dnd 5e – How do the Warding Bond and Tether Essence spells interact?

The warding bond spell states:

(…) Also, each time it takes damage, you take the same amount of damage. (…)

The tether essence spell states:

(…) When damage is dealt to one of them, the same damage is dealt to the other one. (…)

Let’s assume that Alex and Bailey are bonded together and Alex cast the spell. This is a one-way feature so if Alex took damage, nothing special happens and if Bailey takes damage it is first halved (due to the resistance) and then Alex takes the same amount of damage.

Let’s assume that Alex and Bailey are tethered together. It’s clear that tether essence cannot activate off of its own damage; in other words, if Alex took damage, Bailey would then take the same amount of damage and it would end there. Alex would not take the damage Bailey just took.

These cases are rather clear and straightforward, but happens if they are bonded and tethered together? Say Alex cast warding bond again; what happens if Alex takes damage? Bailey takes the same amount of damage and then…? Does tether essence activate? Does that make warding bond activate again?

What if Bailey took the initial damage: Does warding bond activate or tether essence or both? If warding bond activates does tether essence then activate from the damage that Alex takes?

What happens when both of these spells are active on the same two creatures and one of them (either the caster of warding bond or the other one) takes damage?

dnd 5e – Why do level 4 and 5 Druid spells seem to change tone?

I am playing a Druid for the first time (D&D 5e) and am quite enjoying it. My character recently hit level 9, and I noticed that the 4th and 5th level spells seem to shift in tone dramatically from earlier levels.

While lower level spells seem to emphasize beasts and nature thematically, the higher level spells seem to shift toward elementals and life force / necromancy style spells. Is there a reason for this?

In other words, is there lore behind the shift in tone and theme?

Or is there a tactical reason for this shift?

Or am I imagining things?

dnd 5e – Are the spells learned from the “Touched” feats considered class spells when cast using spell slots?

The Fey Touched and Shadow Touched feats published in Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything each grant the use of two spells. Among other things, they say:

  1. You learn the (spells).
  2. You can cast each of these spells without expending a spell slot (once per long rest).
  3. You can also cast these spells using spell slots you have of the appropriate level.

The spellcasting ability for these spells is specific to the feat, so it may or may not be the same as the ability of a class that grants spell slots.


Casting classes all have their own quirks regulating their spellcasting features, but these shouldn’t be relevant to how the Touched feats’ spells are cast in #2 because that casting isn’t using a spellcasting feature. This is clear because even non-casting classes can cast the spells in this way, so only the generic spellcasting rules apply there.

(This is related to why racial feat spells can’t be cast with a focus, as discussed at If a spellcaster’s racial trait grants a spell that requires material components, can they use their class’ focus to cast that spell?)

However, things get more complicated when the feats’ spells are cast as described in #3, because the spell slots referenced there do come from a class spellcasting feature. In that case, does the caster simply use the spell slot as “fuel” and otherwise cast the spell exactly as it had been cast for #2? Or is this inherently different, with the caster actually using their class spellcasting feature and therefore having to follow all of its specific rules?

Furthermore, is the answer different depending on whether the specific Touched feat spell being cast is on the caster’s class’ spell list or not?


Potentially Related:

Does Magic Initiate allow the chosen spell to effectively be “always prepared” if the spell is on their spell list?

What makes a spell being cast considered to be a {class} spell?

Are spells learned from feats considered to be associated with your class?

dnd 5e – Are the “Touched” feats’ spells ever subject to a spellcaster’s class rules (such as regarding preparation, components, and focuses)?

The Fey Touched and Shadow Touched feats published in Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything each grant the use of two spells. Among other things, they say:

  1. You learn the [spells].
  2. You can cast each of these spells without expending a spell slot [once per long rest].
  3. You can also cast these spells using spell slots you have of the appropriate level.

The spellcasting ability for these spells is specific to the feat, so it may or may not be the same as the ability of the class that granted the spell slots.


My question applies to both feats and all spellcasting classes, but for the sake of clarity consider an artificer who has taken Fey Touched, which grants Misty Step. Artificers must add the M component to all spells they cast using the artificers’ spellcasting feature, but #2 above has nothing to do with their feature so shouldn’t require that. That’s good, because the reason the artificer can teleport is their prior exposure to the Fey, not some magical widget.

However, things get more complicated when they’re casting Misty Step as described in #3, because the artificer’s spell slots do come from their spellcasting feature. In that case, does the artificer simply use the spell slot as “fuel” and otherwise cast the spell exactly as it had been cast for #2? Or is this inherently different, for which we must assume the artificer studied the Misty Step effect and replicated it with a widget?

If the former, we can assume the spell never needs to be prepared; if the latter, it almost certainly does need to be prepared like all artificer spells.

Also, Misty Step is not on the Artificer Spell List, but the Invisibility spell granted by Shadow Touched is. Would that alter the answer in any way?


Potentially Related:

Does Magic Initiate allow the chosen spell to effectively be “always prepared” if the spell is on their spell list?

What makes a spell being cast considered to be a {class} spell?

If a spellcaster’s racial trait grants a spell that requires material components, can they use their class’ focus to cast that spell?

dnd 5e – Does Dispel Magic Affect Living Spells in any Meaningful Way?

I recently came to a point where I was trying to find a source that talks about Dispel Magic in relation to Living Spells. Living Spells are very similar in a lot of ways to spells with a few notable exceptions obviously, but they are still at their core magical spells from what I can ascertain. Dispel Magic can currently dispel spells with a d20 check sometimes if they spell is of a certain level or higher, but it doesn’t address whether a Living Spell would be affected by Dispel Magic.

How would Dispel Magic work when cast on a Living Spell?

dnd 5e – Can a kraken cast wizard spells which require verbal and somatic components?

The Kraken, according to the monster manual, can “Understand Abyssal, Celestial, Infernal, And Primordial But Can’t Speak, Telepathy 120 Ft.” The Kraken also does not have hands. It seems as if the Kraken can barely cast any spells at all. Can these factors be somehow overcome or explained away, ideally whilst staying within the basic 5e rules?

dnd 5e – Can reaction spells be cast without any trigger?

I’ve come across a few questions regarding the spell storing ring to which my question matters. Under spell storing ring it reads:

Any creature can Cast a Spell of 1st through 5th Level into the ring by touching the ring as the spell is cast. The spell has no Effect, other than to be stored in the ring.

So to store a spell in the ring you cast the spell. Shield or absorb elements have a casting time of a reaction, can they be cast without a trigger? In particular, in our game the need came up to store reaction spells mid-combat. But the casting time of these spells is a reaction, so the question came up can you use your reaction without a trigger?

Under rules for spellcasting there are 3 blocks that give some guidance on casting time:

Each spell description begins with a block of information, including the spell’s name, level, school of magic, casting time, range, components, and duration. The rest of a spell entry describes the spell’s effect.

Most spells require a single action to cast, but some spells require a bonus action, a reaction, or much more time to cast.

Some spells can be cast as reactions. These spells take a fraction of a second to bring about and are cast in response to some event. If a spell can be cast as a reaction, the spell description tells you exactly when you can do so.

Rules for combat has this:

Certain Special Abilities, Spells, and situations allow you to take a Special action called a Reaction. A Reaction is an instant response to a trigger of some kind, which can occur on Your Turn or on someone else’s.

Combining these, we know that the spell block contains the casting time, these spells have a casting time of “1 reaction”. We know these spells take a fraction of a second to bring about so they are fast, it seems requiring an action or bonus action for it to be cast is unwarranted. However, it also says if a spell can be cast as a reaction, the spell description tells you exactly when you can do so. Furthermore “a reaction is an instant response to a trigger of some kind.”

Does this mean you can’t cast a reaction spell without the trigger? Does this imply that you have to get hit to store the shield spell into the ring?

Can a mage cast shield or absorb elements without getting hit or receiving elemental damage? If so, when can they take their reaction to store the spell in the ring, I’d presume it would have to be their own turn (using their reaction just to store the spell), but can they react to nothing off turn to store the spell?

dnd 5e – Can the Detect Magic spell detect prepared spells or spellcasters?

The Sage Advice Compendium addresses a related question:

Is the breath weapon of a dragon magical?

If you cast antimagic field, don armor of invulnerability, or use another feature of the game that protects against magical or non-magical effects, you might ask yourself, “Will this protect me against a dragon’s breath?” The breath weapon of a typical dragon isn’t considered magical, so antimagic field won’t help you but armor of invulnerability will.

You might be thinking, “Dragons seem pretty magical to me.” And yes, they are extraordinary! Their description even says they’re magical. But our game makes a distinction between two types of magic:

  • the background magic that is part of the D&D multiverse’s physics and
    the physiology of many D&D creatures
  • the concentrated magical energy that is contained in a magic item or
    channeled to create a spell or other focused magical effect

In D&D, the first type of magic is part of nature. It is no more dispellable than the wind. A monster like a dragon exists because of that magic-enhanced nature. The second type of magic is what the rules are concerned about. When a rule refers to something being magical, it’s referring to that second type. Determining whether a game feature is magical is straightforward. Ask yourself these questions about the feature:

  • Is it a magic item?
  • Is it a spell? Or does it let you create the effects of a spell that’s
    mentioned in its description?
  • Is it a spell attack?
  • Is it fueled by the use of spell slots?
  • Does its description say it’s magical?

If your answer to any of those questions is yes, the feature is magical.

Let’s look at a white dragon’s Cold Breath and ask ourselves those questions. First, Cold Breath isn’t a magic item. Second, its description mentions no spell. Third, it’s not a spell attack. Fourth, the word “magical” appears nowhere in its description. Our conclusion: Cold Breath is not considered a magical game effect, even though we know that dragons are amazing, supernatural beings.

Detect magic, like other game mechanics, operates by this same logic with regard to what is considered magical. The spellcasting abilities of creatures (innate or otherwise) are considered “the background magic that is part of (…) the physiology of many D&D creatures”. Detect magic is designed to detect magical effects, not the background magic that suffuses creatures or the universe.


Chris Perkins confirms this sort of interpretation here:

Can detect magic detect magic potential of spellcasters even if they’re not actively casting a spell?

It’s not a wizard detector, if that’s what you mean.

Given that the question he’s responding to asks about spellcasters in general, it seems clear that his response is not specific to wizards – he’s suggesting that the spell doesn’t automatically detect spellcasters simply due to their magical abilities.

dnd 5e – Does a Divine Soul Sorcerer have access to the additional cleric spells in Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything?

Not in Adventurer’s League.

The Adventurer’s League is the official play venue for Dungeons and Dragons 5e run by Wizards of the Coast. In Adventurer’s League play, you’re limited to using the rules in the Player’s Handbook plus one other book, aside from equipment and a few specific rules mentioned in the AL player guide. That book could be Xanathar’s Guide to Everything or Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything, but you can’t use both at the same time, like using a subclass from one book and spells from another.

It’s possible that as time goes on and more books are released, this rule might be loosened or removed, but for now, it remains in force.

spellcasting – Can Spells with long casting times be disrupted by being transformed?

bit of a dense and complex question here. My character was trying to cast leomund’s tiny hut as a ritual, which because it has a long casting time, requires her to maintain concentration. The group was ambushed (though we all passed perception checks so no surprise), and the DM assumed that if he were to polymorph my character, she would lose concentration, and wouldn’t be able to finish the spell because she no longer has a spell list as a CR 0 cat.

I know concentration shouldn’t matter, but is he right about the second part? Could she finish casting the spell as a cat? Does she have to turn back into a kobold first before the spell can resolve? Does anything change if she is casting Glyph of Warding, which isn’t a ritual?

Likewise, in a similar situation, if she later gets true polymorph and turns into a Planatar, while casting raise dead would break concentration as it takes more than 1 action, would she still be able to resolve the casting at the end of 1 hour, if she maintained concentration the whole time?