availability groups – The Windows Server Failover Clustering (WSFC) resource control API returned error code 19

Here are the details of that error code (19):

ERROR_WRITE_PROTECT

19 (0x13)

The media is write protected.

You need to consult the cluster log (use Get-ClusterLog to get that) for additional details about what writes failed within the cluster operation being performed. Check that out and update your question with any errors you see.

That being said, combined with this symptom:

…if you reboot second node, database wont up.

You might be experiencing disk problems. Check the Windows system event log and SQL Server error log for messages related to failed writes or corruption.

oauth2 – OIDC Should I authenticate as the resource owner or machine when accessing an centralised authorization service?

We have an existing user authentication service based on casbin (https://github.com/casbin/casbin) which implements RBAC and holds fine grained user permissions. We are looking to expose this user authentication service as a webservice for other microservices in our organization to consume.

At the same time, we are also looking to upgrade our systems to use OIDC. The users will send HTTP requests with access tokens to the the microservice APIs which will validate the tokens with an authorization server.

Provided the user is authorized to access the API we will need to check the fine grained permissions. Should we authorize to the fine-grained user permission webservice using the access token provided by the user to the microservice, or should our microservices have their own set of client credentials to check the fine grained authorization service?

ruby – Rails: What route to let show one resource but submit to another?

I’m sketching out a data model for a Rails app that lets users submit answers to technical questions. For example, the prompt might be:

Write a SQL query to determine the number of unique visitors last week

My models would look like this:

class User < ApplicationRecord
  has_many :submissions
end

class Submission < ApplicationRecord
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :question
end

class Question < ApplicationRecord
  has_many :submissions
end

I’d like a user to be able to visit a page that will display:

  1. The question’s prompt
  2. The user’s previous submissions for this question
  3. A form that lets the user create a new submission for this question

How should I set up my routes given these requirements? I’m pretty lost but am thinking I could use nested resources in my routes.rb:

# not sure order matters here; I've usually seen nested routes be 
# ordered by the has many relationship.  so if A has many B and B has 
# many C, then the nesting order is A, B, C.

resources :questions do  
  resources :users do
    resources :submissions
  end
end

If I did that, a specific user submitting an answer to a specific question could be:

POST to /questions/:question_id/users/:user_id/submissions

Then my controller’s create action could look like this:

class SubmissionController < ApplicationController
  def create
    @question = Question.find(params(:question_id))
    @user = User.find(params(:user_id))
    Submission.create(params(:submission), user: current_user, question: @question)
    @submissions = Submission.where(user: @user, question: @question)
   
    redirect_to (@question, @user)
  end
end 

Is there a more RESTful / Rails-ey way to go about the above? If there’s not, does the ordering of my nested routes matter? Thanks in advance for any help you can offer!

Resource Filter by AddonsLab | NulledTeam UnderGround

If the filter URL is modified and the values of multiple-selection fields are changed intentionally (e.g. with an attempt to cause an error in the website or execute SQL injection), there would be a PHP error logged in the admin panel. However, this would not cause any visible errors or unexpected SQL queries. With this release, we have made sure these invalid values don’t make their way to built-in XenForo functions that expect only valid values.

This version also fixes a compatibility…

.(tagsToTranslate)xenforo nulled(t)nulled(t)whmcs nulled(t)vbulletin nulled(t)whmcs themes nulled(t)whmcs modules nulled(t)whmcs template nulled(t)nulled forum(t)best nulled scripts site(t)whmcs templates nulled(t)phpfox nulled(t)nulled script(t)xenforo 2 nulled(t)best nulled sites(t)xenforo nulled themes(t)whmcs nulled(t)nulled scripts(t)vbulletin 5 nulled(t)whmcs addons nulled(t)arrowchat nulled(t)cs-cart nulled(t)xfilesharing pro nulled(t)nulled script forum(t)cs cart nulled(t)nulled sites(t)blesta nulled

Optimizing the economy of a resource management game

Using the revised explanation of the mechanics from a comment:

You’re thinking the player gets 80% of 105% the base value. That wasn’t my intention. The player actually gets 80% of the 5% profit above the base value (and of course they get the base value too)

We can analyze this a different way (check the edit history if you want to see the previous analysis under a different interpretation of the rules).

We’ll look at the player’s expected hourly earning from fielding a machine with value $v$ that accrues $a$ treasure per hour and might get purchased with probability $p$ in that hour:

$$begin{align}
E_text{player} &= p (0.8 times 0.05 v + v) + (1-p)a\
&= 1.04 p v + a – p a\
end{align}$$

By construction, this is always positive. So that seems to suggest that this is always a profitable investment for all parties and we can make free money off it endlessly! But we know to be suspicious of perpetual motion machines, so let’s look closer.

The exponential growth of the machine prices is the trick. Even with a small growth factor like 5%, these values get huge. A machine purchased for $1 originally costs $10 after 48 trades, $100 after 95 trades, $10 00 after 142 trades, and $10 000 after 189 trades.

As we get into these higher prices, whatever rate of return per hour $a$ the original $1 machine gave me in treasure earnings is pretty much negligible compared to what I had to pay to buy it. I could get a better return by putting that same money into a savings account or GIC instead. So now as a machine-holder I’m relying solely on other players buying the machine off me to make a profit.

But as we go up and up in price, the pool of potential customers willing to shell out that kind of money for this “game” gets thinner and thinner.

If we model the probability of a machine getting purchased in a given hour as inversely proportional to its price, then my expected earnings per hour approach a constant, while the price to stay in the game (by buying a new machine anytime one of mine gets bought) continues growing exponentially.

$$begin{align}
E_text{player} &= p (0.8 times 0.05 v + v) + (1-p)a\
&= 1.04 p v + a – p a\
&= 1.04 frac {p^*} v v + a – frac {p^*} v a\
&= 1.04 p^* + a – frac {p^* a} v
end{align}$$

So there will always come a point where this bounded earning rate drops below what the player can be earning through alternative investments. So they stop buying new machines, cash out their treasure, and put that money into an investment that scales with their investment instead.

That leaves you with a pool of machines that are no longer trading hands (so you make no new profit), and an obligation to continue paying their hourly treasure earnings indefinitely.

So neither the endless exponential growth nor perpetual payment obligation are sustainable.

Check out VPS Resource Pools with DesiVPS! (Los Angeles/Netherlands)

VPS resource pools are a cool idea that a few hosts have offered.  You buy a set of resources (so many virtual cores, so many GBs of RAM, etc.) and then you get to decide how you want to carve them up.  Maybe you want a few big VPSes or many small VPSes or any combination you wish.  And of course, you can reconfigure any time, so you have the freedom to periodically move resources around.

Of course, you could just buy more VPSes, but the point with resource pools is that you can design plans that maybe aren’t the standard cookie-cutter “T-shirt sizes” that hosts offer.  It’s another level of flexibility.

If this sounds interesting, check out the offers below from DesiVPS.  We last featured them back on December 26, 2020 when they brought us some “standard” VPS plans.  Now they’re offering VPS resource pools as well!

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raindog308

I’m Andrew, techno polymath and long-time LowEndTalk community Moderator. My technical interests include all things Unix, perl, python, shell scripting, and relational database systems. I enjoy writing technical articles here on LowEndBox to help people get more out of their VPSes.

Is there a modern “x86″(64) assembly language resource (book/pdf/datasheet) with all AMD EPYC 7702 (or similar) instructions documented?

Back when I learned 6502, 6809, 8088, 80×86, and a few others – there was always a book that had the entire instruction set clearly documented.

Is there a modern equivalent for multi-core chips like the AMD EPYC 7702 ?

I’m wanting experiment with sophisticated multi-processing – mathematics specifically – so I’m hoping for something that lays out all the latest math-related op codes and anything about inter-core communications.

algorithms – The max-min resource assignment problem

I am wondering if there are any results for the following max-min assignment problem:

Given n machines C = {C$_1$, C$_2$C$_n$} with the k-th machine has power C$_k$. There are m tasks T = {T$_1$, T$_2$T$_m$}. Each machine can cover a subset of the tasks in T. Now we assign each task to a machine that can cover it. The set of tasks assigned to the k-th machine is CT(k). If the j-th task is assigned to the k-th machine, its received power is C$_k$/|CT(k)|. The question is: how to assign each task to a machine that can cover it, such that the minimum received power of all tasks are maximized?