Why can’t my Nikon P900 zoom like the demo videos I’ve seen?

Your camera sports an imaging chip that measures 4.55mm height by 6.17mm length. The corner to corner (diagonal) measure of this chip is 7.66mm. This camera has a zoom lens with a variable focal length. The range of the focal length change is 4.3mm thru 357mm.

This camera sports a miniature sensor as compared to a 35mm film camera. The 35mm camera sovereign for about 100 years. Because of it’s popularity, it is customary to describe the view as seen by your camera, stacked up against the view as seen using a 35mm camera. This is an equivalency that may or may not be of benefit to you (gray hairs like this).

This equivalency is called a magnification factor or betters “crop factor”. The crop factor is derived by dividing the two camera’s diagonal measure. For your camera, this value is 5.6. Thus your lens 4.3mm thru 357 delivers the equivalent of a 35mm film camera with a zoom lens focal length range 24 thru 2000mm, this is a formidable zoom range.

We size lens to cameras based on the diagonal of the imaging chip. In this case, your camera has a diagonal measure of 7.66mm. If your camera is set to zoom focal length of 7.66, equivalent to about 43mm, the view delivered will be about the same as the unaided human eye.

If you zoom to a longer focal length, you will be in the telephoto realm. If you set the lens to a shorter than 4.3mm (equivalent to 25mm) or shorter, your camera is operating in wide-angle territory.

Suppose you zoom to 45mm (equivalent to 250mm, you have magnified the “normal view 10X alike looking through 10 power binoculars. If you zoom to the maximum focal length of 357mm equivalent to 2000mm, the view will be approximately the same as viewing through a 2000 ÷ 43 = about 45X power telescope.

Stated differently, a bird 100 yards distance, at maximum zoom, images as if you were positioned 2.2 yards distant. In metric terms, a bird 100 meters distance images as if it were only 2.2 meters distance.

You zoom lens is remarkable in that it is remarkable as to its zoom range.
Be happy, it’s all good!

why is my Nikon P900 not able to zoom like the demo videos I’ve seen?

Your camera sports an imaging chip that measures 4.55mm height by 6.17mm length. The corner to corner (diagonal) measure of this chip is 7.66mm. This camera has a zoom lens with a variable focal length. The range of the focal length change is 4.3mm thru 357mm.

This camera sports a miniature sensor as compared to a 35mm film camera. The 35mm camera sovereign for about 100 years. Because of it’s popularity, it is customary to describe the view as seen by your camera, stacked up against the view as seen using a 35mm camera. This is an equivalency that may or may not be of benefit to you (gray hairs like this).

This equivalency is called a magnification factor or betters “crop factor”. The crop factor is derived by dividing the two camera’s diagonal measure. For your camera, this value is 5.6. Thus your lens 4.3mm thru 357 delivers the equivalent of a 35mm film camera with a zoom lens focal length range 24 thru 2000mm, this is a formidable zoom range.

We size lens to cameras based on the diagonal of the imaging chip. In this case, your camera has a diagonal measure of 7.66mm. If your camera is set to zoom focal length of 7.66, equivalent to about 43mm, the view delivered will be about the same as the unaided human eye.

If you zoom to a longer focal length, you will be in the telephoto realm. If you set the lens to a shorter than 4.3mm (equivalent to 25mm) or shorter, your camera is operating in wide-angle territory.

Suppose you zoom to 45mm (equivalent to 250mm, you have magnified the “normal view 10X alike looking through 10 power binoculars. If you zoom to the maximum focal length of 357mm equivalent to 2000mm, the view will be approximately the same as viewing through a 2000 ÷ 43 = about 45X power telescope.

Stated differently, a bird 100 yards distance, at maximum zoom, images as if you were positioned 2.2 yards distant. In metric terms, a bird 100 meters distance images as if it were only 2.2 meters distance.

You zoom lens is remarkable in that it is remarkable as to its zoom range.
Be happy, it’s all good!

Nikon p900 Bracketing and Timer

I have a Nikon p900. I want to use bracketed exposures along with either a timer or remote shutter. Activating anything off the timer menu, either a 2 second timer or selecting the shutter remote turns off bracketing. Is there really no way to use bracketing with a timer or remote? Thanks

The zoom of Nikon P900

Your camera sports an imaging chip that measures 4.55mm height by 6.17mm length. The corner to corner (diagonal) measure of this chip is 7.66mm. This camera has a zoom lens with a variable focal length. The range of the focal length change is 4.3mm thru 357mm.

This camera sports a miniature sensor as compared to a 35mm film camera. The 35mm camera sovereign for about 100 years. Because of it’s popularity, it is customary to describe the view as seen by your camera, stacked up against the view as seen using a 35mm camera. This is an equivalency that may or may not be of benefit to you (gray hairs like this).

This equivalency is called a magnification factor or betters “crop factor”. The crop factor is derived by dividing the two camera’s diagonal measure. For your camera, this value is 5.6. Thus your lens 4.3mm thru 357 delivers the equivalent of a 35mm film camera with a zoom lens focal length range 24 thru 2000mm, this is a formidable zoom range.

We size lens to cameras based on the diagonal of the imaging chip. In this case, your camera has a diagonal measure of 7.66mm. If your camera is set to zoom focal length of 7.66, equivalent to about 43mm, the view delivered will be about the same as the unaided human eye.

If you zoom to a longer focal length, you will be in the telephoto realm. If you set the lens to a shorter than 4.3mm (equivalent to 25mm) or shorter, your camera is operating in wide-angle territory.

Suppose you zoom to 45mm (equivalent to 250mm, you have magnified the “normal view 10X alike looking through 10 power binoculars. If you zoom to the maximum focal length of 357mm equivalent to 2000mm, the view will be approximately the same as viewing through a 2000 ÷ 43 = about 45X power telescope.

Stated differently, a bird 100 yards distance, at maximum zoom, images as if you were positioned 2.2 yards distant. In metric terms, a bird 100 meters distance images as if it were only 2.2 meters distance.

You zoom lens is remarkable in that it is remarkable as to its zoom range.
Be happy, it’s all good!

nikon – Coolpix P900 in 2020

Is it worth buying Coolpix P900 in 2020 for $ 495?

For what? If for nature and wildlife photography, the answer is most likely no, especially for wildlife. For stationary nature like flowers that are not windy, you can use P900 with tripod (or even handheld in good light).

The reason for this is that P900 has a tiny sensor. Tiny cameras collect little light. For wildlife photography, you can only use fast shutter speeds to avoid motion blur (less than 1/1000 second), and you don't want high ISO noise. Therefore, the only option is a large aperture, which is only possible with a large sensor.

Tiny, high-megapixel cameras typically don't have a lens that matches that megapixel.

If not, what are the best options for wildlife and wildlife photography under $ 500?

  1. Buy a used Canon Crop DSLR case. Used because they are cheaper.
  2. Buy a new or used Canon EF-S 55-250mm IS STM lens. When using, make sure it is the STM version and not the micromotor version as the STM version is better.

I can't promise this will be under $ 500, but it will be well under $ 1000.

As for the Canon Crop DSLR case to buy, I would highly recommend buying one that has a custom lens drive if AF is not available feature option, since the 55-250mm IS-STM lens doesn't Has focus limiter. For example, the EOS 40D has this option, as does the EOS 50D and EOS 60D. If you're lucky, you'll find used EOS 60D + 55-250mm IS STM lenses for under $ 500.

This "lens drive when AF is not possible" prevents the lens from being extremely defocused when nothing can be focused at the focus points.

Nikon P900 Star Trails mode produces only one movie, no tracks

I have a Nikon P900. If you select the Star Trails mode in the Scene menu, the camera can take a photo of the star trails in the night sky, which I suppose will be. However, it only takes a 10-second movie that has been compressed from several 25-second shots over a period of 150 minutes, showing the points of light moving across the sky. There are no trails, what do I want on a single photo? Any ideas out there?

nikon – How can I do continuous shots on my CoolPix p900 every 10 seconds?

According to the Nikon Coolpix D900 user manual, there are only two ways to capture a time-lapse movie with the Coolpix P900: time-lapse movie recording or the interval timer.

Timelapse movie

With the P900, small video clips with a resolution of 10 seconds can be recorded in 1080p by taking up to 300 pictures at different intervals (between 2 seconds and 36 seconds). See operating instructions page 97 for details on operation.
This can be useful to release the time-lapse video format for immediate viewing. The captured images are however carved in stone. It's difficult to retouch them in post-production with photo tools since you need to extract each image as a JPEG. In addition, JPEG is a fairly restrictive format for retouching.

Interval Timer

You can use the interval timer (page 153). This method allows you to capture full quality images at programmed intervals. The user guide does not specify the minimum interval value.

If what you say is correct, intervals can not be set below 30 seconds. I would first look for firmware updates. I think there is little hope that this could be resolved, but we never know.

Unlike DSLR, this camera does not allow the use of an external interval meter that could circumvent the limitations of the camera. In addition, the mobile app that is paired with the P900 (ie Wireless Mobile Utility) prohibits the use of the Interval Timer in Continuous.

All in all, if you need 10s intervals for your time-lapse recording, you need to use the Time Lapse Movie Recording option and edit everything in the camera (white balance, color, contrast …) and consider the limitations of the camera. If you do that very often, maybe it's time to upgrade to DSLR …

Sharpness – Will my bird photos get sharper by upgrading from P900 to Nikon D500 and a 200-400 lens?

While it is true that better equipment will not make you a better photographer, it is equally true that every photographer is limited by the capabilities of the equipment used.

There is an old adage that has been dealing with photography for a long time:

Equipment does not matter.

It's certainly true, but it's only half the story. The rest of the truth is this:

Equipment does not matter – until it's done.

If the technical capabilities of your equipment are not sufficient for the recordings to be taken, then it depends only on the equipment.

When it comes to your equipment, you will know it. This is important because the equipment you use prevents you from doing the work that you want to perform, and you have the skills and knowledge to do it. By the time you reach this point, the gear you are using is fine to you.

Ultimately, equipment with higher abilities can certainly help. But a better camera does not make you a better photographer. It will only allow you to use more of the skills, knowledge and experience you have gained along the way. Part of this experience and knowledge helps to choose the best tool for the job from the options available.

For more information, see: When should I upgrade my camera body? The answer applies equally to lenses or entire systems.

I understand what you say ~ thanks. The picture I posted is good but not good enough. The wings of the butterfly are neither sharp nor the antenna. It also seems to have a little too much contrast that I can not cut out.

You'll probably gain more by improving your technique than by buying another gear that still does not deliver the desired results until you improve your technique. Only if your technique exceeds the limits of the current gear will you get better results with a better gear. If your current results are close to the actual limits of this camera / lens, be sure to choose a better lens and camera (in that order). But I bet there are better results with the P900 in similar conditions.

In the case of the sample photo, the main reason that the butterfly is not sharper is the focus something behind the bird, See how much sharper the thorny vine on which the bird sits is behind the bird than in front of the bird!

Enter image description here

That's a technical problem: you need to know how to tell the camera to focus on what you want instead of what the camera holds for you. Her lens was sharp enough, it just was not focused on what you wanted.

Sharpness – Upgrade from P900 to Nikon D500 and a 200-400 lens

While it is true that better equipment will not make you a better photographer, it is equally true that every photographer is limited by the capabilities of the equipment used.

There is an old adage that has been dealing with photography for a long time:

Equipment does not matter.

It's certainly true, but it's only half the story. The rest of the truth is this:

Equipment does not matter – until it's done.

If the technical capabilities of your equipment are not sufficient for the recordings to be taken, then it depends only on the equipment.

When it comes to your equipment, you will know it. This is important because the equipment you use prevents you from doing the work that you want to perform, and you have the skills and knowledge to do it. By the time you reach this point, the gear you are currently using is perfectly fine to you.

Ultimately, equipment with higher abilities can certainly help. But a better camera does not make you a better photographer. It will only allow you to use more of the skills, knowledge and experience you have gained along the way. Part of this experience and knowledge helps to choose the best tool for the job from the options available.

For more information, see: When should I upgrade my camera body? The answer applies equally to lenses or entire systems.

Astrophotography – How do I change the ISO in Nikon P900 for Time Lapse Star Trails?

When setting up my P900 for time-lapse star trails, the ISO value of 100 will be displayed in the bottom left corner of the monitor. No matter what I tried, I can not change the ISO value, ie 1600 or 3200 for a shoot.
I changed the ISO setting to 3200 in M ​​P A S mode, but when I go to Time Lapse Star trails, the ISO value is still displayed as 100.
Is there a way to change the ISO setting?
Thanks for any help.