enormous berry on earth at the time,

Well known for its highly antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Small and delicious, the dark red maqui is considered an ideal berry, as it is usually a rich source of the nutrients A and C, potassium, calcium and iron. The Maqui berries originate from the Patagonia region in the southern United States, where the Mapuche Indians used the leaves of the maqui berry plant to make fermented drinks that were part of their warrior's normally liquid weight-loss plan. ,

enormous berry on earth at the time,

apache kafka – Efficient options for stream joins (with big time gaps)

Use Case: I need to connect two stream sources (eg orders(order_id, order_val) and shipments(shipment_id, shipment_val)) based on an ID (order_id = shipment_id) and generate a new event shipment_order(id, order_val, shipment_val)

Note that the gap between events can be very large (1 year – 2 years).
Ex: order(order_id = 1, value=1) could arrive today, but the shipment(shipment_id=1, value=2) could arrive after one year.

I examine patterns to achieve window-efficient stream joins:

  1. Save events to DynamoDB (or other datastore) and reissue events via DynamoDB streams (modify data collection in general). If either a DDB order event or a DDB shipping event arrives, I will check DynamoDB for both events using the DDB event ID and make a join and send a new cargo_order

  2. Kafka Stream is used with large windows (2 years)

Ask:

  1. What are some good patterns for getting such big window joins?

  2. Is stateful systems such as Kafka recommending a 2-year window join? (What are the implications?)

Note: Assume that the system handles about 200 million events per day with spikes. By efficiency I mean the overall time / cost efficiency (and tradeoffs).

Networking – Delta Time in a Lockstep Multiplayer Game

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Time Complexity – Big Theta Proof can not be completed

Prove this with the definition of the Θ notation

$ (3 n + 13) (7 n + 2) left ( log left (1024 n ^ {2} + 100 right) right) in
Theta left (n ^ {2} log n right) $

I also found a useful example in Stack exchange:

Big theta proof for the polynomial function

But my example has $ log $ Function, these are my steps:

apparently

begin {equation}
g (n) = n ^ {2} log n, f (n) = (3 n + 13) (7 n + 2) left ( log left (1024 n ^ {2} + 100 right) right)
end {equation}

Then we can get to the denomination of big-theta

begin {equation}
0 leqslant c_ {1} n ^ {2} log n leqslant (3 n + 13) (7 n + 2) left ( log left (1024 n ^ {2} + 100 right) right ) leqslant c_ {2} n ^ {2} log n
end {equation}

Divide the inequality by the largest n-term of the order we get

begin {equation}
0 leqslant c_ {1} leqslant left (21+ frac {97} {n} + frac {26} {n ^ {2}} right) log _ {n} left (1024 n ^ {2} +100 right) leqslant c_ {2}
end {equation}

(I see that $ n neq 1 $I think it's right, so I choose $ n geqslant $ 2)

by calculate the limit

begin {equation}
lim _ {n rightarrow infty} left (21+ frac {97} {n} + frac {26} {n ^ {2}} right) log _ {n} left (1024 n ^ {2} +100 right) = 42
end {equation}

we know $ c_2 = 42 $ when $ n geqslant $ 2, then I should choose a constant that is less than 42, then it should meet the LHS.

I choose $ c_1 = 41 $, To the $ n $I choose too $ 2 $ that can satisfy LHS.

So the constants that prove

$ (3 n + 13) (7 n + 2) left ( log left (1024 n ^ {2} + 100 right) right) in
Theta left (n ^ {2} log n right) $

are $ c_1 = 41, c_2 = 42, n geqslant $ 2

My steps or answers are right or wrong? Please explain or correct my mistake.

Which aspects influence the runtime / translation time / execution time?

Can I get a clear explanation of how this affects the runtime / compile time and execution time of the code?
I've heard that they corresponded to different processes when my code was converted to assembly language and finally executed. But what exactly contributes to a different "time" and which of these "time" is saved in the "coding efficiency"?

P.S. I have the following two similar functions to reverse an integer:

 int reverse(int x) {
        long i = 0;
        long j = x;

        while(j)
        {
            i = 10*i + (j%10);
            j = j/10;
            if(iINT_MAX)
            {
                  return 0;
            }
        }
        return i;
    }

and

int reverse(int x) {
        long i = 0;
        long j = x;

        while(j)
        {
            i = 10*i + (j%10);
            j = j/10;
        }
        if(iINT_MAX)
        {
            return 0;
        }
        return i;
    }

As you can see, the former has the if Sentence within the while Loop and set the latter if outside the loop. If I execute these two codes, it turns out that the duration of the former function is shorter than that of the latter, which in my opinion should be exactly the opposite (because I thought of the former function, if Instruction would be executed every time, but the latter only needs to be executed if finally)
What idea did I do wrong?

java – Why my app crashes every time I start the logcat, suggest what to do. I'm new to Android development

2019-09-21 17: 27: 28.662 678-704 / in.gntex.ecommapp D / FA: Message logging enabled at debug level
2019-09-21 17: 27: 28.668 678-678 / in.gntex.ecommapp D / Android Runtime: Shutting down the VM
2019-09-21 17: 27: 28.670 678-678 / in.gntex.ecommapp E / Android Runtime: FATAL EXCEPTION: main
Process: in.gntex.ecommapp, PID: 678
java.lang.RuntimeException: Activity ComponentInfo {in.gntex.ecommapp / in.gntex.ecommapp.SplashActivity} can not be started: android.view.InflateException: Binary XML file Line 2: Binary XML file Line 2: Error occurred Inflating the class Android
at android.app.ActivityThread.performLaunchActivity (ActivityThread.java:2678)
at android.app.ActivityThread.handleLaunchActivity (ActivityThread.java:2743)
at android.app.ActivityThread.-wrap12 (ActivityThread.java)
at android.app.ActivityThread $ H.handleMessage (ActivityThread.java:1490)
at android.os.Handler.dispatchMessage (Handler.java:102)
at android.os.Looper.loop (Looper.java:154)
at android.app.ActivityThread.main (ActivityThread.java:6165)
at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke (native method)
at com.android.internal.os.ZygoteInit $ MethodAndArgsCaller.run (ZygoteInit.java:888)
at com.android.internal.os.ZygoteInit.main (ZygoteInit.java:778)
Caused by: android.view.InflateException: Line 2 of the binary XML file: Line 2 of the binary XML file: Error inflating the android class
Caused by: android.view.InflateException: Binary XML file Line 2: Error inflating the android class
Trigger: java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: The class "android.view.android" was not in the path "DexPathList ((zip-file" /data/app/in.gntex.ecommapp-2/base.apk"),nativeLibraryDirectories ") found = (/ data / app / in.gntex.ecommapp-2 / lib / poor, / system / lib, / vendor / lib))
at dalvik.system.BaseDexClassLoader.findClass (BaseDexClassLoader.java:56)
at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass (ClassLoader.java:380)
at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass (ClassLoader.java:312)
at android.view.LayoutInflater.createView (LayoutInflater.java:609)
at android.view.LayoutInflater.onCreateView (LayoutInflater.java:700)
at com.android.internal.policy.PhoneLayoutInflater.onCreateView (PhoneLayoutInflater.java:68)
at android.view.LayoutInflater.onCreateView (LayoutInflater.java:717)
at android.view.LayoutInflater.createViewFromTag (LayoutInflater.java:785)
at android.view.LayoutInflater.createViewFromTag (LayoutInflater.java:727)
at android.view.LayoutInflater.inflate (LayoutInflater.java:495)
at android.view.LayoutInflater.inflate (LayoutInflater.java:426)
at android.view.LayoutInflater.inflate (LayoutInflater.java:377)
at androidx.appcompat.app.AppCompatDelegateImpl.setContentView (AppCompatDelegateImpl.java:469)
at androidx.appcompat.app.AppCompatActivity.setContentView (AppCompatActivity.java:140)
at in.gntex.ecommapp.SplashActivity.onCreate (SplashActivity.java:14)
at android.app.Activity.performCreate (Activity.java:6687)
at android.app.Instrumentation.callActivityOnCreate (Instrumentation.java:1140)
at android.app.ActivityThread.performLaunchActivity (ActivityThread.java:2631)
at android.app.ActivityThread.handleLaunchActivity (ActivityThread.java:2743)
at android.app.ActivityThread.-wrap12 (ActivityThread.java)
at android.app.ActivityThread $ H.handleMessage (ActivityThread.java:1490)
at android.os.Handler.dispatchMessage (Handler.java:102)
at android.os.Looper.loop (Looper.java:154)
at android.app.ActivityThread.main (ActivityThread.java:6165)
at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke (native method)
at com.android.internal.os.ZygoteInit $ MethodAndArgsCaller.run (ZygoteInit.java:888)
at com.android.internal.os.ZygoteInit.main (ZygoteInit.java:778)

Is it possible to use Adsense to show ads for a certain period of time in an overlay?

On my Android device and many free applications I have to put myself through advertising. I hope that most people understand the situation, so I will not go into it.

I would like to achieve the same in a web browser.

The idea is that someone will use my "free" service, click the Save button and then see an ad for n Seconds. After the timer reaches 0, the saving process is completed. Again, this is quite common on our mobile phones, but I have not seen it on the internet. I want to play a piece and see what the reaction is.

Is that possible with Adsense? My question is not how to program it. I can and I have. The problem is that Adsense is not displayed because Adsense is loaded at the point where the page loads, but my overlay is not displayed deterministically. I am sure that my goal here is not new, but I can not achieve it.

bash – 2038 is the time for Linux, what then?

Many people know that the Linux time since 1970 is stored in seconds. This time field explodes around the year 2032 and can not be used anymore. I'm thinking about writing a new app that logs the time of the last time you read a file in Android 7.1.1 that uses Linux Kernel 3.18.

I have not done any time-based programming / recording yet and am wondering if there is a new format for 64-bit integers or something that I can use now. I would write a backward compatibility function for the current 32-bit seconds field currently used in Ubuntu.

Note that this is not a question about Android that is not on the topic. I will develop my bash script in Ubuntu on Linux 4.14 or 5.3, which accesses Linux 3.18 on Android via USB.

I know that the time in which Linux explodes is still 19 years away, but I like to make my stuff future proof without having to change it later, or at least simplify future code changes. Since I've been programming for over 30 years, the odds are that I'll still love it in 20 years.

Some examples from Wikipedia:

  • Windows: January 1, 1601 through September 14, 30,828
  • Unix and POSIX: January 1, 1970 to 292,277,026,596 AD

I think the Unix and POSIX format for the year 292 billion will survive the sun, which means that we will move away from the earth and still have a new calendar. Chances are that my programs will be outdated in 292 billion years.

Where can I find the standard for the future Linux time format? Or at least the short list of proposed standards?

Postgresql – Postgres – Why is the scheduling time for a query longer than the execution time?

I work with a customer who has migrated from Oracle to Postgres and has slow query performance. During query performance troubleshooting, EXPLAIN ANALYZE returned:

Planning time: 8143858.55 ms
Execution time: 20.1 ms

Why is the planning time ~ 2.2 hours compared to the execution time of 20 hours? After the migration, all tables were manually parsed to keep statistics up-to-date. It looks weird to me. I'm looking for guidance on some of the other things I may need to check for further troubleshooting.

Thanks!