Creating a view which lists all taxnomy terms and the number they appear in a content type?

So i have a taxonomy called Product Warnings, and it has around 10 terms. This taxonomy is referenced in several content types (Small products, Large products, etc), and can be selected multiple times (so a user can select in the content type 1 or up to all 10 terms from the Taxonomy).

I want to create a view which lists all terms from the given taxonomy (that’s the easy part), and also count the number of times each terms is referenced in a specific content type (i.e. Small products)

So it would look like:

Eye damage: 44
Skin irritation: 13
Hair lose: 1 
.
.
.

Now, this is fairly easy to do with a db_query and custom code, but the trick is to do it in a view (if it’s possible)

For content, what are the differences between nodes and terms

Nodes are content. Terms are for categorization of content, they are not content themselves.

Terms are part of taxonomies. Taxonomy is the science of classification.

The relation between nodes and taxonomy terms is that you attach taxonomy terms to nodes, to categorize the node. So if you have a blog node, you may have topics or tags, that would be attached to the blog node. You can use that to find all blogs of a certain category, or tagged with a given term. You can think of hashtags on common SNS sites as being like taxonomy terms. When you click on the hashtag, you can see all posts with that hashtag. The hashtag essentially categorizes the post.

You have listed some ways in which nodes and terms share technical implementations, such as having revisions. But how they are used is entirely different.

custom post types – The Difference Between Categories and Tags and Taxonomies and Terms

I’ve got a custom post type ‘articles’ and I’ve added a custom taxonomy ‘articles_categories’ which has its own terms.

I was under the impression you can’t have categories and tags on custom post types? But I can’t see how Taxonomies and Terms are the same? And if you can have categories and tags on custom post types what is the reasoning for using custom Taxonomies? It’s all very confusing.

Could someone explain the context of taxonomies and why can’t you use categories and tags on custom post types?

Many thanks in advance

usability – Technical terms linking vertical lists to Instructions

I once read a study where it described that displaying information vertically hints/implies to the user that it is instructions. I tried searching for proof of this concept again and couldn’t find it this time.

Does anyone know any key terms/concepts relating to information being displayed vertically rather than horizontally means its implying that the information is instructions/guidelines to follow.

Heres an example of what I mean.

enter image description here

mysql – Are TRIGGERs disadvantageous for each upvote / downvote in terms of performance?

I am planning three tables: Users, User_Reputation and Voting_Records. The Users The table would contain the primary key id for registered users, along with personal information such as email and passwords. If they rate something positively, it will be in the Voting_Records like so:

+------+-------------+-----------+--------+
|  id  |   user_id   | author_id |  vote  |
+------+-------------+-----------+--------+
|  3   |   12389129  |  123421   |   -1   |
+------+-------------+-----------+--------+

With the user_id and author_id to be a foreign key id In the user table, this would subtract 1 from the general reputation.

So instead of using it SUM() This would be more advantageous each time a user asks for his entire reputation TRIGGER to update that total_votes on the User_Reputation Table every time someone upvotes / downvotes in his profile? It would definitely be easier to implement features like badges that would automatically be given to people with more than X points.

Terms and conditions

Any advice on what to include in the terms and conditions? Where can I get a template?

Any help would be appreciated …. | Read the rest of https://www.webhostingtalk.com/showthread.php?t=1808358&goto=newpost

How do I find out which version and derivative of Ubuntu is suitable for my hardware in terms of minimal system requirements?

Preliminary remarks


First of all, there is no point in installing versions of Ubuntu that are no longer supported with updates. The reasoning is discussed at the end of this answer.

This answer focuses on currently supported versions of Ubuntu and its official derivatives.

If your hardware never connects to the internet and if you like Never use software that is newer than the installation mediaOnly then may it be advisable to use outdated versions. But who can be sure of it for all eternity?

You don't have to install Ubuntu to see if it works on your hardware. It's always a good idea Boot from Live-DVD / USB and check if the system runs fine (albeit slowly) on the specified hardware.

Even if it doesn't seem to work, you may be just a boot option from a working system. See My computer starts on a black screen. What options do I need to fix? For example the nomodeset Option could help.


Currently supported versions and their minimum requirements

The community wiki usually offers a current list of the currently supported versions. Minimum system requirements for Ubuntu can be found there in the technical data. The Ubuntu certified hardware lists may also be useful to you.

Information about the derivatives is scarce, but their requirements are less than those listed here. In general, 32-bit versions use less memory and tend to be faster than their 64-bit counterparts on older systems. Nowadays, every software requires a 64-bit architecture. If you are unsure, install the 64-bit versions.

Supported versions of Ubuntu

  • 16.04 System requirements recommended by the desktop

    To run Unity, the system needs a more powerful graphics adapter.

    • 2 GHz dual core processor or better

    • 2 GB RAM

    • 25 GB storage space

    • Graphics processor and display with a size of at least 1024 x 768

    • Either a DVD drive or a USB port for the installation medium

    • Internet access is helpful

  • 04/16 Desktop minimal

    To run Unity, the system needs a more powerful graphics adapter.

  • 17.10 and later System requirements recommended by Desktop

    • 64-bit 2 GHz dual-core processor or better

    • 4 GB RAM

    • 25 GB storage space

    • Graphics processor and display with a size of at least 1024 x 768

    • Either a DVD drive or a USB port for the installation medium

    • Internet access is helpful

  • 17.10, 18.04, 18.10, 19.04, 19.10 and 20.04 desktop minimal

    • 64-bit processor for ISO, Intel Pentium 4 processor or better for installation with the Ubuntu minimal CD. The Ubuntu Minimal CD supports the installation of Ubuntu on computers with a 32-bit processor.

    • 1 GB RAM

    • Graphics processor and display with a size of at least 1024 x 768

    • 10 GB storage space

    Ubuntu 18.04 updates will be available for 5 years through April 2023. Updates for Ubuntu 19.10 will be available for 3 months until July 2020.

  • 04/16 and 04/18 server installation standard

    • Ubuntu Server supports three main architectures: Intel x86, AMD64 and ARM.
    • 1 GHz processor
    • 512 MB system memory (RAM)
    • 1 GB storage space (basic system)
    • 1.75 GB storage space (all tasks installed)
    • Graphics card and monitor with a size of 640 x 480
  • 04/16/20/04 Server installation minimal

    • Ubuntu Server supports three main architectures: Intel x86, AMD64 and ARM.
    • 300 MHz processor
    • 256 MB system memory (RAM) 64-bit, 192 MB RAM 32-bit
    • 700 MB storage space (basic system)
    • 1.4 GB storage (all tasks installed)
    • Graphics card and monitor with a size of 640 x 480

    Security and maintenance updates are available for Ubuntu Server 16.04 through April 2021 and for Ubuntu Server 20.04 through April 2025.

Supported versions of Xubuntu

See the Xubuntu help page.

  • 16.04-18.10

    Minimum system requirements
    To install or test Xubuntu on the desktop / live CD, you need 512 MB
    Memory, 700 MHz processor and 7.5 GB of free space on your hard drive.

    Recommended system requirements
    It is recommended to use at least 1 GB of memory to ensure that multiple applications run smoothly on the desktop at the same time. It is recommended to have at least 20 GB of free space. This enables new application installations and the storage of your personal data on the hard disk in addition to the core system.

    Security and maintenance updates will be provided for Xubuntu 16.04 for 3 years until April 2019 and for Xubuntu 20.04 for 3 years until April 2023. Security and maintenance updates will be provided for Xubuntu 19.10 for 9 months through July 2020.

  • April 19 and later

    Minimum system requirements
    To install or test Xubuntu on the desktop / live CD, you need 512 MB
    Memory, 64-bit 700 MHz processor and 7.5 GB of free space on your hard drive.

    Recommended system requirements
    It is recommended to use at least 1 GB of memory to ensure that multiple applications run smoothly on the desktop at the same time. It is recommended to have at least 20 GB of free space. This enables new application installations and the storage of your personal data on the hard disk in addition to the core system.

Supported versions of Lubuntu

  • 16.04-17.10

    Processor (CPU)
    The minimum specification for the CPU is Pentium 4 or Pentium M or AMD K8. Older processors are too slow and AMD K7 has problems with flash video.

    Memory (RAM)
    Your computer requires at least 1 GB RAM for advanced Internet services such as Google+, YouTube, Google Docs and Facebook.

    For local programs such as LibreOffice and simple surfing habits, your computer needs at least 512 MB RAM.

  • April 18 and April 18

    Processor (CPU)
    The minimum specification for the CPU is Pentium 4 or Pentium M or AMD K8. Older processors are too slow and AMD K7 has problems with flash video.

    Memory (RAM)
    Your computer requires at least 2 GB of RAM for advanced Internet services such as Google+, YouTube, Google Docs and Facebook.

    For local programs such as LibreOffice and simple surfing habits, your computer needs at least 1 GB RAM.

  • April 19 and later

    Processor (CPU)
    64-bit processor

    Memory (RAM)
    Your computer requires at least 2 GB of RAM for advanced Internet services such as Google+, YouTube, Google Docs and Facebook.

    For local programs such as LibreOffice and simple surfing habits, your computer needs at least 1 GB RAM.

    Alternative ISOs from Lubuntu are intended for PCs with low RAM memory. Computers with less than 700 MB RAM are considered computers with low RAM. Instructions can be found here.

    Updates will be provided for Lubuntu 4/20 for 3 years through April 2023. Updates will be provided for Lubuntu October 19 for 9 months through April 2020.

Supported versions of Ubuntu Core

With an image size of 260 MB, Ubuntu Core is the smallest Ubuntu version to date. This makes it ideal for both IoT devices and cloud containers. A new version of Ubuntu Core is released every 2 years in even years (2016, 2018, 2020, etc.).

Processor – 600 MHz processor (ARMv7 or higher or x86)
System memory – 128 MB RAM or more
Memory – 4 GB flash / memory for factory reset and system rollback

  • Ubuntu Core 16 and 18

    Ubuntu Core 16 is based on Ubuntu 16.04 and is supported for 5 years.

    Ubuntu Core 18 is based on Ubuntu 18.04 and has been supported for 10 years.


Enter the image description here
RAM use of different flavors from 18.04. Under basic conditions (Click on the image to enlarge it)


Why you shouldn't use versions when their support has ended

  • Security risks: At some point there will be an exploit that threatens the security or system integrity of old versions of Ubuntu
  • Software incompatibilities: Versions that are no longer supported have increasing problems with this. Due to missing updates, the latest LibreOffice documents can no longer be opened or programs compiled that need newer libraries. Hardware drivers of newer devices are not included in older kernels.
  • Reduce repository availability: It can be very difficult to download software that did not ship with the outdated version. Hosting repositories for very old versions is no longer economical at some point.

Terms – Sort get_terms by number using a custom taxonomy

When I test get_terms with normal WordPress posts, it seems to work. However, it does not work with the WooCommerces "product_cat" custom taxonomy if you order for anything. I try to order by number and it returns by name.

These categories are nested 3 levels deep in the category tree. Maybe that affects it?

$ cat = get_terms (array (
& # 39; taxonomy & # 39; => & # 39; product_cat & # 39 ;,
& # 39; hide_empty & # 39; => false,
& # 39; orderby & # 39; => & # 39; count & # 39 ;,
& # 39; order & # 39; => & # 39; DESC & # 39 ;,
& # 39; number & # 39; => 5,
));
Echo & # 39;

'; print_r($cats); echo '

& # 39 ;;