teleportation – How does Jumper work with Warp in terms of carrying people with you?

Someone with the Jumper (world-jumper) advantage can escort other people with the Jumper (world-jumper) advanatge, according to b. 64. You can also take warp and the warp jump enhancement, to be able to teleport on the world you are visiting. Would this allow you to bring along other people on your warps when you are Warp Jumping? Would you be able to bring Jumpers along on Warps that remain on the same world?

dnd 5e – Can characters travel between permanent teleportation circles?

My experiences on both sides of the screen are that anything more than cosmetic adjustments – especially to abilities that players can access – are fraught with weird interactions and unintended consequences; that it’s better to build a new thing that either stands next to or replaces the thing that would be tweaked. And, counterintuitively, large-scale changes are less messy than tweaks.

Want your magic missiles to look like fireworks? No sweat.

Want to play a cleric with the druid spell list (and pretend to be a druid generally, but with channels instead of an animal companion)? Almost certainly not a problem: while potent, not a lot of edge cases to worry about.

Want an item that deals “hellfire” damage, which is like fire damage except that it bypasses resistance/invulnerability to fire damage (except when it doesn’t, because of reasons)? Just about every combat with fire-themed creatures is a debate. Oh, and does it affect creatures with vulnerability to fire like it’s fire? Better just to call it “hellfire” but have it do, say, force (or even raw, untyped) damage and pre-empt all the questions.

And, that’s before 5e’s philosophy of “just because it exists in the world doesn’t mean PCs can do it”. 5e intentionally places some abilities out of the reach of PCs (mostly by making them monster abilities). That is to say that 5e goes out of its way to give the GM the permission – and even encouragement – to look beyond the PHB when designing the world.

With that in mind, I would encourage a frame-change: instead of looking at how to tweak Teleportation Circles to fit the story you want to tell, create a new thing that’s Teleportation Circle-adjacent.

As an example, this GM would crib something from a 15+-year TV/movie franchise that produced a variant of d20 Modern: the Stargate, though with a better name in your game world; just “gates”?).

A crash-course in Stargates as presented in the series:

  • matter can only travel one-way: from the side that opened the gate to the destination
  • radio waves can travel both ways (they can use bog-standard walkie-talkies to talk to base)
  • gates can be temporarily removed them from the network by being buried
  • gates need a nearby “Dial-Home Device” (“DHD”) to dial the gate (so, you might get somewhere only to find that you can’t gate home)
    • without a DHD, dialing is possibly but extremely difficult – both physically and because it requires a staggering amount of energy
  • a gate being active means other gates can’t dial into it and it can’t dial out
  • there’s a “hard” limit on how long a gate can stay open (38 minutes), but there are a number of effects that extend that for plot reasons
  • each gate has a unique address

Those basic rules allow for a fantastic amount of versatility in how important the gate network is in any given story – from “it’s how we got to the interesting part” to “it is the interesting part”. Further: disruptions in the gate network don’t necessarily prevent Teleportation Circle (or other teleportation effects) from working – or vice-versa.

And, a gate network doesn’t negate the usefulness of Teleportation Circles generally (eg., wizards might still want them in their towers so they can get home faster; guilds may still have a few for members, etc.).

… and, surely there’s no magic out there that can connect to a gate without already having a gate, right? …

dnd 5e – traveling between permanent teleportation circles

The Teleportation Circle spell (PHB pg. 282) states that in order for the spellcaster to “target” a remote teleportation circle he or she must know that remote circle’s unique sigil sequence. What if a player or party wants to use a permanent teleportation circle to teleport to another permanent circle? This use case is not covered – or am I missing it?

I am including permanent teleportation circles in my campaign as sort of a municipal service “if you can afford or justify it” to get from one city to the next (and it won’t always be safe, no). I have some ideas about how to set it up (as in how to have a “local spellcaster” set a destination for the portal) but I am curious if there is a method already defined elsewhere.

As pointed out by @enkryptor below players can learn the sigils for remote permanent teleportation circles and access them directly. In some locations (larger cities, for example) access to the circles could be closely guarded and controlled, while in other areas the circles may be abandoned (still functional) or dead.

If players were teleporting from the large city of Messantia to the even larger city of Tarantia it would be a lot like highly privileged (and probably very expensive) public transit.

If players learned the sigil for the permanent teleportation circle in Tarantia and teleported to it “from the wild, without an appointment” they’d be met by armed guards and murder holes. In other places, who knows what they’ll find.

I think the answer to my original question is “this page intentionally left blank”.

Working on it. Thanks for any feedback!

dnd 5e – How many creatures can step through a Teleportation Circle before it closes?

Now there’s a fun question! If you and your friends are in a hurry, don’t want to get hurt and don’t have any buildings nearby, 864 of you can teleport with one casting of Teleportation Circle.

Otherwise you can fit 338304 medium or small creatures with 30ft walking speed through a single cast of Teleportation Circle – Now there’s some spell slot efficiency! Most of them will end up dead, but that’s beside the point.

The key is to build a 117 story skyscraper above the Teleportation Circle with 1.5m high halfling style ceilings and a 10ft square hole in the middle of every floor above the Teleportation Circle. Why? Well, on the turn when a creature starts falling, it immediately falls a turn’s worth of distance.

  1. Mike Mearls made this neat falling time and speed calculator: https://www.angio.net/personal/climb/speed
  2. Enter height as 117 * 1.5m = 175.5m and you’ll get less than 1 round (6s) of falling time.

The creatures take falling damage (20d6 bludgeoning damage from 41st floor upwards) and then teleport to the nearest unoccupied space at the destination teleportation circle.

Here’s the math: The portal closes at the end of its caster’s next turn, so everyone has one turn to get in. First they all crowd around the hole on their floor in order of increasing initiative so they won’t get in each other’s way. Then everyone besides the caster readies a Dash action, which gives them 30ft of movement when a condition is triggered. Let’s say the condition is “Having a free direct path to the hole on my floor after Teleportation Circle is cast below it.”. After everyone’s ready, the caster (one with the lowest initiative on the 1st floor) casts the circle and walks into it (lucky bastard). Then floor by floor everyone Dashes for their floor’s hole on the caster’s turn. Those within 30ft make it on the caster’s turn. Others use the readied Dash to fill all spaces within 60ft of the hole to move and then Dash again on their next turn. This way a total of 101088 creatures would enter the portal – 192 creatures per floor with the readied Dash and 672 per floor on the next round (192 + 672 creatures from 117 floors = 101088).

Why 192 and 672?

  1. A medium or small creature occupies a 5ft square area.
  2. On a square grid diagonal movement costs as much as lateral.
  3. The hole above the teleportation circle is a 10ft square.
  4. 30ft of movement allows us to empty an area of (35+35)^2 – 10^2 square feet around the hole on each floor. In creatures that’s (7+7)^2 – 2^2 = 192.
  5. 60ft of movement allows us to empty an area of (65+65)^2 – 10^2 square feet around the hole on each floor. In creatures that’s (13+13)^2 – 2^2 = 672.

To take the sillyness even further we add another 353 floors to that skyscraper (those will have a height between 177 and 705 meters, as it takes 12 seconds to fall 706m) and fill it with creatures below the caster’s initiative, have them Dash into a hole and start falling one turn before the portal is opened, then next turn the portal is opened on the caster’s turn just before they splatter through it on their initiative order, adding another 237216 likely dead creatures (353 floors * 672 creatures per floor), just so you can get the most value out of your 5th level spell slot! The Universe will also present you with the “Most dead creatures teleported” achievement and will disconnect you from the overcrowded tabletop game instance =P

Godot – Collision for character teleportation

I’m currently working on a little game to discover Godot game engine.

It’s a Top-Down game and I want my character to be able to teleport through walls.

I thought to dupplicate my character’s collision box and to set its position to the teleportation’s position but I didn’t find a way to check if there is a collision to this new position.

Any advise?

dnd 5e – Does a drawn Teleportation Circle remain after it has been used?

No.

The Material Components section of the Teleportation Circle spell specifies that the rare gem-infused chalks and inks that are used are consumed by the spell.

Consumed is “consumed”. Not “rendered inert” or “deactivated” or “turned to dust” or whatever. Consumed means it’s gone.

While it is not 100% written specifically so, it is not a major leap of plain basic common sense to just assume that those rare chalks and inks are exactly what’s used to draw the teleportation circle itself. And thus, as they get consumed, as per RAW it means they’re fully gone.

Of course, a DM might decide that all materials components, once used up, turn to some kind of dust instead of poof they’re fully gone. But as per RAW, consumed material components don’t get transmuted into something else, they just wink out. There is not anywhere some kind of specified “consumption” done in a “digestion-like” process that would input “fresh-level magic-usable material components” and output “manure-level magic-unusable material residue”. It’s not the “somebody eating food and excreting poop” kind of consumption, more like the video game “your character consumed five mana points to cast that spell” kind of consumption. There is nothing left of it.

So, basically, it goes like this:

  • Casting: 1 minute, drawing the magic circle with the rare chalks/inks.

  • Casting complete: Spell duration begins. The material components gets consumed, thus the material circle disappears. However, there is instantly and immediately a magical luminous version of the same drawn circle that appears to replace it, seemingly seamlessly.

  • At the end of 1 round later: End of spell, thus the magical version of the circle also disappears.

Exception: If you cast the spell every day for 1 year, the last casting is not 1 round duration, but Permanent duration.

Now, that last past seems to imply that there is some kind of “counter” thing going on, almost as if as the spell left over some kind of residual magical energy left over in that spot. Or somehow the universe itself “remembers” what you did in that spot or gets “imprinted” somehow.

So, now, it all depends on how your DM interprets this last part. He might go two ways:

#1 – Nope, no weird unexplained “after effect” magical residual traces. Once the spell ends, it’s gone, end of story. The fact that repeated castings eventually make the last casting permanent doesn’t specify any such “residual magics” or “universal memory or imprint” in RAW, so there is none. The spell itself seemingly goes to check the past, and that’s it. Pursuers thus detect nothing special. This is a DM “playing it safe and by the book”.

#2 – Hmm, DM decides that yeah, there is some kind of magical residual “leftover aura” or whatever, lasting at least until the next casting the next day, so that there can eventually be some kind of “cumulative” effect to stack up enough magical power there, to allow the last casting 1 year later to be done on a sufficiently powerful “mass” of “accumulated” magical residue, to power “enough” the last casting so that it become permanent instead. Thus the DM gives a chance for pursuers to detect something. This is a fully arbitrary DM call and ruling. Maybe a simple Detect Magic is enough to readily see it. Maybe you also need See Invisibility because “residual magics” are so weak they are invisible to sight EVEN with Detect Magic. Maybe a Perception check is needed too. Maybe a special magical item is needed to see “residual magical auras”. Maybe True Seeing is a must. Any of these, or a combo of some or all of these, or some great divinatory process or whatever your DM might come up with after smoking some way too good stuff. Whatever. This is a DM using RAW to spin a cool (but not necessarily wisely built) story.

Personally, I am big fan of Option #2.
🙂

dnd 5e – Do teleportation spells conserve momentum?

I am going to answer this in a different way, by justifying a re-framing of the question first.

When you try to justify how magic works in a role playing game that is not designed to cater for such things (such as D&D 5e) it leads you down a rabbit hole where the whole magic system, the whole game, starts unravelling and often becomes unplayable.

Why do I say this? D&D 5e is only meant to loosely simulate the real world (find discussions on what hit points are or on falling damage to see that). It is far better described as a game that provides rules which help you collaboratively create heroic stories set in a fantasy world (though generally I wouldn’t, it sounds far too pompous).

Within these rules there is a system for producing magical effects, things that just can’t be done in the real world. Magic is the word we have for things that we can’t explain using our current understanding of the laws of physics. Things just happen as a result of magic.

As soon as you try to use the “conservation of momentum” law about any one spell, then you are accepting the proposition that our real physical laws apply and then, to pick the most obvious spell, Wish stops working because it horribly violates the laws of thermodynamics.

So instead of asking “Do teleportation spells conserve momentum?” you need to ask a different question, as “momentum” is not a concept that exists in the game to explain how things work. The alternative question I would suggest is: “Does a moving target of a teleportation spell carry on moving once they change position?” and it is that question I will try to answer.

Movement by creatures in D&D is done in discrete “chunks”. The story might be “The wizard ran from one side of the door to the other, casting a magic missile at the enemy as they past the opening, diving back into cover before getting filled full of arrows”. However the game is run in discrete steps so this could be: wizard moves 10′, casts a spell, moves 10′ with no requirement for a character to continue moving at each stage no matter how fast they are going.

As such there is no momentum, no pre-determination. Where the character goes next can be decided by the player at each 5′ step on a grid or any value if not using a grid. For instance the wizard’s player could decide it stays in the door rather than go the final 5′ of the second 10′ move into cover due to the consequences of the spell cast.

Movement and Position (PHB p.190):

However you’re moving, you deduct the distance of each part of your move from your speed until it is used up or until you are done moving.

if you have a speed of 30 feet, you can move 10 feet, take your action, and then move 20 feet.

So what if the wizard used a Dash action to move 60′, i.e. as fast as possible (as a story this would be “the wizard run as fast as they could”). However they get teleported by a trap they step on to a position directly in front of a wall after moving only 50′ of the movement. What happens? Are they required to run into the wall at full tilt and take damage or can they just decide not to take the next 10′ of movement?

The rules say they can just not take any more movement. That there is no momentum. The story may be “the wizard ran as fast as they could across the teleportation trap and disappeared. A moment later they were in front of a wall of spikes 30′ away, but pulled up just in time to stop being skewered.”

So applying all this to your first question:

if I were to take a running leap and then Dimension Door forward, would I continue to be propelled forward by my momentum (assuming that I still have a number of feet of movement speed remaining), or would that dissipate as part of the spell.

and bringing in a couple more rules:

Movement and Position (PHB p.190):

If you have more than one speed, such as your walking speed and a flying speed, you can switch back and forth between your speeds during your move. Whenever you switch, subtract the distance you’ve already moved from the new speed. The result determines how much farther you can move.

Jumping (PHB p.182):

LongJump. When you make a long jump, you cover a number of feet up to your Strength score if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. When you make a standing long jump, you can leap only half that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a foot of movement

This would mean that if someone takes a running jump and go 10′ of their possible 15′ (say) jump distance, then they take an action to cast dimension door (we won’t get into whether you can do this in the middle of a jump) and teleport 200′ to a new position, then they are then free to use whatever speed they have remaining, say either the remaining 5′ of their jump or, if they teleported onto a surface, some or all of their remaining walking movement. The rules do not require the use of the remaining 5′ of jump, but you can. There is no momentum and the story description comes afterwards.

Your second question is actually a different case because it is about a moving object not a creature, which is handled differently in the rules:

Similarly, if I were to launch a cannon ball from a cannon and then Teleport it into the throne room of a local king, would the cannon ball continue traveling forward at the same velocity or would it simply drop to the ground (given that the Teleport spell was successful)?

The game says nothing about projectiles spending any time in the intervening space between source and target. An arrow hits as soon as the character shoots, a fireball explodes at the moment it is cast. Even a ready action cannot intercept the projectile mid-flight (PHB p.192 Ready: “When the trigger occurs, you can either take your reaction right after the trigger finishes or ignore the trigger”).

So this case cannot occur within the game rules as you cannot cast a spell on a projectile mid-flight. If a situation is set up that does not follow the normal game rules then it can do whatever the DM wants it to and the question becomes immaterial.

Finally the case where the projectile passes through a “gate” or a “portal” i.e. is teleported by passing through a pre-existing environmental magical effect rather than having a spell cast upon it, then it becomes the call of the DM whether it continues through and completes to move, as there is no RAW guidance about this situation that I know of. I believe that most DMs, like myself, would make the call that it did complete it’s trajectory, though I can see how it could be justified otherwise.

In the end I think it is best to say that it is good to be reminded that the best story and consistency should rule. That almost always means that in 5e real world science as an explanation should lose out to “it is magic” every time.

dnd 5e – Is 5th teleportation circle possible in 3.5?

In 3.5 D & D, "Teleportation Circle" is the name of a 9th level summoning spell. The purpose of the spell is to create a circle that stays for 10 minutes and to expose anyone who enters it during this time to a "larger teleport" to a specific location.

In 5e, however, the same name refers to a 5th level summoning spell. This spell also creates a circle, and anyone who enters it before the end of the next round of the caster is teleported into an existing, identical circle. A reception circle can be formed by casting this spell in the same place every day for a year.

Is there an official way to replicate the effects of the 5e version of this spell in 3.5? If not, would it cause any inherent problems if brought into play as a custom spell?

dnd 5e – Do teleportation spells gain momentum?

I will answer this in a different way by first justifying the question again.

If you try to justify how magic works in an RPG that is not designed for such things (like D & D 5e), it will lead you into a rabbit hole where the whole magical system, the whole game, begins to unravel and often becomes unplayable.

Why am I saying this? D&D 5e is only intended to simulate the real world loosely (find discussions about what hit points or falling damage to see). It's far better to describe than a game that has rules that allow you to create heroic stories together in a fantasy world (although I wouldn't generally do that, it sounds far too pompous).

Within these rules there is a system for creating magical effects, things that are simply not possible in the real world. Magic is the word we have for things we have can't explain using our current understanding of the laws of physics. things just happened as a result of magic.

Once you try to apply the law to preserve momentum for a single spell, you accept the thesis that our real physical laws apply, and to choose the most obvious spell, Wish stops working because it terribly violates the laws of thermodynamics ,

Instead of asking, "Do teleportation spells get momentum?" You have to ask another question, since "momentum" is not an in-game concept to explain how things work. The alternative question I would suggest is: "Does a moving target of a teleportation spell move as soon as it changes position?" and I will try to answer this question.

The movement of the creatures in D&D takes place in discrete "pieces". The story could be: "The wizard ran from side to side of the door and threw a magic missile at the enemy as it passed the opening. He took cover again before being filled with arrows." However, the game is played in discrete steps. This can be: Magician moves 10 & # 39;, casts a spell, moves 10 & # 39; without Requirement so that a character moves on in every phase, no matter how fast he goes.

As such, there is none momentum, no predetermination. Where the character goes next, the player can decide on a grid or any value every 5 -S step if he does not use a grid. For example, the wizard's player might choose to stay in the door rather than the last 5 & # 39; of the second 10 & # 39; to take cover due to the consequences of the spell.

Movement and position (PHB p.190):

Regardless of how you move, subtract the distance of each part of your movement from your speed until it is used up or until you are finished moving.

If you have a speed of 30 feet, you can move 10 feet, do your action, and then move 20 feet.

What if the assistant used a dash action to move 60 minutes, i.e. H. As soon as possible (as a story this would be "the assistant will run as soon as possible"). However, they are teleported by a trap, which they step into a position directly in front of a wall after moving only 50 minutes of movement. What happens? Do they have to run against the wall with full inclination and take damage or can they simply choose not to do the next 10 minutes of movement?

The rules say that they simply cannot start moving. That there is no swing. The story could read: "The magician ran as fast as he could over the teleportation trap and disappeared. A moment later they were standing in front of a wall of spines 30’ away, but stopped just in time to avoid being impaled. "

Apply all of this to your first question:

If I jumped and then sized the door forward, I would continue to be propelled by my swing (assuming I still have a few feet of movement speed left) or would dissolve as part of the spell.

and introduce a few more rules:

Movement and position (PHB p.190):

If you have more than one speed, e.g. B. Your walking speed and a flight speed, you can switch between your speeds as you move. If you switch, subtract the distance already traveled from the new speed. The result determines how far you can move.

Leap (PHB p.182):

Long jump. When making a long jump, cover a number of feet to your strength if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. If you do a standing long jump, you can only jump half of this distance. In any case, each foot that you clear during the jump costs one foot of movement

This would mean that someone who makes a run jump and 10 seiner of his possible 15 ’ (say) jump distance goes, takes an action to throw the dimension door (we won't go into whether you can do a jump in the middle) and teleport 200 & to a new position, then you can do that use remaining speed, either the remaining 5 & # 39; their jump or, if teleported to a surface, some or all of the remaining steps of movement. The rules do not require the use of the remaining 5 ’jump, but you can. There is no swing and the description of the story comes afterwards.

Your second question is actually a different case, since it's a moving object, not a creature that's treated differently in the rules:

If I fired a cannonball from a cannon and then teleported it to a local king's throne room, would the cannonball move forward at the same speed or would it just fall to the ground (assuming the teleport spell was successful)?

The game says nothing about projectiles that are in the space between the source and the target. An arrow hits as soon as the character shoots, a fireball explodes the moment it is cast. Even one ready Action cannot intercept the projectile during flight (PHB p.192 Ready: "If the trigger occurs, you can either take your reaction right after the trigger ends or ignore the trigger ").

This case cannot occur within the rules of the game, since you cannot cast a spell on a projectile during the flight. If a situation is established that does not conform to the normal rules of the game, it can do what the DM wants and the question becomes irrelevant.

Finally, the case where the projectile goes through a "gate" or "portal", that is, teleports through an already existing magical environmental effect, rather than being cast a spell on it, to the DM's call to continue through and complete, to move around since there is no RAW guide to this situation that I know of. I believe that most DMs, like me, would make the call that they had completed their trajectory, although I can see how it could be justified otherwise.

In the end, I think it's best to say that it's good to be reminded that the best story and consistency should prevail. That almost always means that in the real world, science should lose "it's magic" every time as an explanation.