most suitable NAS

I am not sure if this is the right forum but i wasn’t sure where to post my question; if this is not the right place please point me in the right direction and I’ll move the post.

This is my current situation: 3 Ubuntu desktops, 1 CentOS desktop, 2 Win 10 desktops.

The idea is to expand to: 15 ubuntu desktops, 1 CentOS, 2 Win 10 Desktops, 1 Surveillance system with eight 4k cameras, a NAS (mainly to access/store doc files and play some 4k videos).

I was curious if there is a NAS that is able to handle comfortably the access to the files (let’s say max 5 at times and mainly docs/pdf) while ensuring no lagging in the 4K buffering (videos are MKV, MPEG, QT, DIVx and some 4k).

I have been looking around and it seems that QNAP and Synology seem to be the best options. The least configuration the better. I am hoping to stay within $3500.

Thanks

NGINX vs Apache: Which One Is More Suitable For You? | Forum Promotion

Both NGINX (pronounced as “Engine-X”) and Apache are popular open-source web servers used to deliver web pages to a user’s browser. However, which one is more suitable for you? In order to run your website more efficiently, it is very important to choose a web server according to your business needs. In this article, you will learn all about NGINX vs Apache most widely used open-source webservers.

Apache was initially released in 1995, whereas Nginx was in 2004 and both are most widely used by large fortune 500 companies all over the world. Around 50% of the traffic on the internet is served by both Apache and Nginx. In some special cases, the Nginx has a competitive edge over other web servers in terms of performance.

Apache has been the first choice of developers for 20 years because of the availability of different helpful resources. Nowadays, technology is changing day by day, so due to its certain design elements, it can’t fulfill the modern web demands. Whereas the market share of NGINX is rising and getting popularity as you can view the report by w3techs.

Read More: https://www.temok.com/blog/nginx-vs-apache/

SkyNet Not Suitable For Large Forums


Before I go any further I shold preface this post by saying that on the whole I have been quite happy with SkyNet. Customer service has been generally good apart from my last ticket which was answered by someone who obviously had only read the subject and not the content! But given I have around 50 sites with them, not too bad.

However, a few weeks ago I moved a fairly large forum from AWS to my SkyNet VIP Reseller account and then the problems began.

When I say “large” I mean 16,000 registered members and approx 2000 visitors per day. So not massive but not small either.

After I moved the forum and updated it to the latest version of phpbb everything seemed ok until I started enabling the extensions that I had disabled before the forum update. I should mention that all the extensions had also been updated to be compatible with phpbb 3.3

I got as far as re-enabling 5 extensions but could do no more. When I tried for instance to enable the ‘Stop Forum Spam’ extension…which I was using previously, the forum went down and I could see in Cpanel that CPU and Memory usage was at 100% and processes were running at 87%.

I finally managed to disable the extension and everything returned to normal, until I tried another extension I had been using for ages, again with the same result.

I then though perhaps if I disable one or more of the enabled extensions it may give me some headroom but again on just trying to disable an extension I hit the same issue of maxing out cpu and memory usage.

The forum was running fine on AWS along with 10 extensions enabled. The reason I moved was because I could not update to the latest version of phpbb without paying extra to have the server instance also updated to PHP 7.3. The site generates no revenue so it is not something I can afford right now.

So I can only conclude that a SkyNet VIP reseller account is just not suitable for this type of site. I am not blaming SkyNet. All hosting has limitations of one sort or another. I just want to save others time if they are looking for hosting for a site similar to mine.

Look for something with more than 2Gb allocated memory and as many CPU cores as you can afford.

How to find what is suitable transaction fee to send 10 mBTC?

Using MultiBit Desktop Wallet, I can see that the default transaction fee is set to 0.5 mBTC per KB.

Usually that default rate worked fine. But yesterday, when I tried that and my transaction has not been confirmed for over 12 hours now.

So today I increased the fee to 1mBTC per KB and tried to send another 10mBTC to the same destination wallet. It is half an hour now and it has not confirmed either.

It is really frustrating. I’m wondering what is wrong here, and how can I choose a fee that make near instant transaction possible.

programming languages – Suitable way to round results returned by any function of a class

Assume there is a abstract class Shape. The class has two functions area() and perimeter().

Let’s say Circle and Square inherit from Shape and override these methods. Obviously the results are going to be fractional.

What is the best way to set a precision value for the results. Say the user says PRECISION=2 or PRECISION=3 and the results returned by the functions of Circle and Square class are returned accordingly. Where should I define this functionality? I was wondering how do libraries like numpy handle this situation.

One approach can be to add an optional parameter to these functions and round the results accordingly.

getArea(radius, prec=2) {

}
```

is live view or mirrorless suitable for telephoto shots of moving subjects?

(I know we’re straying into the world of video here, but I feel it’s still relevant)

Why is live view harder than “TTL”?
because you are not using the senses you were born with – that your eye & hands are easily co-ordinated to match direction, distance, speed & focus (of attention, not sharpness of image).
Catch a ball. No maths required, you just do it.
Catch a ball whilst watching your live view… maybe not.

Will you improve over time?
Yes, otherwise the entire movie industry would be full of missed shots. Almost no cinematographer has his eye right through the lens these days, there’s always some remote aspect to it – in effect, live view. Watch a steadicam operator, gazing towards his feet, where his monitor is, whilst his camera is pointed firmly at the action in front of him.
There’s a dual purpose in that, he can see what he’s shooting whilst not falling over anything.
Many pro video cameras have the same as DSLR or mirrorless cameras, a TTL & separate moveable screen(s) for remote viewing. The use of the eyepiece is becoming much more rare, the remote ‘live view’ is more common.

So, for stills what does it mean?
Mirrorless cameras currently still have both options.
The “TTL” viewfinder is a teeny TV screen, but it’s still really “through the lens”, with your face pressed against the camera, the same as ever..
The live view you’ll still have to train towards, just like every ‘movie’ cameraman working today.

Your potential pitfall, for fast action, is the frequency with which your live view updates on your screen. Modern high-end cameras have truly ‘as live’ playback; no discernible delay at all. An old entry-level consumer DSLR is going to be pretty laggy by comparison.

How do I find out which version and derivative of Ubuntu is suitable for my hardware in terms of minimal system requirements?

Preliminary remarks


First of all, there is no point in installing versions of Ubuntu that are no longer supported with updates. The reasoning is discussed at the end of this answer.

This answer focuses on currently supported versions of Ubuntu and its official derivatives.

If your hardware never connects to the internet and if you like Never use software that is newer than the installation mediaOnly then may it be advisable to use outdated versions. But who can be sure of it for all eternity?

You don't have to install Ubuntu to see if it works on your hardware. It's always a good idea Boot from Live-DVD / USB and check if the system runs fine (albeit slowly) on the specified hardware.

Even if it doesn't seem to work, you may be just a boot option from a working system. See My computer starts on a black screen. What options do I need to fix? For example the nomodeset Option could help.


Currently supported versions and their minimum requirements

The community wiki usually offers a current list of the currently supported versions. Minimum system requirements for Ubuntu can be found there in the technical data. The Ubuntu certified hardware lists may also be useful to you.

Information about the derivatives is scarce, but their requirements are less than those listed here. In general, 32-bit versions use less memory and tend to be faster than their 64-bit counterparts on older systems. Nowadays, every software requires a 64-bit architecture. If you are unsure, install the 64-bit versions.

Supported versions of Ubuntu

  • 16.04 System requirements recommended by the desktop

    To run Unity, the system needs a more powerful graphics adapter.

    • 2 GHz dual core processor or better

    • 2 GB RAM

    • 25 GB storage space

    • Graphics processor and display with a size of at least 1024 x 768

    • Either a DVD drive or a USB port for the installation medium

    • Internet access is helpful

  • 04/16 Desktop minimal

    To run Unity, the system needs a more powerful graphics adapter.

  • 17.10 and later System requirements recommended by Desktop

    • 64-bit 2 GHz dual-core processor or better

    • 4 GB RAM

    • 25 GB storage space

    • Graphics processor and display with a size of at least 1024 x 768

    • Either a DVD drive or a USB port for the installation medium

    • Internet access is helpful

  • 17.10, 18.04, 18.10, 19.04, 19.10 and 20.04 desktop minimal

    • 64-bit processor for ISO, Intel Pentium 4 processor or better for installation with the Ubuntu minimal CD. The Ubuntu Minimal CD supports the installation of Ubuntu on computers with a 32-bit processor.

    • 1 GB RAM

    • Graphics processor and display with a size of at least 1024 x 768

    • 10 GB storage space

    Ubuntu 18.04 updates will be available for 5 years through April 2023. Updates for Ubuntu 19.10 will be available for 3 months until July 2020.

  • 04/16 and 04/18 server installation standard

    • Ubuntu Server supports three main architectures: Intel x86, AMD64 and ARM.
    • 1 GHz processor
    • 512 MB system memory (RAM)
    • 1 GB storage space (basic system)
    • 1.75 GB storage space (all tasks installed)
    • Graphics card and monitor with a size of 640 x 480
  • 04/16/20/04 Server installation minimal

    • Ubuntu Server supports three main architectures: Intel x86, AMD64 and ARM.
    • 300 MHz processor
    • 256 MB system memory (RAM) 64-bit, 192 MB RAM 32-bit
    • 700 MB storage space (basic system)
    • 1.4 GB storage (all tasks installed)
    • Graphics card and monitor with a size of 640 x 480

    Security and maintenance updates are available for Ubuntu Server 16.04 through April 2021 and for Ubuntu Server 20.04 through April 2025.

Supported versions of Xubuntu

See the Xubuntu help page.

  • 16.04-18.10

    Minimum system requirements
    To install or test Xubuntu on the desktop / live CD, you need 512 MB
    Memory, 700 MHz processor and 7.5 GB of free space on your hard drive.

    Recommended system requirements
    It is recommended to use at least 1 GB of memory to ensure that multiple applications run smoothly on the desktop at the same time. It is recommended to have at least 20 GB of free space. This enables new application installations and the storage of your personal data on the hard disk in addition to the core system.

    Security and maintenance updates will be provided for Xubuntu 16.04 for 3 years until April 2019 and for Xubuntu 20.04 for 3 years until April 2023. Security and maintenance updates will be provided for Xubuntu 19.10 for 9 months through July 2020.

  • April 19 and later

    Minimum system requirements
    To install or test Xubuntu on the desktop / live CD, you need 512 MB
    Memory, 64-bit 700 MHz processor and 7.5 GB of free space on your hard drive.

    Recommended system requirements
    It is recommended to use at least 1 GB of memory to ensure that multiple applications run smoothly on the desktop at the same time. It is recommended to have at least 20 GB of free space. This enables new application installations and the storage of your personal data on the hard disk in addition to the core system.

Supported versions of Lubuntu

  • 16.04-17.10

    Processor (CPU)
    The minimum specification for the CPU is Pentium 4 or Pentium M or AMD K8. Older processors are too slow and AMD K7 has problems with flash video.

    Memory (RAM)
    Your computer requires at least 1 GB RAM for advanced Internet services such as Google+, YouTube, Google Docs and Facebook.

    For local programs such as LibreOffice and simple surfing habits, your computer needs at least 512 MB RAM.

  • April 18 and April 18

    Processor (CPU)
    The minimum specification for the CPU is Pentium 4 or Pentium M or AMD K8. Older processors are too slow and AMD K7 has problems with flash video.

    Memory (RAM)
    Your computer requires at least 2 GB of RAM for advanced Internet services such as Google+, YouTube, Google Docs and Facebook.

    For local programs such as LibreOffice and simple surfing habits, your computer needs at least 1 GB RAM.

  • April 19 and later

    Processor (CPU)
    64-bit processor

    Memory (RAM)
    Your computer requires at least 2 GB of RAM for advanced Internet services such as Google+, YouTube, Google Docs and Facebook.

    For local programs such as LibreOffice and simple surfing habits, your computer needs at least 1 GB RAM.

    Alternative ISOs from Lubuntu are intended for PCs with low RAM memory. Computers with less than 700 MB RAM are considered computers with low RAM. Instructions can be found here.

    Updates will be provided for Lubuntu 4/20 for 3 years through April 2023. Updates will be provided for Lubuntu October 19 for 9 months through April 2020.

Supported versions of Ubuntu Core

With an image size of 260 MB, Ubuntu Core is the smallest Ubuntu version to date. This makes it ideal for both IoT devices and cloud containers. A new version of Ubuntu Core is released every 2 years in even years (2016, 2018, 2020, etc.).

Processor – 600 MHz processor (ARMv7 or higher or x86)
System memory – 128 MB RAM or more
Memory – 4 GB flash / memory for factory reset and system rollback

  • Ubuntu Core 16 and 18

    Ubuntu Core 16 is based on Ubuntu 16.04 and is supported for 5 years.

    Ubuntu Core 18 is based on Ubuntu 18.04 and has been supported for 10 years.


Enter the image description here
RAM use of different flavors from 18.04. Under basic conditions (Click on the image to enlarge it)


Why you shouldn't use versions when their support has ended

  • Security risks: At some point there will be an exploit that threatens the security or system integrity of old versions of Ubuntu
  • Software incompatibilities: Versions that are no longer supported have increasing problems with this. Due to missing updates, the latest LibreOffice documents can no longer be opened or programs compiled that need newer libraries. Hardware drivers of newer devices are not included in older kernels.
  • Reduce repository availability: It can be very difficult to download software that did not ship with the outdated version. Hosting repositories for very old versions is no longer economical at some point.

Power supply – Are you wondering whether my power supply is suitable for system specifications?

My PC consists of the following components:

  • MB: MSI MPG Z390 GAMING PLUS
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-9600KF
  • GPU: GIGABYTE GeForce RTX 2070 Super Windforce OC 3X 8 GB
  • RAM: Patriot 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) 3600 MHz CL17 Viper Steel
  • Storage: 2xHDD, 3xSSD, 1xDVD-RW

After generally shared min power requirement and Outervision power supply calculator, I chose "SilentiumPC Supremo FM2 650W 80 Plus Gold" power supply because it should be enough …

CPU and GPU are overclocked with the manufacturer's default settings.

But from time to time my setup suffers from the following problem (when playing and folding @ home):

  1. totally freeze
  2. I have to force restart / shutdown
  3. If I try to switch on the PC immediately, it goes into the restart loop without entering the start phase
    (Start – shutdown – start – shutdown …).
  4. After a few ten seconds (~ 40 seconds) the loop ends and the PC starts as
    mostly.

I am using Windows 10

  • There are no logs in the event log browser for these freezes.
  • The temperatures are always low (below 55 degrees Celsius on both the CPU and the GPU).

I wonder if this is an over-performance symptom of the power supply.
And if so, should I replace this power supply with more watts?
Or should I file a complaint with the seller about supporting this configuration?

Thanks in advance 🙂

dslr – Which device is suitable for close-up pictures of electronic circuits?

I want to start a YouTube channel to explain electronics and circuitry, ideally with a quality like this video. I've watched over 50 videos on YouTube and tried to understand their settings but couldn't find the details I need.

I have a budget of around $ 600-700 (in the US) and the most important things I need are:

  • The wiring must be very clear
  • The part numbers shown on the chips are important
  • The lighting should be the same quality as in the video above and not be boring.

What kind of equipment would I need to achieve this and should I spend money on cameras, lenses, lighting equipment, or anything else?

dslr – Which camera and which lens are suitable for close-ups?

I am completely new to video and photography. I wanted to start a youtube channel to explain electronics and circuits. I wanted quality like below:

It's been 3 weeks and I've seen over 50 videos on Youtube. I referenced their video descriptions for a hint of the setups too, but not everyone shares them. Second, the domain I want to work in is completely different from them, so I'm not sure if I will get the same quality with their setups. Some people say we can buy cheap cameras, but lighting is important to achieve this clarity, others say the opposite. I've asked questions about all of these videos, but there is no answer. That's why I thought about asking the question here, adapted to my requirements. Please help:

Keep the budget as low as possible ($ 600 to $ 700). What could be the cheapest setup to get the best quality and which items should I buy?
You can assume that the only purpose of this setup is to take close-up pictures of electronic circuit boards, so the wiring has to be very clear, the numbers on the chips are important, etc. The lighting should be of the same quality as in the demo above -Link. shouldn't look boring.

Certain product names would definitely help.