BulletHost is Back with a Full Magazine of Offers in the Netherlands!

Bullet Host has returned with a set of dedicated and reseller hosting offers for you to consider.  We had them on back on January 14, 2021 when they were offering a variety of Netherlands options and now they’ve returned with an even broader spectrum.

Can they really “keep your servers online, no matter what”?  Comments were positive last time, so if you’re looking for shared or dedicated options in the Netherlands, give them a think.

They are registered in Bulgaria (206112702). Their Terms of Service is available on their web site. They accept Bitcoin, Paypal, Credit/Debit cards, and Perfect Money.  You can also talk to them on their Discord.

If you have been a customer of Bullet Host or you give them a try out now, please comment below.

Now read more to see the offers!

Dedicated #1

  • 8GB DDR4 RAM
  • Intel Xeon 6 Core E5-1650-V3 3.50Ghz
  • 2x 480GB SSD
  • Software RAID
  • ~15TB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps uplink
  • 1 IPv4 (Per request)
  • IPMI: yes
  • $75/month
  • (ORDER)

Dedicated #2

  • 16GB DDR3 RAM
  • Intel Xeon 6 Core E5-2640-V1 2.50Ghz
  • 2x 480GB SSD
  • Software RAID
  • ~15TB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps uplink
  • 1 IPv4 (Per request)
  • IPMI: yes
  • $75/month
  • (ORDER)

Dedicated #3

  • 16GB DDR4 RAM
  • Intel Xeon 6 Core E5-2620-V3 2,4Ghz
  • 2x 480GB SSD
  • Software RAID
  • ~15TB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps uplink
  • 1 IPv4 (Per request)
  • IPMI: yes
  • $87/month
  • (ORDER)

Dedicated #4

  • 32GB DDR3 RAM
  • Intel Xeon 8 Core E5-2650-V2 2.60Ghz
  • 2x 1TB SSD
  • Software RAID
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  • 1Gbps uplink
  • 1 IPv4 (Per request)
  • IPMI: yes
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  • (ORDER)

Dedicated #5

  • 32GB DDR4 RAM
  • Intel Xeon 12 Core E5-2680-V3 2.50Ghz
  • 2x 1TB SSD
  • Software RAID
  • ~15TB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps uplink
  • 1 IPv4 (Per request)
  • IPMI: yes
  • $110/month
  • (ORDER)

Dedicated #6

  • 64GB DDR3 RAM
  • 2x Intel Xeon 8 Core E5-2650-V2 2.60Ghz
  • 2x 1TB SSD
  • Software RAID
  • ~15TB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps uplink
  • 1 IPv4 (Per request)
  • IPMI: yes
  • $123/month
  • (ORDER)

Dedicated #7

  • 64GB DDR4 RAM
  • Intel Xeon 12 Core E5-2680-V3 2,50Ghz
  • 2x 1TB SSD
  • Software RAID
  • ~15TB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps uplink
  • 1 IPv4 (Per request)
  • IPMI: yes
  • $135/month
  • (ORDER)

Dedicated #8

  • 64GB DDR3 RAM
  • 2x Intel Xeon 8 Core E5-2650-V2 2.60Ghz
  • 2x 3TB SAS
  • Software RAID
  • ~15TB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps uplink
  • 1 IPv4 (Per request)
  • IPMI: yes
  • $139/month
  • (ORDER)

Dedicated #9

  • 128GB DDR3 RAM
  • 2x Intel Xeon 8 Core E5-2650-V2 2.60Ghz
  • 2x 1TB SSD
  • Software RAID
  • ~15TB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps uplink
  • 1 IPv4 (Per request)
  • IPMI: yes
  • $152/month
  • (ORDER)

Dedicated #10

  • 128GB DDR3 RAM
  • 2x Intel Xeon 8 Core E5-2650-V2 2.60Ghz
  • 2x 6TB SAS
  • Software RAID
  • ~15TB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps uplink
  • 1 IPv4 (Per request)
  • IPMI: yes
  • $176/month
  • (ORDER)

Web Hosting Reseller
Basic

  • 30 Accounts
  • 75GB Disk Space
  • Unlimited Domains
  • Unlimited Sub Domains
  • Unlimited Email Accounts
  • Unlimited FTP Accounts
  • Unlimited MSQL Databases
  • 1Gbps Port
  • Bandwidth Unlimited
  • DMCA 100% Ignored
  • 1 IP Included
  • DirectAdmin Management
  • Location Netherlands
  • Coupon: lowendbox10
  • $15/month
  • (ORDER)

Web Hosting Reseller
Starter

  • 80 Accounts
  • 150GB Disk Space
  • Unlimited Domains
  • Unlimited Sub Domains
  • Unlimited Email Accounts
  • Unlimited FTP Accounts
  • Unlimited MSQL Databases
  • 1Gbps Port
  • Bandwidth Unlimited
  • DMCA 100% Ignored
  • 1 IP Included
  • DirectAdmin Management
  • Location Netherlands
  • Coupon: lowendbox10
  • $20/month
  • (ORDER)

Web Hosting Reseller
Pro

  • 150 Accounts
  • 250GB Disk Space
  • Unlimited Domains
  • Unlimited Sub Domains
  • Unlimited Email Accounts
  • Unlimited FTP Accounts
  • Unlimited MSQL Databases
  • 1Gbps Port
  • Bandwidth Unlimited
  • DMCA 100% Ignored
  • 1 IP Included
  • DirectAdmin Management
  • Location Netherlands
  • Coupon: lowendbox10
  • $25/month
  • (ORDER)

VPS Reseller
KVM Reseller

  • 32GB RAM DDR4
  • Intel Xeon E5-2650 V2 @3.40Ghz
  • 1TB SAS
  • 16 Cores
  • 25 IP’s
  • Bandwidth 15TB
  • Coupon: lowendbox10
  • $60/month
  • (ORDER)

RDP #1

  • 4GB RAM
  • 4GB Swap
  • 4 core Intel Xeon E5-2650 V2 @3.40Ghz Turbo
  • 80GB Storage
  • 6TB transfer
  • 100mbit/s
  • 1x IPv4
  • KVM
  • Coupon: lowendbox10
  • $15/month
  • $160/year
  • (ORDER)

RDP #2

  • 8GB RAM
  • 8GB Swap
  • 6 core Intel Xeon E5-2650 V2 @3.40Ghz Turbo
  • 160GB Storage
  • 12TB transfer
  • 100mbit/s
  • 1x IPv4
  • KVM
  • Coupon: lowendbox10
  • $25/month
  • $255/year
  • (ORDER)

NETWORK INFO:

  • Datacenter: AS208046 Lelystad, Netherlands
  • Test File: 5.253.86.28/100mb.test
  • Ping IP: 5.253.86.28

HOST NODE INFO:

  • 2x Intel Xeon E5-2650 V2
  • 16cores, 32 threads @3,40Ghz turbo
  • 128GB DDR3 ECC
  • 2x 6TB SAS
  • 1Gbps Port

Please let us know if you have any questions/comments and enjoy!

raindog308

I’m Andrew, techno polymath and long-time LowEndTalk community Moderator. My technical interests include all things Unix, perl, python, shell scripting, and relational database systems. I enjoy writing technical articles here on LowEndBox to help people get more out of their VPSes.

pathfinder 1e – Can i get full number of attacks with a thrown returning weapon

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rfid – Is it possible to emulate a full (mifare 1k) card with the ChameleonMini (Rev.G 2)?

I am testing a lock box I own, it uses a Mifare 1k lock with default key, and I use a keyfob to unlock it.

I have both a Proxmark3 and a ChameleonMini.

With the Proxmark3 I am able to both clone the keyfob to a ‘Chinese Magic’ mifare 1k card and open the box with it, as well as emulate the card with the proxmark3 and open the box.

I have figured out using the Mifare1k sniffer ChameleonMini function to pull keys from the reader itself.

However, with the ChameleonMini, I seem to only be able to clone the UID, and read the data with the keys? When I emulate the card, it only gives the UID, I can’t find a way to replay the entire card like the proxmark does….

While the emulated card does scan (the UID) with the NFC reader on my phone, the lock box doesn’t respond to the ChameleonMini what-so-ever.

is it even possible to emulate the full card with the ChameleonMini? Or only the UID?

spells – How can a Psionic Manifester get full Bab reliably

I’m currently trying to make a Talshatora Monk/Erudite multiclass work, partially as a challenge and partially because I want to play a psionic Gish. The issue is that, under the constraints i’m operating under, getting a BaB high enough to function in melee will be difficult. So, I’ve looked into somehow persisting or otherwise gaining a at will or permanent Divine Power like effect.

My build goals are 9th level psionic powers with Divine Power, or barring that Transformation. These are the constraints and rules assumptions i’m working under for this game.

  • Prestige classes that advance manifesting are ruled psionic classes so having more levels in one of them than my Erudite level will cause issues, this is why Slayer is unfortunately off the table.
  • Spell to Power Erudite is in use however spells not normally available to arcane classes, such as Divine Power being gained by the Arcane Disiple feat, are not easily obtainable. They can be gained theoretically but aren’t reliable. So while Persist Power Divine Power is an option in theory it’s not something I can bank on.
  • Custom Item creation Rules, specifically Custom Wondrous Items of Divine Power or infinite use resetting traps of Divine Power, are off the table.
  • Permanent Runes of Divine Power are allowed, but the expense obviously makes it a less than ideal option.
  • All first party books, as well as dragon and dungeon magazine, are allowed. The game is also fairly high optimization with one other player using Astral Seed to transform into a dragon, this however doesn’t work on spells that don’t change your body. So I can use that strategy to make divine power permanent. (Unless I can find a convincing argument for why it would)
  • There is effectively no cap on how much of our WBL can be spent on a single item.

My current plans if I can’t find a better solution is to either get Divine Power as a psionic power somehow and persist it or get the extend and persist spell feats and apply persist spell to a wand of Divine Power using a schema of metamagic item.

Server Trafficweb :- 2x Intel Xeon CPU | 8 User MAX | 64 GB RAM | 1 Gbps Full Duplex | Admin Encoding RDP | Storage RDP

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Getting Started With the Dolphin: MySQL 101 – Full Setup and How to Guide

How to Setup MySQL - A Full Setup and How to GuideMariaDB and PostgreSQL are the two leading SQL databases. Both adhere to many ANSI SQL standards, but these ANSI standards don’t specify all behaviors. The SQL statement themselves (such as SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE) are the areas where they have the most commonality. Where they differ the most is in their DDL (data definition language) commands, and the administrative/server components. In this tutorial, we’ll cover MySQL.

MariaDB is a fork of MySQL. MySQL was originally an independent company but when they were acquired by Oracle, some users got the willies and forked the project to start MariaDB. Both products (MySQL and MariaDB) have continued to be developed. In this tutorial, we’ll focus on MariaDB, which is the more license-friendly option. Note that while the product is called MariaDB, you will still see the term “mysql” in many areas, such as directory paths (/var/lib/mysql), etc.

To install MariaDB on Debian systems:

apt-get install mariadb-server

On CentOS systems:

yum -y install mariadb-server

After installing MariaDB, you should immediately run mysql_secure_installation to secure the MySQL configuration. You should set a root password and answer yes to all questions.

# mysql_secure_installation 
NOTE: RUNNING ALL PARTS OF THIS SCRIPT IS RECOMMENDED FOR ALL MariaDB
      SERVERS IN PRODUCTION USE!  PLEASE READ EACH STEP CAREFULLY!

In order to log into MariaDB to secure it, we'll need the current
password for the root user.  If you've just installed MariaDB, and
you haven't set the root password yet, the password will be blank,
so you should just press enter here.

Enter current password for root (enter for none): 
OK, successfully used password, moving on...

Setting the root password ensures that nobody can log into the MariaDB
root user without the proper authorisation.

Set root password? (Y/n) y
New password: 
Re-enter new password: 
Password updated successfully!
Reloading privilege tables..
 ... Success!

By default, a MariaDB installation has an anonymous user, allowing anyone
to log into MariaDB without having to have a user account created for
them.  This is intended only for testing, and to make the installation
go a bit smoother.  You should remove them before moving into a
production environment.

Remove anonymous users? (Y/n) y
 ... Success!

Normally, root should only be allowed to connect from 'localhost'.  This
ensures that someone cannot guess at the root password from the network.

Disallow root login remotely? (Y/n) y
 ... Success!

By default, MariaDB comes with a database named 'test' that anyone can
access.  This is also intended only for testing, and should be removed
before moving into a production environment.

Remove test database and access to it? (Y/n) y
 - Dropping test database...
 ... Success!
 - Removing privileges on test database...
 ... Success!

Reloading the privilege tables will ensure that all changes made so far
will take effect immediately.

Reload privilege tables now? (Y/n) y
 ... Success!

Cleaning up...

All done!  If you've completed all of the above steps, your MariaDB
installation should now be secure.
Thanks for using MariaDB!
#

MariaDB is installed with reasonable defaults.

On CentOS systems, /etc/my.cnf is the main configuration file, and it sources files in /etc/my.cnf.d. There’s no need to edit /etc/my.cnf. Instead, edit the relevant files in /etc/my.cnf.d.

On Debian systems, configurations are stored in /etc/mysql.  mariadb.cnf is the “mother” file, which sources files from /etc/mysql/conf.d/mariadb.  /etc/mysql/mariadb.cnf explains priority with a refreshing clarity the, ahem, “enterprise” distribution seems incapable of:

# The MariaDB/MySQL tools read configuration files in the following order:
# 1. "/etc/mysql/mariadb.cnf" (this file) to set global defaults,
# 2. "/etc/mysql/conf.d/*.cnf" to set global options.
# 3. "/etc/mysql/mariadb.conf.d/*.cnf" to set MariaDB-only options.
# 4. "~/.my.cnf" to set user-specific options.

MariaDB starts and starts like a normal systemd service:

systemctl start mariadb
systemctl stop mariadb

Note that for legacy compatibility purposes, “systemctl start|stop mysql” continues to work.

Normally you would connect to MariaDB with a command like this:

$ mysql -u username -p somedb
Reading table information for completion of table and column names
You can turn off this feature to get a quicker startup with -A

Welcome to the MariaDB monitor.  Commands end with ; or g.
Your MariaDB connection id is 45708
Server version: 10.3.17-MariaDB MariaDB Server

Copyright (c) 2000, 2018, Oracle, MariaDB Corporation Ab and others.
Type 'help;' or 'h' for help. Type 'c' to clear the current input statement.
MariaDB (employees)>

If connecting from an application, note that by default PostgreSQL runs on port 3306.

In MySQL, the system ‘root’ account is the superuser.

mysql -u root -p

And then enter your password when prompted.

If you are scripting MariaDB (perhaps for backups), you can eliminate the need to enter a password. To do this, create a .my.cnf password in the relevant user’s home directory. It must be owned by that user and set to read/write by that user only:

# touch /root/.my.cnf
# chmod 600 /root/.my.cnf

Then populate it with something like this:

(client)
password = "my-password"

Now you can simply call “mysql” and (if you’re root) you’ll be logged in as root.  Note that if you execute “mysql -p”, MariaDB will ask for your password since you asked it to.

MariaDB supports the venerable mysqldump program, which dumps your database to a .sql file that contains the SQL instructions for recreating the database. Basic usage for dumping a database called ‘mydb’ looks like this:

mysqldump mydb > /some/path/mydb.sql

To dump all databases:

mysqldump -A > /some/path/all.sql
# mysql
Welcome to the MariaDB monitor. Commands end with ; or g.
Your MariaDB connection id is 45704
Server version: 10.3.17-MariaDB MariaDB Server

Copyright (c) 2000, 2018, Oracle, MariaDB Corporation Ab and others.

Type 'help;' or 'h' for help. Type 'c' to clear the current input statement.

MariaDB ((none))> create database new1;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.000 sec)
MariaDB ((none))> use new1;
Database changed
MariaDB (new1)>

MariaDB users are in the form “user@place” where “place” can be a hostname or “%” for wildcard. We typically create a user and grant the user permission a database:

MariaDB (new1)> create user 'someone'@'localhost' identified by 'something';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.000 sec)

MariaDB (new1)> grant all on new1.* to 'someone'@'localhost';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.001 sec)

We can also do this in one step:

MariaDB (new1)> grant all on new1.* to 'someone'@'localhost' identified by 'something';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.000 sec)

Regardless of how you do it, be sure to flush privileges when you’re done:

MariaDB (new1)> flush privileges;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.001 sec)

To list databases, use the show databases command:

MariaDB (new1)> show databases;
+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| employees          |
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| new1               |
| performance_schema |
| tester             |
+--------------------+
6 rows in set (0.001 sec)

To list tables, use show tables:

MariaDB (employees)> show tables;
+----------------------+
| Tables_in_employees  |
+----------------------+
| current_dept_emp     |
| departments          |
| dept_emp             |
| dept_emp_latest_date |
| dept_manager         |
| employees            |
| salaries             |
| titles               |
+----------------------+
8 rows in set (0.000 sec)

Creating tables is a very standard SQL command. In this case, we are setting the ‘id’ column to be the primary key and also declaring it as auto-increment, which means that it will automatically increase with every insert.

CREATE TABLE superheroes (
id integer primary key auto_increment,
hero_name varchar(30),
secret_identity varchar(30),
team varchar(30)
);

MariaDB (heroes)> CREATE TABLE superheroes (
-> id integer primary key auto_increment,
-> hero_name varchar(30),
-> secret_identity varchar(30),
-> team varchar(30)
-> );
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.006 sec)

We’ll add some rows, but we don’t need to include the ‘id’ column in our insert statement because it will auto-increment for us. The “START TRANSACTION” is optional, as we’ll explain next;

START TRANSACTION;
INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Iron Man', 'Tony Stark', 'Avengers');
INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Captain America', 'Steve Rogers', 'Avengers');
INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Thor', 'Donald Blake', 'Avengers');
INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('She-Hulk', 'Jennifer Walters', 'Avengers');
INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Wolverine', 'Logan', 'X-Men');
INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Cyclops', 'Scott Summers', 'X-Men');
INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Shadowcat', 'Kitty Pryde', 'X-Men');
INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Colossus', 'Piotr Rasputin', 'X-Men');

MariaDB (heroes)> start transaction;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.000 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Iron Man', 'Tony Stark',
'Avengers');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.002 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Captain America', 'Steve
Rogers', 'Avengers');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.001 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Thor', 'Donald Blake', '
Avengers');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.001 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('She-Hulk', 'Jennifer Wal
ters', 'Avengers');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.001 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Wolverine', 'Logan', 'X-
Men');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.001 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Cyclops', 'Scott Summers
', 'X-Men');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.001 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Shadowcat', 'Kitty Pryde
', 'X-Men');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.001 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> INSERT INTO superheroes (hero_name, secret_identity, team) VALUES ('Colossus', 'Piotr Rasput
in', 'X-Men');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.001 sec)

We’re in the middle of a transaction thanks to the START TRANSACTION statement. From our perspective, this is what the superheroes table looks like:

MariaDB (heroes)> select count(*) from superheroes;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 8        |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.000 sec)

However, logging in from another session and running the same query produces this:

MariaDB (heroes)> select count(*) from superheroes;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 0        |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.000 sec)

This is because we haven’t committed the data yet. Let’s do so.

MariaDB (heroes)> commit;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.002 sec)

Now both queries show:

MariaDB (heroes)> select count(*) from superheroes;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 8        |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.001 sec)

If you had not used “START TRANSACTION”, then every command would immediately commit.

Let’s try one more transaction. I’m going to delete one of the heroes:

START TRANSACTION;
DELETE FROM superheroes WHERE hero_name = 'Thor';

MariaDB (heroes)> start transaction;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.000 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> DELETE FROM superheroes WHERE hero_name = 'Thor';
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.001 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> select count(*) from superheroes;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 7        |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.000 sec)

However, in the other session, I still see all rows:

MariaDB (heroes)> select count(*) from superheroes;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 8        |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.000 sec)

I could COMMIT in session #1, but I also have the option to ROLLBACK – in other words, abandon my changes. In this case, it’s only one statement, but I could have hundreds or thousands of statements pending commit. A COMMIT would apply them all, and a ROLLBACK would roll them all back. In this case, I’ll rollback:

MariaDB (heroes)> rollback;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.002 sec)

MariaDB (heroes)> select count(*) from superheroes;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 8        |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.001 sec)

To query data, we use SELECT in the from “SELECT (columns) FROM (table)” and then optionally adding clauses to filter data (WHERE), group data (GROUP BY), and sort data (ORDER BY). Some examples:

MariaDB (heroes)> select secret_identity from superheroes where hero_name = 'Iron Man';
+-----------------+
| secret_identity |
+-----------------+
| Tony Stark |
+-----------------+
1 row in set (0.000 sec)

I can use “*” to mean all columns:

MariaDB (heroes)> select * from superheroes where hero_name = 'Thor';
+----+-----------+-----------------+----------+
| id | hero_name | secret_identity | team     |
+----+-----------+-----------------+----------+
| 3  | Thor      | Donald Blake    | Avengers |
+----+-----------+-----------------+----------+
1 row in set (0.000 sec)

Of course, I may have many rows:

MariaDB (heroes)> select hero_name, secret_identity from superheroes where team = 'Avengers' order by hero_nam
e;
+-----------------+------------------+
| hero_name       | secret_identity  |
+-----------------+------------------+
| Captain America | Steve Rogers     |
| Iron Man        | Tony Stark       |
| She-Hulk        | Jennifer Walters |
| Thor            | Donald Blake     |
+-----------------+------------------+
4 rows in set (0.001 sec)

I can also use various database functions to summarize data:

MariaDB (heroes)> select team, count(*) from superheroes group by team order by team;
+----------+----------+
| team     | count(*) |
+----------+----------+
| Avengers | 4        |
| X-Men    | 4        |
+----------+----------+
2 rows in set (0.001 sec)

MariaDB uses a standard DELETE statement:

MariaDB (heroes)> delete from superheroes where team = 'X-Men';
Query OK, 4 rows affected (0.002 sec)

Perhaps She-Hulk decides to leave the Avengers (nerds: she joined in Avengers #221 and left in Avengers #243):

MariaDB (heroes)> update superheroes set team = NULL where hero_name = 'She-Hulk';
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.002 sec)
Rows matched: 1 Changed: 1 Warnings: 0

MariaDB (heroes)> select hero_name from superheroes where team = 'Avengers' order by hero_name;
+-----------------+
| hero_name       |
+-----------------+
| Captain America |
| Iron Man        |
| Thor            |
+-----------------+
3 rows in set (0.000 sec)

Learning More

raindog308

I’m Andrew, techno polymath and long-time LowEndTalk community Moderator. My technical interests include all things Unix, perl, python, shell scripting, and relational database systems. I enjoy writing technical articles here on LowEndBox to help people get more out of their VPSes.

json rpc – Connecting a Hardware wallet to a full node

I’m trying to connect my hardware wallet to my personal full node for the sake of privacy. I need to know the node’s IP, port, and RPC credentials. The first two are easy, I can see my full node in bitcodes.io that’s up and running. I added the

rpcuser=xxx
rpcpassword=****

to the bitcoin.conf file. But When I try to connect through my hardware wallet application, it says: The node is not reachable. I’m not sure whether the bitcoind is reading the rpc inputs from the config file or not. Is there anyway that I could try to reach to my node to make sure it’s reachable using the rpc credentials.

Here is the content in the bitcoin.conf file:

prune=0
txindex=1
server=1
daemon=1
rpcuser=letsbegin
rpcpassword=*****
externalip=xx.xx.xx.xx