lighting – Unity – How to get nicer shadows from distant point lights?

Increase Range.

If looks too bright decrease Intensity.

enter image description here

Range 130, Intensity 1.3, Anti aliasing 8x multi, Shadow Res Very high.
Distance between light and shadow receiver 30 Unit. Distance between light and shadow caster 25 Unit.

Point light is not usually used for distant lighting. Use a Spot light instead. Result will be better.

lighting – Cross-polarization with multiple lights, multiple cameras on large objects in 360

I’m trying to utilize cross-polarization to eliminate reflections on objects. I use linear polarizing filters on multiple light sources (polarized lights are my only light sources, no bounce lights) and a circular polarizer filter (CPL) on the camera lens to achieve cross-polarization. The object is on a turntable so I can shoot 360 photos without moving the camera around.

I’m using Canon EOS 5D Mark IV, 24-105 mm & 16-35 mm zoom lenses, with 4+ 1000W tungsten lights. I’m currently at the testing phase, I will eventually scale the whole setting up for objects as large as 10 feet wide.

I’ve lined everything perfectly so there are no reflection on even somewhat glossy objects. After that I start to move the camera on the vertical plane (up and down) and tilting the aim angle to aim at the object, I don’t move the lights, only the camera.

Here are the issues I ran into when I do so:

  1. When I changed the camera heights, I lost the cross-polarization. If I rotate the CPL, it will only get some lights into the cross-polarization, not all of them. I thought the polarization will offset by the same amount when viewing from different angle, but it seems they are offset by different amount.
  2. When I start to rotate the object on a turntable (it is not perfectly centered, so it will rotate off the vertical axis ), I lose cross-polarization on some lights, which light to lose the cross-polarization depending on the rotation of the subject.

I would like to know how the above happen and how to solve these issues. Also, any practical suggestions on how to do a larger version (10 feet wide) of the setup while still maintaining cross-polarization across the subject, preferably with multiple light sources & multiple cameras (angles)?

Thanks in advance!

photo editing – How to create a more natural look using Strobe lights for watch photography?

thanks in advance for any help provided. I am fairly new to product photography and recently ditched my lightbox for strobe lights to create a more natural and true to the eye look on my watches. The lightbox lighting gave more a dark greyish tone which did not show the true color and texture of the watches. Now I have a new setup using strobe lights, but I am still not getting the correct lighting on my products (see purple pic below). 2nd photo is the goal. Since I have so many watches to photograph and list, I prefer not to use photoshop since it takes quite a bit of time to edit each photo. Since using the new strobe lights I get this purple tint which I can’t figure out how to get rid of unless changing the temp, saturation, and tint in photoshop. I want to maintain a white background at the same time but getting the correct lighting for the watch is priority.

In summary

  1. How to get rid of the purple tint using current set up?

  2. How to achieve correct color of watch that is similar to what you would perceive in person? (such as the second photo)

Setup: 2 strobe lights on either side of watch and nikon d3500 on tripod

Here is my current photograph with the purple tint and black shadows around the bezel
Here is the goal I am trying to achieve

Why is there a bright edge in my photos even though my studio lights provide even coverage?

You haven’t told us exactly which Paul Buff Alien Bees flashes you’re using, but many studio flashes take longer to release their energy than most speedlights do. For the most part, camera’s flash sync (X-sync) ratings are based on using the camera with that brand of camera’s in-house speedlight selection sitting directly on the hot shoe or using the camera’s built-in popup flash. This is particularly the case with cameras that do not have a PC port¹ used to send a “fire” signal to external flashes without using the hot shoe connection.

In many cases, this means you must shoot with an exposure time longer (“slower shutter speed”) than your camera’s flash sync setting (X-sync speed). If you use an exposure time shorter than the time it takes the flash to fully fire, the second shutter curtain of your camera will begin closing before the flashes have produced all of its light. The parts of the sensor covered by the second shutter curtain as it is closing will be dimmer than the parts of the frame not covered by the second curtain until after the flash has released most or all of its energy.

Your Canon EOS Rebel T3/1100D has a flash sync setting of 1/200 seconds. That is equal to 5 micro-seconds. The Alien Bees B1600, for example, has a T.1 flash duration at full power of 1/300 second, or 3.3 microseconds. So far so good. The flash can release 90% of it’s burst of light in a shorter time than the camera’s X-sync speed. But then you have to factor in the delay between the time your camera signals the Cactus transmitter to “fire” the flash and the time the Cactus receiver(s) tells the flash(es) to “fire”. If there is any appreciable delay, then at 1/200 seconds your second shutter curtain will begin closing before the flash has released all of its light.

One thing I would check is to be sure you haven’t accidentally dialed in some delay in your Cactus V6 II transmitter’s settings. Anything greater than a delay of 1.67 microseconds (5ms minus 3.33ms) will mean the flash begins firing too late to complete its burst of light before your second shutter curtain is closing. In practice any delay dialed in would need to be shorter than that, because it takes time for the radio trigger to react to the camera’s “fire” signal and send the radio pulse to “fire”, which is an encoded radio signal that has a more than instantaneous length to it, and then it takes the receiver(s) time to decode that signal and send the “fire” command to the flash(es) to which it is connected.

As a proof of concept that the shutter curtain beginning to close before the flash reaches T.1 is the root cause of your issue, take a few test shots with increasingly long exposure times. 1/200, 1/100, 1/60, 1/30, etc. and see if the frame gets increasing brighter on the “far” side from where you are currently getting the bright strip.

¹ PC in the context of flash photography has nothing to do with a personal computer. It is an abbreviation of Prontor/Compur. Prontor has its origins in the Italian word pronto (quick) and was a brand of shutter produced by Alfred Gauthier in the 1950s. Compur, derived from the word compound, was the shutter brand of the Deckel Company. Both companies were based in Germany and both counted Zeiss as an influential stockholder when they introduced the standard 1/8″-inch coaxial connector for shutter/flash synchronization.

Lights not displayed on Sprite

I have a scene that contains 3 elements:

  • Main Camera
  • A 2D Sprite that renders a single white pixel image, scaled to 2000 x 1000
  • A point light with a yellow color

What should be done so that the light is actually rendered on the sprite?

I have recorded a short video showcasing the issue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2iZB6BXhPs

What are these “lights” in the sky in my drone picture?

I have a photo, original and unedited with some unexplained lights in the sky. Here’s an explanation on the scenario. My pics were taken March 10, 2021. I took them all using a drone, Mavic Pro with a filter for light reduction on the lens. I sent the drone up and took pics at multiple times, once around 7:30am and also around 10:30ish am and 1130ish am. This was taken in between storms that hit our area, Mission Viejo, CA. When I eventually uploaded the drone pics to my PC to do my editing is when i noticed the lights. I finished my edits on the first photo and zoomed all the way into the sky to see how much noise was there so that I knew how much noise to remove. I happened to zoom into a part of the photo where one of the lights were. I immediately removed all of my edits and went back and looked and found approx 30 of these lights. I believe there are at least 2 lights that are below the tops of the mountains as well.

I have not had the time to look through all of these photos, but i have looked through a few and the lights are in a few of the photos in the same area from different times, around 730am and 1050isham. I am calling them “lights”, however I’m not saying that’s what they are. And that’s why I’m here, to see if anyone can help, or knows anyone that can help. I have for the most part ruled out lens dust, of course i could be wrong though. Im wondering if there could be some type of meteorological explanation? Most of the lights appear in the blue sky, however some appear in some of the very thin clouds where there is also some visible blue sky behind them. Also as i mentioned, on the far left of the photo it looks as if there are also a couple of the lights below the top of the mountain.
enter image description here
I dont know what this site will let me post, but i should be including the original (unedited except for watermark)enter image description here, as well as a few snapshots taken from the original that are completely zoomed in with magnifier circles placed around some of the lights to zoom in more as well as to show you what you are looking for in the original.

NEED HELP. Lights in sky from drone pic

first time posting here. I’m needing some help. This may or may not require someone experienced with identifying anomaly’s in photos. Not sure how this site works but ill post the pics that i can.

So i have a photo, original and unedited with some unexplained lights in the sky. Here’s an explanation on the scenario. My pics were taken March 10, 2021. I took them all using a drone, Mavic Pro with a filter for light reduction on the lens. I sent the drone up and took pics at multiple times, once around 7:30am and also around 10:30ish am and 1130ish am. This was taken in between storms that hit our area, Mission Viejo, CA. When I eventually uploaded the drone pics to my PC to do my editing is when i noticed the lights. I finished my edits on the first photo and zoomed all the way into the sky to see how much noise was there so that I knew how much noise to remove. I happened to zoom into a part of the photo where one of the lights were. I immediately removed all of my edits and went back and looked and found approx 30 of these lights. I believe there are at least 2 lights that are below the tops of the mountains as well.

I have not had the time to look through all of these photos, but i have looked through a few and the lights are in a few of the photos in the same area from different times, around 730am and 1050isham. I am calling them “lights”, however I’m not saying that’s what they are. And that’s why I’m here, to see if anyone can help, or knows anyone that can help. I have for the most part ruled out lens dust, of course i could be wrong though. Im wondering if there could be some type of meteorological explanation? Most of the lights appear in the blue sky, however some appear in some of the very thin clouds where there is also some visible blue sky behind them. Also as i mentioned, on the far left of the photo it looks as if there are also a couple of the lights below the top of the mountain.
enter image description here
I dont know what this site will let me post, but i should be including the original (unedited except for watermark)enter image description here, as well as a few snapshots taken from the original that are completely zoomed in with magnifier circles placed around some of the lights to zoom in more as well as to show you what you are looking for in the original.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance. FYI its only letting me post 1 pic, I’m using n ipad. It wont let me post the original due to size. If you want more feel free to let me know and if i can reply to comments with more pics i will.

lighting – How can I reduce the effect of sodium vapor street lights in night photography?

Sodium vapor lights lamps come in two types – there is the low pressure which is nearly yellow (589.0 nm and 589.6nm) and the high pressure which produces a more pinkish tone which has a few other elements doping it and resulting in a more ‘natural’ color rendition.

The low pressure one is trivial to filter out with a common filter for photography, and the filter will also do a good job of other light pollution sources.

Didymium and light pollution

The didymium filter (red line), often used by fall color photographers and sometimes known as a ‘red enhancer’ will do a good job of blocking the most common sources of light pollution (the blue line). Note in particular the 589 peak from the light pollution has a very low transmission. It won’t handle all the light pollution, but it will get a number of the wavelengths out.

This glass is also used by glassblowers as a safety glass which helps block UV (not great, but I’d assume they also have a UV coating on them) but also the yellow in the flame that comes from sodium in a borosilicate (pyrex) glass allowing them to see through the flame and look at the glass being worked itself more easily.

There are variations on this filter, such as Hoya’s portrait variation (B&H, Amazon) of the the red intensifier filter:

intensifier vs portrait

Notice while the intensifier has a number of dips and the very significant one between 575nm and 600nm, the portrait one is more even, but still blocks about a third of the light (lets call it a stop or there a bouts) in the 575nm to 600nm range rather than the several stops of blocking power.

The point is that the didymium filter should help in blocking the color of sodium vapor lamps and the other unnatural peaks of light pollution at night. I can’t guarantee that is the case though.

exposure – Metering red lights in film photography

The L508 is capable of metering both reflective light using its spot meter, as well as incident light, which is done using the white dome.

Although reflective metering is more common (think of light meters built in cameras), they suffer from not being colourblind. A reflective light meter assumes to be ‘looking’ at a middle grey scene. If that scene is instead white, for example, the meter thinks that the middle grey is assumes it is seeing is just very brightly lit, and thus tunes down the exposure. This is the exact reason why, with reflective meters, you want to overexpose by a stop or two when shooting snow or other highly reflective surfaces.

The same problem occurs with colour. Yellow, for example, is a highly reflective and will easily fool a spot meter. The same is true for colours that are not very reflective.

With this in mind, you should be able to see that incident metering is the better option here. Incident meters don’t measure the light that is reflected off of the subject, but they rather measure the light that is falling onto the subject, hereby eliminating the effect colour has on your meter reading.

Since I was not there when you took this photo, I cannot tell you why the face is blown out. I can however suggest a way of metering for this scene. To meter for the highlights, one should face the dome of the light meter directly towards the light source. This needs to be done while holding the meter against or next to the person’s face, as you then measure exactly how much light falls onto the face. As you may know, light intensity decreases as it moves farther from the source. Depending on how you want to expose the scene, you may want to take one or more readings. If you shoot with just the aforementioned reading, you will expose only for the highlights and you will therefore underexpose the midtones and especially the shadows. Personally, I usually take a reading of the shadows and the highlights and take a midpoint depending on my scene and how I want to expose for it. In this case, since the person/face is mostly uniformly lit, I would linger to the side of the highlight reading. Remember however that negative film is more accepting of over- than underexposure. When in doubt, shoot for the shadows rather than the highlights.

How can I pair my Godox AD200 with my two Godox TT685s speed lights using a X2Ts godox trigger?

I did my research and found out in order to get my TT685 flashes to work with my trigger I had to not only set the channel and group but also set them on an “ID” located in the menus.

They both worked fine, and I could fire both speed-lights.

Here is my problem. I went now to my Godox AD200 and there is no menu where I can change the “ID” and the only way I could fire all 3 lights (two tt685 speed-lights and AD200) is if i put my AD200 on slave mode. I really would like to trigger all 3 lights through the remote.