Why the photos edited on lightroom desktop looks different in mobile phone?

I am using Adobe Lightroom CC to edit photos on my computer. When I edit them on computer and export them it looks good on my computer.

But, when I copy same images on mobile device then they looks different. they look over saturated in mobile. (Colors are more saturated in mobile device).

Export settings in lightroom:

enter image description here

I will do Colorize Image, Editing and Repairing your old photos for $5

I will do Colorize Image, Editing and Repairing your old photos

I will colorize your black and white photo and Edit or remove background images

To see an old black and white photo carefully colorized can be an emotional experience. Adding color brings the people and the surrounding items back to life with an immediacy and an impact that can be truly stunning.

Sometimes we tint and colorize photos to restore them to their pre-faded glory. Time, ozone, poor color chemistry, and the sun can each rob a photo of its vibrancy.

so what are you waiting for!

.

I will do Colorize Image, Editing and Repairing your old photos for $5

I will do Colorize Image, Editing and Repairing your old photos

I will colorize your black and white photo and Edit or remove background images

To see an old black and white photo carefully colorized can be an emotional experience. Adding color brings the people and the surrounding items back to life with an immediacy and an impact that can be truly stunning.

Sometimes we tint and colorize photos to restore them to their pre-faded glory. Time, ozone, poor color chemistry, and the sun can each rob a photo of its vibrancy.

so what are you waiting for!

.

Windows Photos App “Save” instead of “Save a copy” as the default

Every time I wish to save a photo instead of creating a new file for the edits I just made, I have to click on the arrow which gives the “Save” option instead of the “Save a copy” option.

enter image description here

How do I make the “Save” option as a default so that I can avoid clicking the arrow every single time and perhaps save myself some time as it helps if you edit many photos at once.

Moving photos from phone

I am trying to transfer photos from an android phone to my PC using a USB cord. The PC imports all the photos except the very recent ones taken about 1 month ago. I am wondering if I need to clear anything to accomplish what is usually a simple feat.

How can we set user profile photos in Lubuntu 20.04?

The initial log-in screen shows at least one user which can be logged into the system, with a blank photo. How can we add or change this user-image? The manual shows nothing relevant when searched for ‘image’, ‘photo’, etc.

Possibly related: [Ubuntu 20.04] Change your login screen photo and Where is ‘Users and User groups’ in Lubuntu 20.04? and How do I change login screen theme or background in Ubuntu 20.04?

photos – Map with all accessible geo-tagged images?

I would like to browse all available geo-tagged images on a map. There are Google Maps, Google Earth, Flickr Map, etc. but all of them are displaying only images uploaded to the particular service.

Is there a service crawling the internet for geo-tagged images and displaying them on a map?

There shouldn’t be a legal obstacle creating this, e.g. Google Images are displaying images from various sources.

prints – How can I glue photos back to back to a card, then laminate?

Most recommendations concerning what glues and cements are best for photographs, stem from the days of chemical-based prints. We are talking silver/gelatin black & white and dye/gelatin color prints on conventional chemical-based photo paper. These recommendations steered you away from cements with low pH and chemical content that could damage. All sound advice. Chemical-based silver/gelatin prints are attacked by sulfur, and chemical-based color prints are comprised of organic dyes that persist only if the pH is within a narrow range.

Further, both the color and the black & white images were bonded to the paper using glue made from gelatin. This is the same gelatin used to make tempting desserts. Pastes and glues that absorb moisture are no-nos; the moisture migrates to the gelatin. Add water to gelatin on paper (or film) you get a tasty meal for mold and other beasties. I think modern prints produced by inkjet and the like are more robust. Not to the point that we should throw caution the wind, but not to the point we should become paranoid as to what glue or pastes we should use.