wired mice, kindles, MP3 players, etc. In particular, these devices must be completely switched off. For a computer, this means "off", not just "standby". In the case of a wireless mouse, this would also mean that the mouse would have to be switched off.

Electronic devices can be used during the rest of the flight under certain conditions. The biggest condition is that for every device with a radio transmitter, the transmitter must be deactivated, unless it is a specific approved transmitter type. In some aircraft – mainly those that provide WiFi during flight – computers with WiFi are considered an approved transmission device and can therefore be used. In principle, not all transmitters are permitted on most other aircraft.

This is a transmitter especially for a wireless mouse and therefore may not be used technically during the flight. It must be completely off if it is below 10,000 feet and either be off or have the transmission function disabled above 10,000 feet. Since you can almost certainly not switch off the send function (independently), this means that it must be switched off during the entire flight.

Realistically, I'm sure everyone knows that the power of a wireless mouse isn't enough to interfere with the aircraft in any way, but the approach is to simply ban all sending devices and then only allow those that are adequately tested and approved. (Whether this approach is the right one is a conversation that is best conducted with a beer and not with Travel.SE!)

Permissions – MS Graph present – forbidden 403 error

You can also check the presence of the user with MSGraphClient in SPFx.

Get the Graph Client with:

import { MSGraphClient } from '@microsoft/sp-http';
...

private _graphHttpClient: MSGraphClient;

return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      this.context.msGraphClientFactory.getClient().then(client => {
        this._graphHttpClient = client;
        resolve();
      }).catch(error => {
        console.log(error);
        reject(error);
      });
    });

Then you can get the presence of the user by:

const endpoint: string = `https://graph.microsoft.com/beta/communications/getPresencesByUserId`;
const response: any = await this.props.graphHttpClient.api(endpoint).post({
    "ids": users  //Here you need to pass the user ID's
});
const graphResponse: any = response.value;

Check the complete code in the GitHub SPFx web part example:

reference: Members react with presence.

How to avoid the 403 forbidden error in a WP plugin with Ajax and PHP

I came across the "403 Forbidden error", for which many explanations / solutions can be found in many places, most of them on stack.
However, I am having a hard time solving this error in my situation.
I asked the same question in the WordPress forum, but I received no answer.

I have a WordPress plugin, let's call it "foobar", which processes a shortcode.

The PHP file of my plugin, foobar.php, creates and returns the Javascript code at some point:

$myvariable = '
$.ajax({
 url: "'.plugin_dir_url( __FILE__ ) .'myPHPFunction.php",
 '.type: "post",
 success: function(response) { console.log("return from myPHPFunction.php:"+response); },
 error: function(xhr,status,error) { console.log("status="+status+",xhr="+xhr+",errth="+error);}
 });';

return $myvariable;

The reason why I want to call PHP from the browser with an Ajax call is that the content has to be executed asynchronously when the page is displayed.

The myPHPFunction.php file is in the same directory as the plugin.

myPHPFunction.php is very powerful, it does: 😉


When I open a WordPress page (mytestpage) that contains the shortcode, WordPress creates the Javascript and runs it on an HTML page http://www.mywebsite.com/mytestpage/. I then get the browser console:

status=error,xhr=

403 Forbidden

Forbidden

You don't have permission to access /wp-content/plugins/foobar/myPHPFunction.php on this server.

,errth=Forbidden

Strangely, this happens locally on my development server (I'm using MAMP 5.7). It works on the production site at my provider.
But I have to let it run in development …

If I move myPHPFunction.php to the root of my website and update my code accordingly:

 url: "http://www.mywebsite.com/myPHPFunction.php",

it works ..: abcd is returned in the console …

So it is very likely that the HTML page generated by WordPress and the PHP file are not in the same domain.
Since myPHPFunction.php has to be delivered with my plugin, there is no way to save it outside of the plugin directory.

So I have to resolve the cross-domain call.

I think that solving this problem on the server through configuration (.htaccess) is not safe.
In the case of a plugin, there is no guarantee that my plugin users will not notice this error in their deployment context.
And many users may not know how to work on their Apache server, especially if it is managed by a provider (and may be mutual).
Besides, it's probably not easy: I tried https://enable-cors.org/server_apache.html without success.

The other solution seems to be trying to have the server return headers:

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/10640596/header-set-access-control-allow-origin-in-htaccess-doesnt-work

That didn't work either.
I tried to insert these lines into one of my PHP files without success …

I'm running out of ideas now …

Any help appreciated …

Many thanks

8 – Guzzle POST HTTPS requests return 403. Only forbidden if they are called in PHPUnit tests

On the one hand, I have a remote Drupal 8 (8.8.1) that is operated via HTTPS and has the following endpoint:

MODULENAME.get_notify:
  path: 'MODULENAME/get-notify'
  defaults:
    _controller: 'DrupalMODULENAMEControllerMODULENAMEApiController::get_notify'
    _title: 'Get notification'
  methods:  (POST)
  requirements:
    _access: 'TRUE'

On the client side, I have a Drupal 8 (8.8.2), which is provided via HTTPS and sends a notification via the Guzzle library. This Drupal is local to my computer and is provided via DDEV. Here is the Guzzle petition, which is in a custom module:

$options = (
  'headers' => ('Content-Type' => 'application/json'),
  'json' => $jsonArray,
  'timeout' => 15,
);
$response = $this->httpClient->post($url, $options);

The system works well, except that when running PHPUnit tests (BrowserTestBase) on the affected module, the POST query always returns the following error:

Client error: `POST https://SERVER_DOMAIN/MODULENAME/get-notify` resulted in a `403 Forbidden` response'

Any idea why I'm getting this error message?

Testing – 8 – POST HTTPS requirements for Guzzle POST 403 Only forbidden if called in PHPUnit tests

On the one hand, I have a remote Drupal 8 (8.8.1) that is operated via HTTPS and has the following endpoint:

MODULENAME.get_notify:
  path: 'MODULENAME/get-notify'
  defaults:
    _controller: 'DrupalMODULENAMEControllerMODULENAMEApiController::get_notify'
    _title: 'Get notification'
  methods:  (POST)
  requirements:
    _access: 'TRUE'

On the client side, I have a Drupal 8 (8.8.2), which is provided via HTTPS and sends a notification via the Guzzle library. This Drupal is local to my computer and is provided via DDEV. Here is the Guzzle petition, which is in a custom module:

$options = (
  'headers' => ('Content-Type' => 'application/json'),
  'json' => $jsonArray,
  'timeout' => 15,
);
$response = $this->httpClient->post($url, $options);

The system works well, except that when running PHPUnit tests (BrowserTestBase) on the affected module, the POST query always returns the following error:

Client error: `POST https://SERVER_DOMAIN/MODULENAME/get-notify` resulted in a `403 Forbidden` response'

Any idea why I'm getting this error message?

8 – IE11 triggers 403 forbidden errors

This question is pretty simple because I don't even know where to start.

We have found that a user attempting to navigate to our website (Drupal 8.8.2, using PHP 7.3.15 under Nginx) will receive a 403 forbidden error with "probable reason" given as the website for which requires registration. No errors in this regard are displayed in the Drupal log.

There is no need to log in to view the site. We tested on Windows 10 and 7 and got the same result. Any other browser works fine. It may be server settings that have nothing to do with Drupal, but I wanted to post here and see if anyone found it or knows where to look to solve it.

dnd 3.5e – Can a specialized magician cast a spell from the specialized and forbidden schools?

Dual school spells only appeared in Player manual IIand so is the book that she explains.

In any case, treat these spells as if they belonged to both schools at the same time. Effects that prevent a wizard from accessing a school of a spell with two schools prevent all access to that spell. For example, a specialist cannot learn a spell with two schools if one of the schools of the spell is one of its forbidden schools.

(Player manual II pg. 95)

So no, your magician cannot learn or work Kelgore's Firebolt as a magician. You need a magic item to access it, or multiple classes.