dnd 5e – Do the effects of the “beard” attack from a bearded devil interfere with recovering from the infernal wound from its “glaive” attack?

When a feature prevents its target from the regain of hit points, it does not prevent receiving healing.

No rule explicitly talks about a healing minimum, so we should assume that healing that features reduce to 0 still counts as receiving healing, similar to how receiving damage that features reduce to 0 counts as taking damage.

See Healing:

When a creature receives healing of any kind, hit points regained are
added to its current hit points.

Here we can explicitly see the logical distinction of receiving healing as a cause of regaining hit points. The order is explicitly not such that you need to regain hit points to receive healing.

Bearded Devil:

the target can’t regain hit points

Here we see that the beard attack doesn’t prevent healing. It only prevents the regain of hit points.

The glaive attack also has a specific inbuilt mechanic that doesn’t restore hit points and staunches the wound:

Any creature can take an action to stanch the wound with a successful
DC 12 Wisdom (Medicine) check.

PostgreSQL startup recovering – Stack Overflow

I have three node cluster. node1(primary), node2(hot standby), node3(hot standby). node1 is down. I promoted the node2 as new primary. After that run the pg_rewind on node3 to point to the new primary(node2), pg_rewind worked without any error. After this, on node3, getting below:

Main PID: 11039 (postmaster)

CGroup: /system.slice/postgresql-12.service

       ├─11039 /usr/pgsql-12/bin/postmaster -D /var/lib/pgsql/12/data/
       └─11041 postgres: startup   recovering 000000020000000A000000F3

on node3, getting below debug logs:

Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(11041): (705-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  switched WAL source from stream to archive after failure
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(11041): (705-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  switched WAL source from stream to archive after failure
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(11041): (706-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  invalid resource manager ID
110 at A/F39FD7C0
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(11041): (706-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  invalid resource manager ID
110 at A/F39FD7C0
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(11041): (707-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  switched WAL source from archive to stream after failure
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(11041): (707-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  switched WAL source from archive to stream after failure
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(11041): (708-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC LOG:  invalid resource manager ID 110 at A/F39FD7C0
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(11041): (708-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC LOG:  invalid resource manager ID 110 at A/F39FD7C0
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (202-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  shmem_exit(1): 1 before_shmem_exit callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (203-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  shmem_exit(1): 5 on_shmem_exit callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (204-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  proc_exit(1): 2 callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (205-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  exit(1)
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (206-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  shmem_exit(-1): 0 before_shmem_exit callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (207-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  shmem_exit(-1): 0 on_shmem_exit callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (202-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  shmem_exit(1): 1 before_shmem_exit callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (203-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  shmem_exit(1): 5 on_shmem_exit callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (204-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  proc_exit(1): 2 callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (205-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  exit(1)
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (206-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  shmem_exit(-1): 0 before_shmem_exit callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (207-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  shmem_exit(-1): 0 on_shmem_exit callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (208-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  proc_exit(-1): 0 callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(12095): (208-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  proc_exit(-1): 0 callbacks to make
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(11039): (202-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  reaping dead processes
Aug 24 07:54:02 fsrstandby postgres(11039): (202-1) 2021-08-24 07:54:02 UTC DEBUG:  reaping dead processes

nt.number theory – Recovering basic information about perfect numbers from a Dirichlet series

The following question is inspired mostly by this question, answer and the comment by Wojowu there

A naive approach to understanding odd perfect numbers is to make a Dirichlet series where the $n$th odd terms is zero if and only if $n$ is an odd perfect number, namely $$A(s)= zeta(s)zeta(s-1) -2 zeta(s-1).$$

One might hope that one could then use analysis to get some sort of non-trivial statement about when a term can be zero.

One could then look at something like
$$lim_{T rightarrow infty} frac{1}{2T} int_{-T}^{T} A(s+it)x^{s+it} dt . (1) $$

As long as s is sufficiently large (and in fact , we may take $s>2$), when $x>0$, the limit in (1) is equal to $sigma(n)-2n$ exactly when $x=n$ and and 0 otherwise. However, there’s no content in this statement involving the series $A(s)$ other than that that the Dirichlet series converges if $s>2$. But one might hope that this framework or something like it could get non-trivial statements about when the above integral can be zero with odd $n$.

The most naive thing to start off with here would be to see if one can recover very basic properties of perfect numbers in this analytic context. Here are three statements which are very easy to prove and none of which even require unique prime factorization:

  1. No perfect number is a power of a prime.
  2. No perfect number is congruent to 3 (mod 4).
  3. No perfect number is congruent to 2 (mod 3).

So the question is, can we use this analytic approach to recover any of these statements or any similar statements? This would seem to be a reasonable test that this sort of framework has even a small chance of being productive.

depth of field – Recovering physical distance from perceived distance in telephoto lens

I am trying to find a way to estimate the DOF from the perceived distance through a telephoto lens. The problem is, most DOF calculators use the physical distance from the subject to the lens to calculate the DOF. But for the telephoto range, it is much easier and practical to estimate the perceived distance of the object as it appears in the EVF rather than the actual physical distance due to how far the subject is from the camera. So suppose the focal length is f and the subject seems to be x meters away from me through the lens, is there a way to recover the physical distance s of the subject?

Also, due to perspective distortion, the scene will look compressed through a telephoto lens. Suppose, looking through the lens, I estimate the distance between two objects to be y meters (along the depth axis), and I want both objects to look sharp. Should the physical depth of field be y, or should I adjust that as well?

New member seeking help with recovering a Simple Machines forum


If you do not know what are you doing hire a professional !!!!

but from what I’m seeing Table ‘./wtfu_sw452/smf_sessions’ is marked as crashed and should be repaired

You just got to login to your control panel or phpmyadmin choose wtfu_sw452 databases table smf_sessions and repair it

P.S it is not good that you host do not respond for something so simple and their ssl is expired and they do not offer new products to be purchases which is red flags …

sql server – Recovering SQL database when OS crashed

I was working on a DB design its almost finished. But missed to take a backup.
While working due to some reason my OS got crashed (Win 10) and nothing helped to recover it.

But I am able to access the hdd contents when connecting in another PC.

So is there is anyway to recover the DB using an SQL server express installation on that PC.

On googling I have found there is some attach option using MDF files

But I am not able to find the MDF files in the Program FilesMS SQL server folder

Where SQL server express 2019 is storing MDF files by default?

riemann surfaces – Recovering a family of rational functions from branch points

Let $Y$ be a compact Riemann surface and $B$ a finite subset of $Y$. It is a standard fact that isomorphism classes of holomorphic ramified covers $f:Xrightarrow Y$ of degree $d$ with branch points in $B$ are in a correspondence with homomorphisms $rho:pi_1(Y-B)rightarrow S_d$ with transitive image modulo conjugation by elements of the permutation group $S_d$. Writing a formula for $f$ from the knowledge of $Bsubset Y$ and $rho$ is often hard, e.g. the task of recovering a Belyi map from its dessin where $|B|=3$. I am interested in the case of $X=Y=Bbb{CP}^1$, and some points from $B$ moving in the Riemann sphere. Here is an example:

  • Consider rational functions $f:Bbb{CP}^1rightarrowBbb{CP}^1$ of degree $3$ with four simple critical points that have $1,omega,bar{omega}$ among their critical values $left(omega={rm{e}}^{frac{2pi{rm{i}}}{3}}right)$, thus $B={1,omega,bar{omega},beta}$ with $beta$ varying in a punctured sphere. To fix an element in the isomorphism class, we can pre-compose $f$ with a suitable Möbius transformation so that $1$, $bar{omega}$ and $omega$ are the critical points lying above $1$, $omega$ and $bar{omega}$ respectively: $f(1)=1, f(bar{omega})=omega, f(omega)=bar{omega}$. A normal form for such functions is
    $$
    left{f_alpha(z):=frac{alpha z^3+3z^2+2alpha}{2z^3+3alpha z+1}right}_alpha.
    $$

    A simple computation shows that the fourth critical point is $alpha^2$, and hence $beta=beta_alpha=:f_alpha(alpha^2)=frac{alpha^4+2alpha}{2alpha^3+1}$. Here is my question:

Why $beta$ is not a degree one function of $alpha?$ Shouldn’t the knowledge of the branch locus and the monodromy determine $f_alpha(z)$ in the normalized form above? I presume the monodromy does not change because there are only finitely many possibilities for it and this is a continuous family.

To monodromy of $f_alpha$ is a homomorphism
$$
rho_alpha:pi_1left(Bbb{CP}^1-{1,omega,bar{omega},beta_alpha}right)rightarrow S_3
$$

where small loops around $1,omega,bar{omega},beta_alpha$ generate the fundamental group, and are mapped to transpositions in $S_3$ whose product is identity and are not all distinct. So I guess my question is how can such a discrete object vary with $alpha$; and if it doesn’t, why the assignment $alphamapstobeta(alpha)$ is not injective. The degree of this assignment is four, and there are also four conjugacy classes of homomorphisms
$rho:langlesigma_1,sigma_2,sigma_3,sigma_4midsigma_1sigma_2sigma_3sigma_4=mathbf{1}ranglerightarrow S_3$ with ${rm{Im}}(rho)$ being a transitive subgroup of $S_3$ generated by transpositions $rho(sigma_i)$:
$$
sigma_1mapsto (1,2),sigma_2mapsto (1,2),sigma_3mapsto (1,3), sigma_4mapsto (1,3);\
sigma_1mapsto (1,2),sigma_2mapsto (1,3),sigma_3mapsto (1,2), sigma_4mapsto (2,3);\
sigma_1mapsto (1,2),sigma_2mapsto (1,3),sigma_3mapsto (1,3), sigma_4mapsto (1,2);\
sigma_1mapsto (1,2),sigma_2mapsto (1,3),sigma_3mapsto (2,3), sigma_4mapsto (1,3).
$$

Is it accidental that the degree of $alphamapstobeta(alpha)$ is the same as the number of possibilities for the monodromy representations compatible with our ramification structure?

linux – Need help recovering data using TestDisk

This is what my partitions looks like now:
partition table

Earlier the Unallocated 20GB space was just after OS(C:) partition. I booted to a Linux Mint Live Disk and used Gparted to move the unallocated space after the 150GB Pop OS and expand it. It crashed midway and after I tried rebooting to Pop OS, I am unable to boot into it. I get initramfs. So I booted into Windows 10(works fine) and used TestDisk to recover lost data.

I selected my Drive, selected EFI GPT partition type, and selected Analyse and I got this:
current partition structure
I couldn’t understand anything, So I proceeded to Quick Search and after 5-10 minutes I got this:

The harddisk (512 GB / 476 GiB) seems too small! (< 1023 GB / 953 GiB)
Check the harddisk size: HD jumper settings, BIOS detection...                                                                                                                                                                                  
The following partition can't be recovered:                                                                                  
Partition               Start        End    Size in sectors                                                        
>  MS Data               1000215182 1999863068  999647887 

I proceeded and got this:

Disk /dev/sda - 512 GB / 476 GiB - CHS 62260 255 63                                                                          
Partition               Start        End    Size in sectors                                                        
>P EFI System                  2048     534527     532480 (EFI System Partition) (SYSTEM)                                
D MS Data                   567296  623962929  623395634 (OS)                                                           
D MS Data                   567296 1000215182  999647887 (OS)                                                           
D EFI System             623964160  625192959    1228800 (EFI System Partition) (NO NAME)                               
D Linux Swap             625192960  641970159   16777200                                                                
D EFI System             665907200  667135999    1228800 (EFI System Partition) (NO NAME)                               
D Linux Swap             667136000  683913199   16777200                                                                
D Linux filesys. data    683913216  998469631  314556416                                                                
D MS Data                996732929  998473728    1740800                                                                
D MS Data                998473728 1000214527    1740800 (RECOVERY)

Now, What should I do?