Wildlife – Create a wireless real-time camera trap

I'm looking for a camera trap for viewing wildlife that can capture decent quality images (or even videos) to identify specific features. However, I need to be able to see the images in real time, so the camera needs a wireless connection to a receiving device like a phone.

I've been considering using FPV setup as used in drone racing, but the quality and range seem pretty low, and the strengths of an analog signal seem to be latency and FPS, which are not important to me both , It would be nice to have a digital signal to be able to edit something, eg. B. Save pictures. It would also be cool to connect several cameras to one device.

Are there any solutions to this problem? Would a Raspberry Pi / Arduino setup work in any way? Thank you so much!

Lens – Which lenses do I need for travel and wildlife photography?

While you are allowed need Only two lenses for your use cases want a third lens, the Nifty Fifty. Continue reading:

wildlife: Canon 55-250 mm IS STM. It must be the STM version, as it is significantly better than the non-STM version. Avoid the cheap non-stabilized 75-300mm Canon lenses. I would also say that the lenses with 70-300 mm are not worth the additional cost of a crop sensor camera compared to Canon 55-250 mm. Avoid cheap third-party 70-300mm zooming. Canon lenses are worth their cost.

Walk-around / Travel / Landscape: I would choose the Canon 24mm 1: 2.8 STM. It is very small (so travel-friendly), has a much faster aperture than the kit-zoom lenses often supplied with cameras and is very sharp even at maximum aperture. In addition, the autofocus works perfectly. The downside is that it will not zoom. However, it is sharp enough that a small portion of the digital zoom can be cropped without compromising quality than would be the case with a kit zoom. In my opinion, the biggest problem with this lens is that it is not downsized, but only enlarged. & # 39; t zoom.

If you absolutely need zoom and / or image stabilization, you can use the Canon 15-85mm zoom lens as a travel lens. It's much more expensive than 24mm 1: 2.8 STM and less sharp (DxOMark says 8 P-Mpix for 15-85mm versus 12 P-Mpix for 24mm 1: 2.8 STM), but zooms in and out out. However, the aperture is much slower with this lens than with 24 mm 1: 2.8 STM.

I would not recommend the Canon 17-55mm 1: 2.8 IS USM because of its heavy weight and the autofocus issues that plague this lens. In addition, the 17-55 mm is not sharply wide open when zoomed to the maximum. If you buy a fast zoom, you will open it wide and occasionally zoom in. Therefore, it is a real problem if you do not open wide when fully zoomed in.

You will want that too: Canon 50mm 1: 1.8 STM "Nifty Fifty" / "Plastic Fantastic". It is definitely worth the cost and allows you to take beautiful portrait photos. Even when shooting in low light conditions, this lens is excellent, although it has no image stabilization.

Lens – Which lenses do I need for travel and wildlife photography?

While you are allowed need Only two lenses for your use cases want a third lens, the Nifty Fifty. Continue reading:

wildlife: Canon 55-250 mm IS STM. It must be the STM version, as it is significantly better than the non-STM version. Avoid the cheap non-stabilized 75-300mm Canon lenses. I would also say that the lenses with 70-300 mm are not worth the additional cost of a crop sensor camera compared to Canon 55-250 mm. Avoid cheap third-party 70-300mm zooming. Canon lenses are worth their cost.

Walk-around / Travel / Landscape: I would choose the Canon 24mm 1: 2.8 STM. It is very small (so travel-friendly), has a much faster aperture than the kit-zoom lenses often supplied with cameras and is very sharp even at maximum aperture. In addition, the autofocus works perfectly. The downside is that it will not zoom. However, it is sharp enough that a small portion of the digital zoom can be cropped without compromising quality than would be the case with a kit zoom. In my opinion, the biggest problem with this lens is that it is not downsized, but only enlarged. & # 39; t zoom.

If you absolutely need zoom and / or image stabilization, you can use the Canon 15-85mm zoom lens as a travel lens. It's much more expensive than 24mm 1: 2.8 STM and less sharp (DxOMark says 8 P-Mpix for 15-85mm versus 12 P-Mpix for 24mm 1: 2.8 STM), but zooms in and out out. However, the aperture is much slower with this lens than with 24 mm 1: 2.8 STM.

I would not recommend the Canon 17-55mm 1: 2.8 IS USM because of its heavy weight and the autofocus issues that plague this lens. In addition, the 17-55 mm is not sharply wide open when zoomed to the maximum. If you buy a fast zoom, you will open it wide and occasionally zoom in. Therefore, it is a real problem if you do not open wide when fully zoomed in.

You will want that too: Canon 50mm 1: 1.8 STM "Nifty Fifty" / "Plastic Fantastic". It is definitely worth the cost and allows you to take beautiful portrait photos. Even when shooting in low light conditions, this lens is excellent, although it has no image stabilization.

Looking for the best all-round lens for travel and wildlife. I'm new to photography

While you are allowed need Only two lenses for your use cases want a third lens, the Nifty Fifty. Continue reading:

wildlife: Canon 55-250 mm IS STM. It must be the STM version, as it is significantly better than the non-STM version. Avoid the cheap non-stabilized 75-300mm Canon lenses. I would also say that the 70-300mm lenses are not worth the cost of a crop sensor camera compared to Canon 55-250mm. Avoid cheap third-party 70-300mm zooming. Canon lenses are worth their cost.

Walk-around / Travel / Landscape: I would choose the Canon 24mm 1: 2.8 STM. It is very small (so travel-friendly), has a much faster aperture than the kit-zoom lenses often supplied with cameras and is very sharp even at maximum aperture. In addition, the autofocus works perfectly. The downside is that it will not zoom. However, it is sharp enough that a small portion of the digital zoom can be cropped without compromising quality than would be the case with a kit zoom. In my opinion, the biggest problem with this lens is that it is not downsized, but only enlarged. & # 39; t zoom.

If you absolutely need zoom and / or image stabilization, you can use the Canon 15-85mm zoom lens as a travel lens. It's much more expensive than 24mm 1: 2.8 STM and less sharp (DxOMark says 8 P-Mpix for 15-85mm versus 12 P-Mpix for 24mm 1: 2.8 STM), but zooms in and out out. However, the aperture is much slower with this lens than with 24 mm 1: 2.8 STM.

I would not recommend the Canon 17-55mm 1: 2.8 IS USM because of its heavy weight and the autofocus issues that plague this lens. In addition, the 17-55 mm is not sharply wide open when zoomed to the maximum. If you buy a fast zoom, you will open it wide and occasionally zoom in, so that it is not sharply wide open when you have completely zoomed in on a real problem.

You will want that too: Canon 50mm 1: 1.8 STM "Nifty Fifty" / "Plastic Fantastic". It is definitely worth the cost and allows you to take beautiful portrait photos. Even when shooting in low light conditions, this lens is excellent, although it has no image stabilization.

wildlife – Lens for Nikon D5600, recommended for bird photography

I bought the Nikon D5600 last month.

When photographing birds, I realize that a lens with 70-300 mm is not enough. I have some questions:

(1) Which lens is recommended for wildlife photography? I searched for 150-600mm, but found nothing for Nikon in the local market. Most Canon-compatible lenses are available.

(2) Is the D5600 suitable for such photography or should I upgrade to the D7500?

[ Politics ] Open question: Is my biology professor in line with the border wall that influences wildlife?

Today, my biology professor told me that the border wall will kill many wild animals because the Rio Grande (where the proposed boundary wall is being built) is their main source of water. I'm not a Trump fan, but I want to check information. ,

Nature and Wildlife – What are some important places of untouched natural beauty, traditional culture and history in Thailand?

My sister, my brother-in-law and partner, travel to Thailand for 2 weeks in July of this year. We fly to Bangkok and fly out of Phuket.

What are some of the cultural, natural and historical highlights in Thailand? Are there some places off the beaten path?

Recommended Device – Zoom lens (s) for wildlife photography with limited budget (Nikon D500)

I'm just about to buy some new lenses to accompany my shiny new Nikon D500 in a month on a safari trip. In the past, I've used a Sigma 150-500mm (bought 2009 – see here) with a Nikon D90, and although this was a great combination for a beginner, I'd like to take my photography to the next level of upcoming travel

With that in mind, I'd like to spend about £ 3k on one or more new lenses, with or without a teleconverter.

It is important to me to have a range of at least 500mm to get close-ups when I'm unable to get closer to the subject. Likewise, I need a shorter range for the subjects to which I can position myself directly.

In addition, 95% of my pictures are taken in a vehicle (without doors). Image stabilization is therefore very important, although in my opinion this would be one of my drawbacks if it were necessary.

Since most photos are taken in morning and evening game drives in lower light conditions, a larger aperture would be an advantage, possibly indispensable.

Sum up;

Essentials

  • picture quality
  • 100-500mm range
  • Large aperture (minimum 5.6 in my view)

bonus

  • Subdued image stabilization

On this basis I consider the following combination:

Nikon f / 5.6 200-500 mm (see here) – This will give me the 500mm range and good stabilization, but obviously the aperture is not ideal.

Nikon f / 4G 70-200mm (see here) – This gives me a better aperture while affecting range. It also has a stabilization.

Nikon TC 14E teleconverter (see here) – This converter is fully compatible with the second lens and partially compatible with the first, which will hopefully allow me to extend my reach beyond 500mm, but more importantly, I have the chance to use the f / 4G optimal use up to 280 mm

As much as I would like to spend more on a combination of main glasses, I just can not afford it. The question is, however, if I would buy a main lens better than the above combination.

In my opinion, the zoom range on a safari is very important, as you never know how near / far your subject will be, not to mention that it moves a lot.

When I go down Zoom Street, is the above combination a good one, based on my listed priorities, or are there any alternative lenses that better meet my needs?

Note: I can not rent lenses because my trip takes 3-4 weeks. I'll probably be driving later in the year, so leasing does not save much money in the long run

Lens – Nikon Gear Upgrade Recommendation (for Wildlife)

Forgive me, if such questions are not allowed here, I have no local photo experts / shops and therefore have very few options …

I'm in the process of updating all my camera gear to prepare for my next safari in Africa in a month. I've researched a lot, but before I buy the individual articles, I would really appreciate another person's opinion on my proposed selection.

To update – The reason I want to upgrade my equipment is a) my current equipment is very outdated and b) I would like to use Nikon lenses instead of third-party brands like Sigma, Tamron etc.

Just a few comments before listing my equipment.

  • Most pictures are taken in a toy vehicle (ie no tripod, only monopods and freehand).
  • I will photograph wildlife, occasionally sentient beings and occasionally scenery
  • I can afford to spend around £ 3,000, but I can not afford to go beyond that, unless it is absolutely necessary.
  1. Nikon D90
  2. Large zoom – Sigma 150-500mm (see here)
  3. Small Zoom – Tamron 55-200mm (see here)
  4. Macro lens – Sigma 105mm (see here)
  5. Wide Angle Lens – Sigma 10-20mm (see here)
  1. Nikon D500 (already bought, exclude from the budget)
  2. Big Zoom – Nikon 200-500mm (see here)
  3. Small Zoom – Nikon 28-300mm (see here)
  4. Macro lens – Nikon DX Micro 85mm (see here)
  5. Wide angle lens – no upgrade
  6. New – Teleconverter – Nikon TC-14E ​​(see here)

Does anyone have alternative recommendations or is that a good choice above?

Besides, I've never found the need, nor would I consider it considerate for the animals to use a flash. However, are there circumstances in which a flash would be appropriate, and if so, should I upgrade my old SB-600 flash? I looked at the SB-700 or the SB-5000 …

Equipment Recommendation – How to remotely take good pictures of wildlife?

If you want, it is National Geographic-like nature's images-you're prepared for a huge case of stickers, thousands of dollars for just one lens, and the total absence of anything practical for travel. (See Roger Cicala's Lensrentals video on Canon's large white supertel photo lenses.)

You could buy the Canon EF 75-300 III, but this is a very limited lens and you will end up using the technique to use it well or get a lot of blurry photos. The models 70-300 IS or 55-250 IS would be better, but more expensive. However, you can also rent a 100-400L Superzoom for the trip. But this is a lens with a price of over $ 2000 that you need to catch up on.

I also use the Canon EF 400mm lens (600mm equivalent on my APS-C DSLR) to shoot birds and deer in the back canyons here in Southern California. This is often not enough. Just so you have a sense. In wildlife, your field vehicle actually counts more on how close you can get.

Only me, but I would consider a superzoom bridge camera as a model of the Panasonic FZ series into consideration. This is a fixed lens camera with super telephoto equivalent for the super zoom lens because it uses a much smaller sensor (1 "format or 1 / 2,3" format) compared to a dSLR or mirrorless camera. The picture quality may not be as high, but should still be higher than with a smartphone and accessory lenses.

However, you should check in reviews how fast the cameras record and activate the autofocus. Wildlife tends to move quickly. The shutter delay can be very frustrating.