usa – Can everyone with my passport data see my American arrival/departure record (form I-94)?

When you go to the I-94 website, you have to agree to a warning:

By accessing this website, you understand and acknowledge that:

You are declaring under penalty of perjury pursuant to 28 U.S. Code §
1746 that you: (1) are only seeking records about yourself, (2) are
seeking records about someone for whom you are the legal guardian, or
(3) you have the consent of the person whose records you are seeking.
You are not authorized to access this website to retrieve records of
another person unless you are the person’s legal guardian or you have
the person’s consent.

Unauthorized or improper use or access of this website, including the unauthorized or improper modification, destruction, or disclosure
of any information or data contained herein, is expressly prohibited,
and may result in civil and criminal penalties.

The access and use of this website is subject to monitoring by DHS for administrative, law enforcement, or criminal investigative
purposes, inquiries into alleged wrongdoing or misuse, and to ensure
proper performance of applicable security features and procedures. DHS
may monitor the access or use of this website without further notice.
You may not process classified national security information on this
website.

So at least on paper, it violates US law for someone else to look up your information unless they have your consent. But practically, there’s not a deeply strong mechanism to enforce that, and people or entities outside of the US might not care that they’re breaking US law. I wouldn’t be surprised if there was some monitoring in place to detect bulk queries, brute force attacks, and abuse of the system, but it seems unlikely a rogue employer or someone else performing a single lookup would be caught and face consequences for that even if it is illegal.

If you click through to the privacy notice for the website, it does say that “CBP will retain the information submitted when attempting to access records through this website for 3 months for audit and system performance purposes,” so there’s at least a theoretical possibility they could identify some types of misuse from those logs. If you think your records have been misused, you could conceivably try requesting a copy of those logs that pertain to you; I have no idea if they’ll actually give them to you (or refuse because you’re not a citizen/permanent resident, or perhaps misunderstand your request and just send you your I-94) or do so in a timely fashion or whether they’d be of any use.

So yes, anyone with the required information from your passport can see your travel history (or at least the potentially incomplete version displayed by the website).

usa – Can everyone with my passport data see my American I94?

When you go to the I-94 website, you have to agree to a warning:

By accessing this website, you understand and acknowledge that:

You are declaring under penalty of perjury pursuant to 28 U.S. Code §
1746 that you: (1) are only seeking records about yourself, (2) are
seeking records about someone for whom you are the legal guardian, or
(3) you have the consent of the person whose records you are seeking.
You are not authorized to access this website to retrieve records of
another person unless you are the person’s legal guardian or you have
the person’s consent.

Unauthorized or improper use or access of this website, including the unauthorized or improper modification, destruction, or disclosure
of any information or data contained herein, is expressly prohibited,
and may result in civil and criminal penalties.

The access and use of this website is subject to monitoring by DHS for administrative, law enforcement, or criminal investigative
purposes, inquiries into alleged wrongdoing or misuse, and to ensure
proper performance of applicable security features and procedures. DHS
may monitor the access or use of this website without further notice.
You may not process classified national security information on this
website.

So at least on paper, it violates US law for someone else to look up your information unless they have your consent. But practically, there’s not a deeply strong mechanism to enforce that, and people or entities outside of the US might not care that they’re breaking US law. I wouldn’t be surprised if there was some monitoring in place to detect bulk queries, brute force attacks, and abuse of the system, but it seems unlikely a rogue employer or someone else performing a single lookup would be caught and face consequences for that even if it is illegal.

If you click through to the privacy notice for the website, it does say that “CBP will retain the information submitted when attempting to access records through this website for 3 months for audit and system performance purposes,” so there’s at least a theoretical possibility they could identify some types of misuse from those logs. If you think your records have been misused, you could conceivably try requesting a copy of those logs that pertain to you; I have no idea if they’ll actually give them to you (or refuse because you’re not a citizen/permanent resident, or perhaps misunderstand your request and just send you your I-94) or do so in a timely fashion or whether they’d be of any use.

So yes, anyone with the required information from your passport can see your travel history (or at least the potentially incomplete version displayed by the website).

Muslim Community Website Directory for USA

I have my doubts that what we used to call “affinity” credit cards in the banking industry — and now an “affinity” website — actually are a good business model. I have no statistics, but personally, I am not aware of any website that caters to my ethnicity or other such factors. That does not mean that they do not exist; rather, I just do not know about them. That is my solitary anecdote as to how well such a site might work.

But, the reason that I do not know of any is more important: when I am searching for something to buy, I think about the product, its manufacturers, its retailers or I go to a general search engine. I suppose, if I were looking for a product specific to my ethnicity, religion, etc., I might search for such a directory, but usually I will just put what I am looking for into a search engine and review the results. But, the thought to go to a community directory would not enter my mind.

Have you looked to see what related communities or groups are already on Facebook or other social media sites?

 

usa – Does some US agency keep track of one’s domestic (= within the US) travels by plane, and if so, can one get a copy of it?

Some countries record passenger travels and allow passengers to see these records, e.g. one can retrieve one’s previous arrival and departure dates at Hong Kong.

Does some US agency keep track of one’s domestic (= within the US) travels by plane, and if so, can one get a copy of it?

usa – Back to back student visas for different countries (first Canada, then Australia, then US/UK)

I have a rather complicated question and would appreciate any help. (I will bolden the important and relevant parts to make it easier to follow.) I’m an international student currently studying at a PhD program in Canada (2nd year). Due to the low quality of the current department, in the past few months I have been preparing to apply to some top US/UK programs this year, which I will know about the results by March or so. But some time ago I also had applied to another PhD program at an Australian university that is a good program but pales to the top US/UK programs in my field, and I just received an offer from there and will have to make a decision about the offer in a few weeks.

My question: if I go to Australia and within a few months get an offer from a US/UK university, would it be feasible to get a US/UK visa? It would be a back-to-back student visa applications: Canada (two for two years), then Australia (for a few months), then US/UK. Would the US/UK visa agents be suspicious of this pattern? Would this make getting a US/UK visa more difficult or even impossible? (Please ignore the moral profile of the thought, aka., ditching one program after another; I’m just thinking about the visa challenges at this stage.)

To make things even more complicated, I should add that I have Iranian citizenship, and already struggled to get my Canadian visa; getting a US/UK visa is statistically more difficult for people of my nationality.

NB: I’m not asking for advice on whether or not I should do as above, but rather whether or not this pattern can make getting a visa hard or impossible.

Please do let me know if anything is unclear or if I should make adjustments to my post.

Thank you in advance!

usa – Is it possible to go through the Otay crossing as a pedestrian without taking any stair (e.g., in case of wheelchair or heavy luggage)?

There are ramps to/from the bridge over the freeway.

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Ramp up to bridge:

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Ramp down:

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The rotating gate might seem like an obstacle, but I believe it is quite large/wide. There are a lot of people who pass through these with large parcels, crates, trolleys, luggage, strollers, etc. I imagine a wheelchair should be fine but I haven’t seen anyone pass through with these.

Here is a screenshot from Google Street View showing the gate. That could be another gate to the left of the fence, but it doesn’t look like that actually has access from the ramp.

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usa – US domestic flight numbers when flying past midnight

If I understand correctly, US domestic carriers’ flights are repeated daily. Thus if flight 123 goes from airport X to Y to Z on, say, Monday, then Tuesday, flight 123 of the same carrier will also go from X to Y to Z.

But – what happens if the X->Y leg starts at, say, 23:00, and the Y->Z leg starts at 02:00 the next day? Is the same flight number used? Is it then the case that flight 123 goes, every day, from Y to Z and later in the day from X to Y?

Note: Let’s assume no timezone changes to make things simpler.

usa – Can a person on a US tourist visa receive compensation for participating in a medical trial?

A relative of mine has recently arrived to the US on a B1/B2 visa, which normally prohibits any kind of work in the US. They’ve signed up for a COVID-related trial and have been accepted. Said trial offers a small (few hundred dollars) compensation for participating, which would be a nice bonus in addition to helping the medical community. The trial organizers do not care about the participants visa status, as long as you can report back a couple of times in the future.

Is it legal for someone on a B1/B2 to receive money for participating in a medical trial? Or should my relative participate while refusing payment?

Are souvenir ink stamps at tourist attractions popular in the USA?

I would not say they are popular, but you can get what might loosely be termed “souvenir passport” stamps, because they are commonly provided as part of a promotion which uses the conceit of a passport to record visits. By the same token, not every promotion or package billed as a “passport” involves any physical stamps, however, and some programs now only offer electronic stamps.

The most popular souvenir passport programs, I would surmise, are the National Park Passport (officially the Passport To Your National Parks®, but no one calls it that), and the Major League Baseball Pass-Port. In both cases, you can obtain a stamp from the location you visit for no additional cost beyond admission, and regardless of whether you are enrolled in the visitor program or using their “official” booklet. The stamp and inkpad are commonly available at a counter, and you stamp your own. At a minor league ballpark, you may need to ask more than one person where to go.

Should your visits include a presidential library or a historic lighthouse, you might also look at the Passport to Presidential Libraries, sponsored by the National Archives, and the Lighthouse Passport Program sponsored by the U.S. Lighthouse Society, which should also be available without charge or enrollment.

A more obscure program known as the Blue Goose Passport is sponsored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, if you are visiting locations within the National Wildlife Refuge System. Again, I find it very unlikely anyone will notice or care if you do not use the official booklet.

There is also the Appalachian Trail Passport, aimed at hikers who want to keep a stamp book as a memento of their trek. Unlike the previously mentioned programs, the stamping locations are mostly private businesses, where at least a token purchase might be polite.

Beyond this, there are various local or regional promotions which may be organized as a “passport” program. Kentucky offers stamps on its Bourbon Trail and New Jersey at some of its wineries, for example.

As a last option you could try for a postmark from the local U.S. post office. You could purchase a stamp and ask them to cancel it in your notebook to collect the local postmark as a souvenir. This is likely to be an unusual request at the vast majority of post offices, so good luck if you want to try.