Remote Patient Consultation

Unique purpose booths with all the necessary hardware interfaces were developed. A rich user interface was created, and the interface used as a middle tier. Our team collaborated with the client and captured the detailed requirement and designed the two different kiosks. Then continued to engage with the client regularly and incorporating the feedback.

response time – Admin interface – use of “Please be patient”

In a recent update to one of our Admin interfaces (1 user), we added the following warning at the top, to remind the user that once they press the button, it can take several minutes to complete, and to avoid reloading the page and re-submitting, etc. (which has happened recently before the message was added)

enter image description here

The user, however, told us that they don’t get the point of saying “Please be patient”, especially in a Business/Admin interface, and asked if it’s implying that the person operating is “Impatient”. The user also mentioned that this message isn’t “helpful”, and is an incriminating statement.

I believe I’ve seen “Please be patient” written in other Software applications, and I thought this was a standard message to display when a process can take long / unpredictable time.

Was the use of “Please be patient” a bad idea here?
How would you formulate the message above?

database design – Why would patient management systems not assert limits for certain biometric data?

I think many people with even a small experience in designing UI/UX to handle user data will be familiar with the perils of putting in input field/database limits for personal data, such as names. However, when it comes to storing biometric data, such as in medical/patient management software, I might’ve assumed that there was some validation on input given the intended use-case!

That seems as though it might not always be the case, having recently seen this tweet, in which someone was invited for their COVID-19 vaccine prematurely, apparently due to his GP surgery storing his height as 6.2cm, giving a BMI of 28,000.

Questions:

Is this just a flaw in their particular software? Is it possibly just the case that many of these systems were never intended for the mass selection of patient groups?

Or are there valid reasons that you might not want to introduce input ranges and sanity checks to biometric data?


Colour me only mildly concerned, given the AI-based future of medical decision making!

kernel – ata1: link is slow to respond, please be patient err

I am new to this group. I am working with an embedded system with linux kernel version 2.6.32 (MontaVista Linux G++ 4.4-111220) ) on cavium processor. I have a boot CF card, removable CF and an SD card interface. I see after cold reboot the boot CF card is not able to detect by the kernel (not always). The kernel logs shows below warnings and errors during this problematic condition. In the good case I am not seeing the below logs from kernel. Can someone help send some clue or root cause. The Boot CF card seems to be working. Is this issue between kernel and the driver interface ?

2020 Nov 11 13:19:26+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (warning) ata1: device not ready (errno=-16), forcing hardreset
2020 Nov 11 13:19:26+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (warning) (ready=0)
2020 Nov 11 13:19:26+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (err) ata1: SRST failed (errno=-16)
2020 Nov 11 13:19:26+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (warning) ata1: link is slow to respond, please be patient (ready=0)
2020 Nov 11 13:19:26+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (err) ata1: SRST failed (errno=-16)
2020 Nov 11 13:19:26+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (warning) ata1: link is slow to respond, please be patient (ready=0)
2020 Nov 11 13:19:26+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (err) ata1: SRST failed (errno=-16)
2020 Nov 11 13:19:26+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (err) ata1: SRST failed (errno=-16)
2020 Nov 11 13:19:26+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (err) ata1: reset failed, giving up

Here is the logs from a success case.
The ata1.00 logs and ATA CE08TLQVR-FD137- 2013 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 logs ae missing in failed case.

2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (info) ata1.00: CFA: CE08TLQVR-FD137-D, 20130426, max PIO4
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (info) ata1.00: 15662304 sectors, multi 0: LBA48
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (info) ata1.00: configured for PIO4
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (notice) scsi 0:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA CE08TLQVR-FD137- 2013 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (notice) sd 0:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg0 type 0
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (notice) sd 0:0:0:0: (sda) 15662304 512-byte logical blocks: (8.01 GB/7.46 GiB)
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (notice) sd 0:0:0:0: (sda) Write Protect is off
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (notice) sd 0:0:0:0: (sda) Write cache: disabled, read cache: enabled, doesn’t support DPO or FUA
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (info) ehci_hcd 0000:00:02.2: EHCI Host Controller
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (info) ehci_hcd 0000:00:02.2: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 1
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (warning) ehci_hcd 0000:00:02.2: Enabling legacy PCI PM
2021 Jan 22 22:31:36+00:00 wglng-10204 kernel (info) sda: sda1 sda2

dnd 5e – Can a monk with the Dwarven Fortitude feat attack twice and heal (using Patient Defense to Dodge as a bonus action) in the same turn?

You only have one bonus action on your turn

The additional attack from Martial Arts uses a bonus action (emphasis added):

When you use the Attack action with an unarmed strike or a monk weapon on your turn, you can make one unarmed strike as a bonus action.

Similarly, Patient Defense also uses a bonus action (emphasis added):

You can spend 1 ki point to take the Dodge action as a bonus action on your turn.

And you can only take one bonus action per turn:

You can take only one bonus action on your turn, so you must choose which bonus action to use when you have more than one available.

Dwarven Fortitude does work with Patient Defense

The requirement for the relevant part of the Dwarven Fortitude feat reads (XGtE, p. 47):

Whenever you take the Dodge action in combat, you can spend one Hit Die to heal yourself.

And since Patient Defense does have you take the Dodge action (just as a bonus action), this meets the requirement listed in the feat. You should note that you are spending your Hit Dice to do this healing, eating into the healing resources for your short rest (and have taken a half feat for the privilege), and that you’ve spent a ki point (though the benefits of the Dodge action is often worth it). This totals one attack and some borrowed healing on one turn (until you get Extra Attack at 5th level, but that’s built into the class).

dnd 5e – What features, items, or spells allow dodging as a bonus action other than Monk’s Patient Defense?

Almost nothing lets you take the Dodge action as a bonus action

There is, of course, the Monk’s Patient Defense feature:

You can spend 1 ki point to take the Dodge action as a bonus action on your turn.

And besides that there is only the haste spell, which doesn’t actually grant it as a bonus action, but you can Dodge using haste’s own additional action:

Choose a willing creature that you can see within range. Until the spell ends, the target’s speed is doubled, it gains a +2 bonus to AC, it has advantage on Dexterity saving throws, and it gains an additional action on each of its turns. That action can be used only to take the Attack (one weapon attack only), Dash, Disengage, Hide, or Use an Object action. (…)

A theoretical third option would be to use the shapechange spell to turn into a creature that can already Dodge as a bonus action, has an extra action similar to haste, or something else along those lines (assuming such a monster exists).


Note, this is a Community Wiki post, feel free to edit it to add in other methods

android – How patient are users regarding mobile app startup time?

I am making a media player app on Android and one of the big priorities is making the startup of the app quick so that the user can just start the app and click play. I want to know a good benchmark to aim for so that the user feels that it is fast, but is still within the realm of doable (given the number of calculations and networking requests I want to do on startup). I saw somewhere in the Android documentation that if it takes your app longer than 1/10th of a second to respond, it feels slow, and am wondering how that applies to startup (if people are a little more tolerant of waiting). The app pulls a significant amount of data from a website and (among other network requests) I am trying to figure out when fetching new data from the website to check for changes against the app’s local cache will reach the point of diminishing returns.

website – What the EMR Advantage patient portal lets patients see, and what it doesn’t let them see

I used to live in Ottawa. At the time, I visited an Appletree Medical Group doctor. The doctor then stored some information in my electronic medical record (“chart”).

This week, my dental-hygiene clinic asked me for some information from my chart.

Today, I logged into the Appletree patient portal, which is really just an instance of the Canadian Health Systems EMR Advantage patient portal. But I couldn’t find the information I was looking for.

Why not?

Data flow diagram for patient information system for a hospital

I have an example of a DFD for a patient information system implemented in a particular hospital. The following illustration shows the level 0 diagram (if we consider that the first level is the context diagram, then the second level is the level 0 diagram and so on).

Enter the image description here

In this system, patients can search and make appointments. My problem is related to the flow of data that is labeled with the patient name that the process directs to make appointments for the database patients. I don't understand why we have such data in our system. In other words, in which scenario does the process appointment send the patient name to the patient database? The process already sends the patient name. Maintain patient information!

Electronic patient records with blockchain – Cryptocurrencies Corner

Blockchain applications and solutions are already the desired addition for several clinical and pharmaceutical operations. Health organizations use them to establish end-to-end drug supply chain tracking, validate clinical trial results, and prevent health insurance fraud. Similarly, blockchain implementation in EHRs can revise various traditional data management standards and provide three new methods for technically controlled care delivery.

Blockchain is currently an outstanding technology with which EHR systems can be strengthened and turned into a fully-fledged center for technical care. Recent blockchain developments for the healthcare industry suggest that adoption rates are likely to increase. Startups have already started to invest in blockchain for EHR mobile apps to improve healthcare and provide data control capabilities to patients. If you'd like to learn the benefits of blockchain in EHR management, contact our blockchain team for instructive guidance.