Infinite user input Java

Actually, my requirement is that I need all column names from Oracle and save them in a text / JSON file. The entire object must be provided by the user. To meet this requirement, I have used the following code. E-mail problem with the following code is that it does not provide the user with a pop-up for input and is stuck in an endless loop.

Can you please give us your expert opinion?

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.io.PrintStream;
import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Paths;
import java.sql.Connection;
import java.sql.DriverManager;
import java.sql.ResultSet;
import java.sql.ResultSetMetaData;
import java.sql.statement;
import java.util.scanner;
public class MetaDataAuto {

public static void main (String args[]) triggers IOException {
PrintStream fileOut = new PrintStream ("./ out.json");
String s1 = "";
do
{
System.out.println ("Enter the object name and press Enter");
String x = new string (Files.readAllBytes (Paths.get ("./test.txt")));
BufferedReader reader =
new BufferedReader (new InputStreamReader (System.in));
String object = reader.readLine ();
System.out.println ("Enter the name of the Redshift object and press Enter");
String redshift = reader.readLine ();
To attempt
{
Class.forName ("oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver");
Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection (
"Connect string");
Statement stmt = con.createStatement ();
ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery ("select * from Object);
ResultSetMetaData rsmd = rs.getMetaData ();
int columnCount = rsmd.getColumnCount ();
System.setOut (fileOut);
System.out.println (x);
System.out.println ("" + redshift + "");
System.out.println ("" + "cols" + "" + ":" + "[ ");
for (int i = 1; i <= columnCount; i ++) {
String name = rsmd.getColumnName (i);
System.out.println ("" + name + "" + ",");
}

} catch (exception e)
{
System.out.println (e);
}

} while (s1.equalsIgnoreCase ("Y"));
}




}

I expect the user input to appear
Edition: – Infinite loop

javascript – appendChild () creates infinite elements instead of replacing them

appendChild () creates an infinite number of elements each time a function is executed. It should replace the element every time the function is executed. Can someone tell me where I am wrong?

Password:


Function test ()
{
var nas = window.document.getElementById ("tano")
var data = new Date ()
var ano_atual = Number (data.getUTCFullYear ())
var ano_nas = Number (nas.value)
var msg = window.document.getElementById ("p_img")
var res = window.document.getElementById ("div_image")

if (nas.value.length == 0 || nas.value> current_year) {
window.alert ("This date is invalid.  nCheck the date and try again!")
} else {
var sex = window.document.getElementsByName ("sex")
Age = year-year-year
var gender = ""
var img = document.createElement ("img")
img.setAttribute ("id", "image")
if (sex[0]checked) {
if (age <= 10)
img.setAttribute ("src", "boy_jovem.png")
Gender = "boy"
} else if (age <= 18) {
img.setAttribute ("src", "adolescent boy.png")
Gender = "boy"
} else if (age <= 40) {
img.setAttribute ("src", "man_adulto.png")
Gender = "man"
} else if (age <= 60) {
img.setAttribute ("src", "my_message_man.png")
Gender = "man"
}


}

if (sex[1]checked) {
if (age <= 10)
img.setAttribute ("src", "chica_jovem.png")
Gender = "girl"
} else if (age <= 18) {
img.setAttribute ("src", "adolescent girl.png")
Gender = "girl"
} else if (age <= 40) {
img.setAttribute ("src", "lady_adulto.png")
Gender = "woman"
} else if (age <= 60) {
img.setAttribute ("src", "melher_meia_ity.png")
Gender = "woman"
}
}


}
msg.innerHTML = `We've reviewed a $ {gender} of $ {age} years.`
res.appendChild (img)

}


real analysis – question of the convergence of an infinite number of rows with special conditions

I try to think about the following types of problems, and in fact, if we could get some results, they could be used in math, even some unsolved problems.

I'm not going to write about possible applications right now, I'll go straight into a problem.

I study (though there are no conclusions yet) the sum $$ sum_ {3 leq a_ {1,1}, a_ {1,2} <+ infty} frac {1} {a_ {1,1} a_ {1,2}} + sum_ {3 leq a_ {2,1}, a_ {2,2}, a_ {2,3} <+ infty} frac {1} {a_ {2,1} a_ {2,2} a_ {2,3 }} + … + sum_ {3 leq a_ {n, 1}, a_ {n, 2}, … a_ {n, n + 1} <+ infty} frac {1} {a_ {n, 1} a_ {n, 2}, … a_ {n, n + 1}} + … $$,

from where $ {a_ {1,1} a_ {1,2} } $ and $ {a_ {2,1} a_ {2,2} a_ {2,3} } $ and and $ {a_ {n, 1} a_ {n, 2}, … a_ {n, n + 1} } $ and … all have a density of zero $ mathbb N $ and every term of each sequence is odd.

Does all this mean convergence of this infinite sum of infinite sums?

real analysis – question of the convergence of an infinite number of rows with special conditions

I try to think about the following types of problems, and in fact, if we could get some results, they could be used in math, even some unsolved problems.

I'm not going to write about possible applications right now, I'll go straight into a problem.

I study (though there are no conclusions yet) the sum $$ sum_ {3 leq a_ {1,1}, a_ {1,2} <+ infty} frac {1} {a_ {1,1} a_ {1,2}} + sum_ {3 leq a_ {2,1}, a_ {2,2}, a_ {2,3} <+ infty} frac {1} {a_ {2,1} a_ {2,2} a_ {2,3 }} + … + sum_ {3 leq a_ {n, 1}, a_ {n, 2}, … a_ {n, n + 1} <+ infty} frac {1} {a_ {n, 1} a_ {n, 2}, … a_ {n, n + 1}} + … $$,

from where $ {a_ {1,1} a_ {1,2} } $ and $ {a_ {2,1} a_ {2,2} a_ {2,3} } $ and and $ {a_ {n, 1} a_ {n, 2}, … a_ {n, n + 1} } $ and … all have a density of zero $ mathbb N $ and every term of each sequence is odd.

Does all this mean convergence of this infinite sum of infinite sums?

Web App – scroll bars for an infinite layer

I design a web application to plan Minecraft builds. Basically, it's a pixel editor, except that each tile has a texture instead of a color. I turn to desktop browsers, although I want to keep tablets in mind.

One of my goals is to present the canvas as an infinite plane. (This is a key feature that distinguishes this design from existing alternatives.) The Minecraft world is infinite, so it makes no sense to specify a finite size in advance, and it's annoying a pointless hurdle.)

The canvas is zoomable and must be "scrollable" in both dimensions. The user should be able to view and edit any part of the canvas – even a million tiles away from the origin.

Scroll bars do not work perfectly here. The artboard has neither beginning nor end, and the origin point is not important to users, so there are no objective reference points. The filled-in areas of the canvas can serve as useful subjective reference points, and a scroll bar can be useful for navigating those areas.

I read a great question about infinite scrolling patterns, and although she did not deal with this particular case, it was very enlightening. After some consideration, I think that the application must support:

  • Move the view to any given point.
  • Move / zoom the view to include the entire padded area.
  • Move the view precisely within and immediately outside the populated area (for example, a screen view, a measure that depends on the zoom).

A traditional scroll bar also gives the size of the view in relation to the entire document, which does not make sense to us. It might be useful to specify the size of the view in relation to the populated area, but I am not convinced.

Moving to a point or zooming / scrolling to see all the content can be implemented using buttons, menu commands, or whatever. The trick is to find a surface for scrolling behavior that is intuitive to use but meets the demands of the infinite level.

What I'm thinking at the moment is a kind of "peeling bar". Visually, it is a scroll bar (and can be implemented with native widgets). The button is locked in the middle when the user is not scrolling. If the user moves the button manually, the view is scrolled accordingly, and when it releases, the button jumps back to the center. This allows precise linear scrolling despite the lack of objective reference points.

As indicated, the user can not scroll over an unlimited distance in a single operation. To support this, the canvas area may be scrolled until the user releases the button or moves it away from the end.

Are there any good examples of infinite layer scrolling? And does the widget that I propose seem to be a reasonable compromise?

Infinite Capital – Infinitecapital.biz

I am not the administrator.
Listed on the monitor. smile.gif

Begin: 08/06/2019

Register here

Zoom out

Over:
Welcome to Infinite Capital
YOUR PROFIT INCREASES EVERY DAY
With our cooperation, you can invest in the crypto industry in the shortest possible time without having economic knowledge and guaranteed profits. Take action now to open an account

Plans:
4% daily for 35 days – 140% profit
5% daily for 35 days – 175% profit
6% daily for 35 days – 210% profit

Recommendation Commission:
5%

Payment processors:
Payeer, PerfectMoney, Bitcoin, Ethereum, Advcash, Litecoin

Minimum deposit:
$ 5

Properties:
DDOS Protection
SSL
Custom script
Unique design
Registered company

Our deposit:
IPB Image

Register here

procedural generation – How can I produce procedurally placed points in an infinite world?

What you want to do is exploit the fact that a pseudo-random number generator that uses a seed value will always reproduce the same "random" set of numbers. You can read a bit about it at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Random_seed

Looking at an input area, look for a way to use the information in this area to create a seed that gives you a unique starting value for each area. This can be based, for example, on the coordinate of the area.

If you want to generate your procedural points for the range at a seed, set the seed value and create your set of point coordinates from a sequence of random numbers created from the seed.

The only thing you need to be careful about is having to use the random number generator to generate your sequence at the same time each time to ensure repeatability.

A nice twist here is that you can have a "master seed" for your world that is used to generate every surface seed. So when you receive a Master Seed, you can reproducibly recreate a whole unique world. I assume that Minecraft works so with world names.

I just saw the image you uploaded, which makes a couple of things clear. My answer is not necessarily exactly how you generate these points, but how to ensure that procedurally generated points are reproducible each time you need to generate them.

Why can not an infinite loop be detected with GHCi under Windows?

The comment seems to be outdated. I can confirm that in GHCi 8.6.4 on Linux, entering this code in an interactive command prompt simply stops working.

Besides, if you take the program:

main = let x = x in x

and compile it with GHC 8.6.4 (again under Linux), then it compiles without optimization, hangs while compiled with it -O2 it prints:

Loop: <>

It does not seem to matter if it's a compiled thread or not.

The bottom line is that GHC gives no real guarantees as to which endless loops it may "catch" or not. This may change from version to version and with different optimization settings, as well as in interactive and non-interactive code, and may vary from architecture to architecture.

There is nothing inherent in Windows that would prevent this recognition process, and there is no particular reason why the Windows and Linux versions of a program would behave differently. If the comment was correct at some point in time, it was probably a subtle difference in code generation on Windows that led to the difference in observed behavior.